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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: faulty

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  • Downs Syndrome, Turners Syndrome, And Redgreen Color Blindness - 682 words
    1.) Three genetic disorders are Down's syndrome, Turner's syndrome, and Red-green color blindness. They are all caused by undesirable genes inherited by normal genetic mechanisms. These mutations are usually recessive because dominant ones usually die. Turner's Syndrome is caused by faulty cell division known as non disjunction. This occurs when chromosomes fail to separate. IN this disorder, the affected have one "x" chromosome. The effect are an underdeveloped female, mental retardedness, and sterility. Down syndrome is a condition caused by an oddosome that occurs on the pair #21. It results in severe abnormality physical and mental defects. For example, shorter bubble-shape eyes, short f ...
    Related: blindness, down syndrome, downs, cell division, external environment
  • 1984 Vs Animal Farm - 1,278 words
    1984 Vs. Animal Farm 1984 vs. Animal Farm 1984, by George Orwell, is a very powerful drama which involves man and totalitarian society. It is a story of a lonely rebel whose only valuable is his mind and who later conspires with another in an attempt to separate from their increasingly dominant hate-infested society. In 1984, Orwell depicts the susceptibility of today's society and its possibility of becoming a realm of lies. In it, the masses live in constant fear, being monitored at all times. He also admonishes the fact that this society can be in store for us in the future. The main theme of 1984 is that without independent thought and freedom, corruption can and will transform decent or ...
    Related: 1984, animal farm, farm, main theme, leon trotsky
  • Adlerian Psychotherapy: An Overview Of Theory And Practice - 1,200 words
    Adlerian Psychotherapy: An Overview Of Theory And Practice Abstract Understand, interpret, direct. This statement is an oversimplification of sorts, but defines the essence of Adlerian psychotherapy. From this minimal overview of Adlerian theory, we can begin to elaborate and explore the intricacies of individual psychology. Adlerians are concerned with understanding the unique and private beliefs and strategies of the individual (private logic and mistaken notions) that we create in childhood, and which serve as a reference for attitudes, private views of self, others and the world, and behavior (lifestyle). Therapeutic work with clients involves short-term and intensive work to increase so ...
    Related: overview, personal growth, self concept, holistic approach, perfection
  • Adult Illiteracy - 3,219 words
    ... atic, enemies of early, intensive teaching of phonics. Frank Smith and Kenneth Goodman are two of today's most influential proponents of the look and say or as they would term it, whole language philosophy of teaching reading. San Diego State University Professor Patrick Groff recently reviewed 43 reading texts, all published in the1980's and used by teachers' colleges in training reading teachers, to see if they included the findings of researchers that the code-emphasis or phonics approach to teaching reading should be used. He found that none of these books advocate phonics. In fact, only nine of these books inform teachers that there is current debate about if or when phonics should ...
    Related: adult, adult education, adult literacy, illiteracy, state university
  • Against Capital Punishment - 1,191 words
    ... uggests that rather than deterring homicide, state executions may actually increase the murder rate. This phenomenon has been named the brutalization hypothesis. It suggests that through suggestion, modeling, or by legitimizing killing, homicide numbers increase. In a study taken from 1957 to 1982 by Isaac Ehrlich, the number of executions in 1957 was 65 and the number of murders was 8,060. From 1958 to1960 the execution rate stayed roughly the same, but the murder rate increased (Bender& Leone, 1986, p. 99-100) (Vila & Morris, 1997, p.223). Throughout the remainder of the study the execution rate dropped and the murder rate continued to increase. In 1981 the murder rate was at 22,520 a ...
    Related: capital murder, capital punishment, punishment, first year, african american
  • Aging Theories - 1,767 words
    ... ter a certain number of divisions, the clock genes are triggered and may produce proteins responsible for cell destruction (Keeton, 1992, 50). Cellular Aging In 1961, a discovery made by Leonard Hayflick showed that normal, diploid cells from such continually Areplaced@ parts of the body as skin, lungs, and bone marrow, divide a limited number of times. Although the cells stop dividing at the point just before DNA synthesis, they do not die. The longer-lived the species, the more divisions the cells undergo. As the age of an individual increases, the number of potential divisions decreases (Ricklefs and Finch, 1995, 29). This discovery was found using fibroblasts, or cells found in the c ...
    Related: aging, aging process, bone fracture, concise encyclopedia, testosterone
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,375 words
    Air Traffic Strike The Pressures of PATCO: Strikes and Stress in the 1980s By Rebecca Pels -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- Note on electronic format: you can access any citation by clicking on the note number. In order to leave citations and return to the main text of the document, press the Back key on your viewer. -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- On August 3, 1981 almost 13,000 air traffic controllers went on strike after months of negotiations with the federal government. During the contract talks, Robert Poli, president of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Association (PATCO), explained the union's th ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, aviation safety
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,516 words
    ... emands rested upon prevailing norms of workers' interests and power. Since World War II, labor leaders have placed a disproportionate amount of emphasis on economic gains, and the collective bargaining process has gravitated toward these areas. At the same time, management has carefully guarded its prerogatives from the bargaining process.24 In this context, it seems likely that in envisioning a future strike, controllers felt that wages could and should be one aspect of it. Yet wages were not the decisive factor for most, and their other demands, derived from a far more vital, ideological interest than economic gains, evoked their passionate and surprisingly unified response. Individual ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, worlds apart
  • Airline Safety - 1,183 words
    Airline Safety Airline Safety Many people travel by airplane all around the world. For some people it is the only way they can get to where they are going. On a daily basis, averages of 28 to 30,000 seats are filled on airplanes (Bear, Stearns Co. URL www.hotelonline.com). At each airport, there are hundreds of arrivals and departures worldwide. Even though airline officials say flying is safe, accidents kill many people because airlines neglect to prevent human error or repair faulty equipment. Sometimes I think the only reason an airplane could crash is if something on the plane were to break. However, most of the time that is not the case. A survey conducted by Boeing found that flight cr ...
    Related: airline, time magazine, internet connection, chicago illinois, faulty
  • All My Sons By Miller - 709 words
    All My Sons By Miller In the play "All My Sons", by Arthur Miller, the word father means the personification of goodness and infallibility to Chris Keller. There was a strong relationship between Chris and his father, Joe. Everything Joe had done in his life was for Chris. His entire factory was intended for Chris once he retired. Throughout the play there was question of Joes innocence in the death of 21 pilots, who were flying planes that had parts from Joes factory. Chris strongly believed that his father played no part in those deaths and that the blame lay solely on Joes partner, Herbert Deever. At the end of the play, Chris realization that his father was guilty brings about anger and ...
    Related: arthur miller, miller, sons, chris
  • Amazing Grace - 587 words
    Amazing Grace Amazing Grace, by Jonathan Kozol, is about the author's interviews with, and thoughts about, some of the poorest people who live in the poorest sections of New York. The facts stated in Amazing Grace startled me with the prevalence and desperation of the poverty situation in areas like the South Bronx and Mott Haven. These are areas where there are hundreds of thousands of people living in broken, crowded, and rundown apartment buildings, "That," says Kozol, "most people would not even kennel their dogs in." (pg. 51) I have been to areas near my home that I thought were poverty stricken, but they pale in comparison to some of the situations that I read about in Amazing Grace. O ...
    Related: amazing, grace, jonathan kozol, upper class, haven
  • Analysis Of Isaav Asimovs The Machine That Won The War - 468 words
    Analysis Of Isaav Asimov's The Machine That Won The War "The Machine That Won the War," by Isaac Asimov, is a story that teaches a valuable lesson about humanity and also has an ironic twist at the end. The setting is the future of Earth, and a great war had just been won against an enemy race. Two men, Swift and Henderson, are debating over who really won the war for Earth: the giant strategy computer known as Multivac, or the men in charge of making the maneuvers and programming the computer. John Henderson is an excitable man, while Lamar Swift, the military captain, is calm but rational. While the people hailed the computer, the two really knew who the heroes were. Henderson explained th ...
    Related: isaac asimov, machine, difficult decisions, internal conflict, ironic
  • Anemia - 398 words
    Anemia What is Anemia? Anemia is a deficiency of red blood cells or hemoglobin in the blood. The word anemia comes from two Greek roots, together meaning without blood. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, anemia referred to the pallor of the skin and mucous membranes. After medical science advanced, blood cell counts could be done. Anemia became the disease we know today. Symptoms of Anemia Mild anemia may have no outer symptoms. Weakness, fatigue, and pallor are very common symptom. Symptoms of severe anemia are shortness of breath, rapid heartbeat, lightheadedness, headache, ringing in the ears, irritability, restless leg syndrome, mental confusion, dizziness, fainting, and dimmed ...
    Related: anemia, cell anemia, iron deficiency anemia, bone marrow, family history
  • Animal Experimentation - 777 words
    Animal Experimentation Animal Experimentation ANIMAL RIGHTS-- The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was founded in England in 1824 to promote humane treatment of work animals, such as cattle and horses, and of household pets. Within a few decades similar organizations existed throughout Europe. An American society was founded in New York in 1866. Then after, these organizations were protesting the use of animals in laboratory experiments and the use of vivisection for teaching. Until the mid-1970s the focus on humane treatment of animals continued. After that period, animal rights activists enlarged their priorities, considerably. It is estimated that 70 million animals are us ...
    Related: animal behavior, animal experimentation, animal research, animal rights, animal testing, experimentation
  • Animal Farm - 986 words
    Animal Farm The main purpose of satire is to attack, and intensely criticise the target subject. This is superbly carried out in the classic piece of satire, Animal Farm. The main targets at the brunt of this political satire are the society that was created in Russia after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, and the leaders involved in it. George Orwell successfully condemns these targets through satirical techniques such as irony, fable, and allegory. The immediate object of attack in Orwell's political satire is the society that was created in Russia after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. The events narrated in Animal Farm obviously and continuously refer to events in another story, the hi ...
    Related: animal farm, farm, russian revolution, using animals, concrete
  • Animal Rights Protests - 1,036 words
    ... -human species. But while animal advocates generally call themselves environmentalists, the reverse is not true. Jim Motavalli writes that "environmentalists tend to see the animal movement as hysterical, shrill and one note.' They're often embarrassed by the lab raids, the emotional picketing and the high-pitched hyperbole." If the rhetoric of groups like COK alienates groups with a natural affinity for animal issues, how can it change the mind of a 55 year old wealthy white woman who's always loved the look and feel of a fur coat? Although the White House simply stood silently in response to COK's sidewalk activities, the scene was quite different when Compassion Over Killing picketed ...
    Related: animal liberation, animal rights, animal rights movement, animal testing, animal welfare, rights movement
  • Animal Rights Protests - 1,036 words
    ... -human species. But while animal advocates generally call themselves environmentalists, the reverse is not true. Jim Motavalli writes that "environmentalists tend to see the animal movement as hysterical, shrill and one note.' They're often embarrassed by the lab raids, the emotional picketing and the high-pitched hyperbole." If the rhetoric of groups like COK alienates groups with a natural affinity for animal issues, how can it change the mind of a 55 year old wealthy white woman who's always loved the look and feel of a fur coat? Although the White House simply stood silently in response to COK's sidewalk activities, the scene was quite different when Compassion Over Killing picketed ...
    Related: animal liberation, animal rights, animal rights movement, animal testing, animal welfare, rights movement
  • Animal Testing - 1,180 words
    Animal Testing Medicines, household products, food, and basically everything involved in the life of an average person has to under go a form of testing before it is legal to be placed on a shelf and if available to the public. The same tests are performed on every medical procedure that is introduced to surgeons. Since the only way to directly mimic the human body is to use it itself, scientists were forced to find the closest and best alternative. That is where animals were introduced to the medical profession. Experimentation on animals date back to as early as 500 BC, making this form of medical validation one of the oldest known to humans. It is not only one of the oldest but one of the ...
    Related: animal testing, animal welfare, testing, medical profession, laboratory animals
  • Animal Testing - 1,131 words
    ... rted to research facilities, and they suffered from cramping and over heating. The lack of adequate ventilation and extremes in temperature caused death to over 55 percent of the guinea pigs, hamsters and rabbits on their way to the research laboratory. This is not an isolated case, every year in Britain alone millions of animals suffer and die in laboratory experiments. They are burnt, scalded, poisoned and starved, given electric shocks and addicted to drugs, they are subjected to near freezing temperatures, reared in total darkness from birth and deliberately inflicted with disease like arthritis, cancer, diabetes, oral infections, stomach ulcers, syphilis, herpes and AIDS, (Sharpe, 1 ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal research, animal testing, testing, using animals
  • Antibiotics - 560 words
    Antibiotics Antibiotics are chemical compounds used to kill or inhibit the growth of infectious organisms. Originally the term antibiotic referred only to organic compounds, produced by bacteria or molds, that are toxic to other microorganisms. The term is now used loosely to include synthetic and semisynthetic organic compounds. Antibiotic refers generally to antibacterials; however, because the term is loosely defined, it is preferable to specify compounds as being antimalarials, antivirals, or antiprotozoals. All antibiotics share the property of selective toxicity: They are more toxic to an invading organism than they are to an animal or human host. Penicillin is the most well-known anti ...
    Related: bacterial cell, amino acids, nucleic acids, classified, chromosome
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