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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: farce

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  • Arthur Miller And Tennessee Williams, Including A Streetcar Named Desire - 4,269 words
    ... g the subject matter of Face to Face (1975) overly familiar and rating his English-language The Serpent's Egg (1977) an overall failure. Autumn Sonata (1978) and From the Life of the Marionettes (1980) were critical successes, however, although the latter failed at the box office. Fanny and Alexander (1983), a rich and fantastic portrait of childhood in a theatrical family, was regarded as one of his finest films and won an Academy Award for best foreign language film of 1983. Subsequently, Bergman directed After the Rehearsal (1984), his meditation on a life in the theater. WILLIAM S. PECHTER Bibliography: Bergman, Ingmar, Bergman on Bergman (1973); Cowie, Peter, Ingmar Bergman: A Criti ...
    Related: arthur, arthur miller, miller, named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire
  • Blithe Spirit By Noel Coward - 997 words
    Blithe Spirit By Noel Coward Blithe Spirit written by Noel Coward was first published in 1941. Noel Coward was known for his sophisticated comedies of modern life (Seymour, Smith 261). It is sophisticated yet hilarious to the readers. Seymour and Smith stated that Cowards plays, "are within their admittedly-but unashamedly-extremely narrow limits, accurate truthful, cynical and funny"(261). It is one of the greatest farces ever written. Blithe Spirit is the story of Charles Condomine who loses his wife, Elvira, at a young age. Charles remarries a lady named Ruth. The couple decides to have a sйance to get some ideas for a novel that Charles is in the process of writing. After the s ...
    Related: coward, noel, modern life, henry holt, universe
  • Catch 22 Analysis - 1,461 words
    Catch 22 Analysis Comical in style and language, the message that Catch-22 introduces to its reader is one of a grim worlds decay. Hellers fictional story portrays absurd characters and situations, but the underlying theme of human decadence is clearly visible, especially in the last portion of the book. Hellers attitude towards his characters also gives way to an overwhelming tone of pity and sorrow for the world and its population. The overall theme of the novel depicts a decline in individuality, decay of human moral, and a certain loss of awareness of both surrounding events and personal action. The wartime atmosphere that surrounds the book and its characters has directly helped bring a ...
    Related: catch, catch 22, human life, world war ii, recognition
  • Catch - 1,214 words
    Catch-22 In 1961, Joseph Heller published Catch-22, his first novel. Based on his own war experiences, the novel wickedly satirized bureaucracy, patriotism, and all manner of traditional American ideals. This was reflective of the increasing disdain for traditional viewpoints that was growing in America at that time. (Potts, p. 13) The book soon became championed as another voice in the antiwar movement of the 1960s. However, Heller himself claimed that his novel was less about World War II, or war at all, than it was an allegory for the Cold War and the materialistic "Establishment" attitudes of the Eisenhower era. (Kiley, pp. 318-321) Thus, Catch-22 represents a rebellion against the stand ...
    Related: catch, catch 22, self reliance, oxford university press, pages
  • Catcher In The Rye Character Analysis Of Holden - 2,065 words
    ... tors, both commenting on the problems of their times, and both novels have been recurrently banned or restricted (Davis 318). John Aldrige remarked that both novels are "study in the spiritual picaresque, the joinery that for the young is all one way, from holy innocence to such knowledge as the world offers, from the reality which illusion demands and thinks it sees to the illusion which reality insists, at the point of madness, we settle for" (129). Harvey Breit of The Atlantic Bookshelf wrote of Holden Caulfield: "(He) struck me as an urban, a transplanted Huck Finn. He has a colloquialism as marked as Huck's . . . Like Huck, Holden is neither comical or misanthrope. He is an observer ...
    Related: catcher, catcher in the rye, character analysis, character study, holden, holden caulfield, main character
  • Charcters In Animal Farm - 1,790 words
    ... d although they don't speak, they are definitely a force the other animals have to contend with. Orwell almost speaks of the dogs as mindless robots, so dedicated to Napoleon that they can't really speak for themselves. This contention is supported as Orwell describes Napoleon's early and suspicious removal of six puppies from their mother. The reader is left in the dark for a while, but later is enlightened when Orwell describes the chase of Snowball. Napoleon uses his secret dogs for the first time here; before Snowball has a chance to stand up and give a counter-argument to Napoleon's disapproval of the windmill, the dogs viciously attack the pig, forcing him to flee, never to return ...
    Related: animal farm, farm, social status, orthodox church, squealer
  • Comparingthe Pact And Memoirs Of A Geisha - 1,489 words
    ... e, both her and Chriss parents force the idea the one day Chris and Emily will be together, get married and have children. Emily knows nothing different than to be with Chris, because that is what everyone wants. It was clear that Chris loved her; of course hed want to make love to her. And certainly it was right-for Gods sake, shed been hearing her name linked to Chriss since before she could speak (Picoult, 141). Emily is so used to being told that her and Chris aregoing to end up together, it is as if her believing anything else is wrong. Emily begins feeling, as their relationship becomes more serious, that what she and Chris has doesnt feel quite right. This frightens Emily, because ...
    Related: geisha, pact, great depression, best friend, pleasant
  • Courtly Love In Chaucer - 1,778 words
    Courtly Love in Chaucer Courtly Love in Chaucer In the "Franklin's Tale," Geoffrey Chaucer satirically paints a picture of a marriage steeped in the tradition of courtly love. As Dorigen and Arveragus' relationship reveals, a couple's preoccupation with fulfilling the ritualistic practices appropriate to courtly love renders the possibility of genuine love impossible. Marriage becomes a pretense to maintain courtly position because love provides the opportunity to demonstrate virtue. Like true members of the gentility, they practice the distinct linguistic and behavioral patterns which accompany the strange doctrine of courtly love. The characters' true devotion to the relationship becomes s ...
    Related: chaucer, courtly, courtly love, geoffrey chaucer, true love
  • Crucible In Detail - 784 words
    Crucible In Detail A crucible, as defined by the Merriam-Webester Concise Electronic Dictionary, is"the state or fact of being tested (as by suffering)", which attests to what Elizabeth Proctor is going through exactly. Elizabeth has quite a crucible to struggle through. The infidelity of her husband is a major element in her being. Her struggle includes staying true to both her husband and her God. Another is the persecution by Abigail Warren, a former employee and assistant. Elizabeth also has to suffer through the decision to reveal the unfaithfulness of John or to remain strong in her love of him. All of this is too much for Elizabeth and the burden is very heavy. Elizabeths husband, Joh ...
    Related: crucible, the crucible, john proctor, reverend hale, familiar
  • Ethics Of Animal Testing - 1,763 words
    Ethics Of Animal Testing This theme song to a popular cartoon is a farce dealing with experiments carried out on animals. In the cartoon one mouse is made very smart and wants to take over the world while the other is clearly not as smart. While the cartoon makes jokes, the reality is that mice and other animals re being used for medical tests every day. For some people this testing brings up ethical questions. One of the biggest questions: is it really necessary to take the lives of animals in the name of science and for the betterment of humanity? For animal rights activists, like People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), the answer is no. PETA pressures labs into halting experim ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal liberation, animal research, animal rights, animal rights movement, animal testing, animal welfare
  • History Of Popular Culture - 1,381 words
    History of popular culture 'Functions of festivals in Early Modern Europe...' University level Essay History of Popular Culture 'What were the functions of popular festivals, etc. in Early Modern Europe? And why did the authorities, civil and ecclesiastical seek to control or suppress them?' In Early Modern Europe festivals were the setting for heroes and their stories, to be celebrated by the populace. They posed a change from their everyday life. In those days people lived in remembrance of one festival and in expectance of the next. Different kinds of festivals were celebrated in different ways. There were festivals that marked an individual occasion and weren't part of the festival calen ...
    Related: history, popular culture, different ways, different kinds, geographical
  • Human Flaws Of Orgon In Tartuffe - 840 words
    Human Flaws Of Orgon In Tartuffe Human Flaws of Orgon In Tartuffe The play Tartuffe, by Moliere, is a work that was created to show People a flaw, in their own human nature. There are two characters who portray, the Main flaw, presented in the play. Both Madame Pernelle and Orgon are blinded by The farces of Tartuffe and must be coaxed into believing the truth. The fact That Orgon and Madame Pernelle are too weak to see the truth is the main driving Force throughout the play. The most obvious weakness shared between Orgon and Madame Pernelle is gullibility. The trait of gullibility can be seen as a family Trait as suggested in an essay on Tartuffe : His mother shares his capacity For self-de ...
    Related: human nature, orgon, tartuffe, maynard mack, norton company
  • Imagery - 2,411 words
    ... ading of a poem, examining the work for meter. Meter is a regular pattern of unstressed and stressed syllables in a line or lines of poetry. BLANK VERSE A Blank Verse is a poem written in unrhymed iambic pentameter. Consider the following from The Ball Poem by John Berryman: What is the boy now, who has lost his ball, What, what is he to do? I saw it go Merrily bouncing, down the street, and then Merrily over-there it is in the water! COUPLET A Couplet is a stanza of two lines, usually rhyming. The following by Andrew Marvell is an example of a rhymed couplet: Had we but world enough and time, This coyness, lady, were no crime. QUATRAIN Quatrain is a four-line stanza which may be rhymed ...
    Related: imagery, step approach, rhyme scheme, john donne, venetian
  • Jungle - 1,068 words
    Jungle The family knows all the dirty secrets of the meat-packing industry. The most spoiled of meats becomes sausage. All manner of dishonesty exists in the selling diseased, rotten, and adulterated meat to American households. The working members of the family fall into a silent stupor due to the grinding poverty and misery of their lives. Ona and Jurgis grow apart. Jurgis begins to drink heavily. He delivers himself from full-blown alcoholism through force of will, but the desire to drink always torments him. Antanas suffers all manner of childhood illnesses, but the measles attacks him with fury. However, he reaches his first birthday owing to his strong constitution despite the privatio ...
    Related: jungle, the jungle, american justice, justice system, testify
  • Kurt Vonnegut - 1,860 words
    Kurt Vonnegut Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. is a contemporary American author whose works have been described by Richard Giannone as comic masks covering the tragic farce that is our contemporary life (Draper, 3784). Vonnegut's life has had a number of significant influences on his works. Influences from his personal philosophy, his life and experiences, and his family are evident elements in his works. Among his comic masks are three novels: Cat's Cradle, The Sirens of Titan, and God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater. Throughout these novels, elements such as attitude, detail, narrative technique, setting, and theme can be viewed with more understanding when related to certain aspects of his life. These correl ...
    Related: kurt, kurt vonnegut, vonnegut, human life, existential philosophy
  • Left And Right Brain - 661 words
    Left And Right Brain Psychology Right Brain, Left Brain The human brain is a miraculous organ. It regulates thought, memory, judgment, personal identity, and other aspects of what is commonly called mind. It also regulates aspects of the body including body temperature, blood pressure, and the activity of internal organs to help the body respond to its environment and to maintain the body's health. In fact, the brain is considered so central to human well-being and survival that the death of the brain is considered in many parts of the world to be equal legally to the death of the person. In the past fifteen years or so there has been a lot of talk of left brain and right brain people. Clear ...
    Related: brain, human brain, left hand, personal identity, everyday life
  • Love And Color - 1,747 words
    Love And Color Is love colorblind? Just three decades ago, Thurgood Marshall was only months away from appoint- ment to the Supreme Court when he suffered an indignity that today seems not just outrageous but almost incomprehensible. He and his wife had found their dream house in a Virginia suburb of Washington, D.C., but could not lawfully live together in that state: he was black and she was Asian. Fortunately for the Marshalls, in January 1967 the Supreme Court struck down the anti-interracial-marriage laws in Virginia and 18 other states. And in 1967 these laws were not mere leftover scraps from an extinct era. Two years before, at the crest of the civil-rights revolution, a Gallup poll ...
    Related: true love, mass media, karl marx, self esteem, unmarried
  • Mark Twain - 1,508 words
    Mark Twain It is indisputable that, during his many years of writing, Mark Twain established himself as a literary genius. It is also indisputable that the primary reason for his success as an author was his quick wit and sense of humor. During this nations time of political and social division, Twain wrote about many of the simpler things in life while always showing his humorist side. His brilliant comedic mind was especially unusual for any popular writer around during this rough time period in the nations history. Mark Twains humorist views and writings truly solidify him as the forefather of American humor. Unlike many writers of his time, Samuel Clemens, better known as his pen name, M ...
    Related: mark, mark twain, twain, time travel, career path
  • Moliere - 1,468 words
    Moliere Molire Molire, pseudonym of JEAN BAPTISTE POQUELIN (1622-73), French dramatist, and one of the greatest of all writers of comedies. His universal comic types still delight audiences; his plays are often produced and have been much translated. Molire was born in Paris on January 15, 1622, the son of a wealthy tapestry maker. From an early age he was completely devoted to the theater. In 1643 he joined a theatrical company established by the Bjarts, a family of professional actors; he married one of the members of the family, Armande Bjart, in 1662. The troupe, which Molire named the Illustre Thtre, played in Paris until 1645 and then toured the provinces for 13 years, returning to Par ...
    Related: moliere, divine right, royal society, century literature, misanthrope
  • Pantomime - 1,015 words
    Pantomime Pantomime This paper is about pantomime, about it's origin, it's people, how it has evolved, and how wonderful it is. Pantomime is a dramatic performance in which a story is told or a theme developed through expressive bodily or facial movement. The origin of pantomime can be traced back to classical farce and the Italian Commedia Dell'arte. Not all pantomime is silent. The completely silent performance of pantomime was invented in Rome. Pantomime is sometimes used to worship. Mime is a short way of saying pantomime and also means someone who performs pantomime. A mime, if performing on the streets, will have a hat that is passed around for spectators to put money in. When doing pa ...
    Related: pantomime, prehistoric man, the harlequin, modern american, hunting
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