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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: american mind

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  • Abortion - 2,207 words
    ... about abortion and that the time was right for a professionally ambitious leaders to take advantage of the still unfocused opposition of regular physicians to abortion. Horatio Storer laid the groundwork for the anti-abortion campaign he launched later in the year by writing influential physicians all around the country early in 1857 and inquiring about the abortion laws in each of their states (148-149). Reactions around the country continued to bode well for the success of Storer's national project. Still another prominent professor of obstetrics, Dr. Jesse Boring of the Atlanta Medical School, who was at the AMA meeting in 1857, when Storer called for action, came out publicly agains ...
    Related: abortion, abortion laws, good faith, district attorney, unborn
  • Allan Bloom Clearly Distinguishes Between Prestigious Private Liberal Arts Colleges And State Universities In The Liberal Stu - 454 words
    Allan Bloom clearly distinguishes between Prestigious Private Liberal Arts Colleges and State Universities in the Liberal Studies selection of his book, The Closing of the American Mind. He strongly believes that the University has to stand for something. There is not a clear definition of what an educated human being is, and it is the responsibility of a University to decide what subjects are going to be required by their students to obtain a degree. Allan Bloom characterizes the prestigious institutions as colleges that are supposed to provide liberal education. He classifies the State Schools as colleges that are to prepare specialists to fit the systematic demands of this complex society ...
    Related: allan, allan bloom, arts, bloom, liberal, liberal arts, liberal education
  • American Studies - 1,845 words
    American Studies Understanding America November 11, 1999 Midterm Examination American Studies can be a variety of different meanings to a lot of different authors. They are all pretty much on the same note, but with different alterations. For me, I believe that it is to make connections between the past and how it will impact the future. American Studies has transformed overtime. Each individual has their own beliefs and feelings of what it really means. In Gene Wise's article he states how he is interested in how the field of American Studies has transformed overtime, what American Studies methodology is, and the types of questions that American Studies practitioners ask. I believe that the ...
    Related: african american, american, american culture, american history, american mind, american studies, early american
  • American Themes - 591 words
    American Themes American Theme-Individualism Literary works reflect the main ideas of the American mind. An American theme that is seen in various works of literature is individuality. Individuality is expressed in three different literary works from Frost, Chopin, and Paine. These works of literature aid us in developing an open mind about what the American people should expect in society. Following others doesnt guide us in any way because it does not allow for us to express our innermost feelings. Throughout these three works, individualism is expressed in various ways. Although all three works do illustrate the idea of individualism, Paine seems to approach it in a different way. Robert ...
    Related: american, american mind, american people, central theme, most american
  • Economic Reasons For American Independence - 1,020 words
    Economic Reasons for American Independence Eleven years before America had declared it's independence there was 1,450,000 white and 400,000 Negro subjects of the crown. The colonies extended from the Atlantic to the Appalachian barrier. The life in these thirteen colonies was primarily rural, the economy based on agriculture, most were descended from the English, and politics were only the concern of land owners. Throughout these prosperous colonies, only a small portion of the population were content with their lives as subjects of George III. Most found it hard to be continually enthusiastic for their King sitting on his thrown, thousands of miles away. Despite this there were few signs of ...
    Related: american, american colonies, american colonists, american independence, american mind, american people, american republic
  • Forests - 1,176 words
    ... tness and quality. Again, all the lumber companies can see is money not nature. The air that we are breathing right now is progressively becoming worse to take in, causing cancers that haven't even been identified yet. Where is this stemming from? The people's demand for logging companies to continue to take wood for American's personal use. Americans are definitely not aware of the extent of what is going on it their country. They do not realize that by purchasing what they think to be insignificant everyday products, such as paper cups or computer printing paper and not putting them in the recycling bin is only contributing to their eventual extinction. The government is more than awar ...
    Related: environmental issues, economic growth, economic system, gluttony, educate
  • How Useful Is The Term Cultural Revolution - 1,049 words
    ... he authority to control, that it used fascination rather than compulsion to weave a web of acquiescence. I think you can see history repeating itself, ordinary people did not understand science, and therefore Rozak felt it had a position of misplaced reverence. Did the improvement in education erode the pedestal upon which society had placed science? Inevitably if you educate the masses this will ultimately change the culture - there are certainly echoes of Rousseau here. Rozaks students felt that it ruthlessly eroded their spiritual values, so here again is the question of religion in conflict with science; history again repeating itself? Did this rejection of technocracy by the radical ...
    Related: cultural revolution, eastern religions, golden age, ordinary people, jesus
  • Invisible Man Identity - 1,075 words
    Invisible Man - Identity Invisible Man - Identity "Who the hell am I?" (Ellison 386) This question puzzled the invisible man, the unidentified, anonymous narrator of Ralph Ellison's acclaimed novel Invisible Man. Throughout the story, the narrator embarks on a mental and physical journey to seek what the narrator believes is "true identity," a belief quite mistaken, for he, although unaware of it, had already been inhabiting true identities all along. The narrator's life is filled with constant eruptions of mental traumas. The biggest psychological burden he has is his identity, or rather his misidentity. He feels "wearing on the nerves" (Ellison 3) for people to see him as what they like to ...
    Related: invisible, invisible man, southern university, american mind, bother
  • Invisible Man Identity - 1,091 words
    ... lack Like Me demonstrated the interchangeability of identities and its effects. For himself, a white man, to understand how it is like to be black, he decides to "become a Negro" (Griffon 8) By simply darkening his skin with a medication, he gives up his life as a privileged white southerner, and"walks into a life that appears suddenly mysterious and frightening" (Griffon 9). Similarly the narrator steps into a life of northern privileges he could only dream of when he was in the South. Probably "it was the clothes and the new name and the circumstances" (Ellison 328) which is so unfamiliar to the narrator that causes him to feel so different, and so strange, leading him into believing t ...
    Related: invisible, invisible man, works cited, human beings, occasion
  • Lsd - 1,883 words
    LSD Despite the negative portrayal in mainstream 1960s media, justifications expressed by counterculture activists for further investigation, education and experimentation under government control of LSD were rational and valid arguments. Sex, drugs, protests, war, political upheaval, cultural chaos, and social rebellion; the many comforts TV dinner eating, republican voting, church going, suburbia conformists tried to escape through conservative ideals, town meetings, and The Andy Williams Family Hour. National consciousness in 1960s United States was alive, but existed differently in every mind it dwelled, and stirred uninterrupted in every life to which it was introduced. A dream of money ...
    Related: wright brothers, art education, american dream, rebellion
  • Marilyn Manson - 1,818 words
    Marilyn Manson Marilyn Manson: Pushing the 1st Amendment Marilyn Manson is a name that has been a thorn in the side of society as a moral and ethical issue for the parents and kids of the generation X. He is one of the most controversial artists in the world today, one who chooses to express himself in a way that provokes in the most extreme methods possible. His methods are bizarre and shunned by most of society, as it cannot fathom what he is trying to accomplish. However, further research into his life and beliefs will explain that he is sending a very strong message to the world. A message that is firmly protect by the First Amendment in the American Constitution. This freedom has unleas ...
    Related: charles manson, manson, marilyn, marilyn monroe, christian faith
  • Roaring Twenties - 1,543 words
    Roaring Twenties Do you ever find yourself wondering why the 1920s were called the Roaring Twenties? The Roaring Twenties was a celebration of youth and culture. During the 1920s, many different forms of art, music, and literature began. There were many changes that took place in the 1920s, and many people were influenced by these changes. The Roaring Twenties was a constant party because America was celebrating the victory of World War I. Many customs and values changed in the United States in the 1920s. In the 19th century right before 1920, America was a country of small towns and farms that were held together by conservative moral values and close social relationships. The middle-class r ...
    Related: roaring, roaring twenties, twenties, king oliver, york city
  • The Us Constitution - 1,063 words
    The U.S. Constitution Article Five, clause two of the United States Constitution states, "under the Authority of the United States, [the Constitution] shall be the supreme law of the land." As a result of the fact that the current activist government is pursuing inconsistent policies, many believe the Constitution has become irrelevant because no guiding principles seem to exist. Thomas Jefferson once said, "The Constitution belongs to the living and not to the dead." Accordingly, it is often referred to as a "living" document because of its regular alteration and reexamination; therefore, the Constitution has not become irrelevant in defining the goals of American government. This will be s ...
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  • Was Colonial Culture Uniquely American - 1,225 words
    "Was Colonial Culture Uniquely American?" "There were never, since the creation of the world, two cases exactly parallel." Lord Chesterfield, in a letter to his son, February 22nd, 1748. Colonial culture was uniquely American simply because of the unique factors associated with the development of the colonies. Never before had the conditions that tempered the colonists been seen. The unique blend of diverse environmental factors and peoples caused the development of a variety of cultures that were mostly English, part European, and altogether original. The unique conditions, both cultural and environmental, of each colony produced a unique culture for that colony. And while each colony had i ...
    Related: african culture, american, american history, american mind, american revolution, colonial, colonial america
  • What Is An American - 973 words
    What Is An American What Does "American Mean?" Webster's Dictionary defines American as or its inhabitants. But is that all America and an American truly is? Is a person American simply because of geography? According to Identities, "America is a confluence of cultures." Americans are people whose lives depict men and women who are trying to be as successful and robust as possible, this quest is symbolic to citizens of many other countries. This is why America illustrates the Statue of Liberty, a structure that symbolizes freedom throughout the world. America is composed not only of these peoples, but the cultures and the ways of life of these people. The Statue of Liberty symbolizes a fearl ...
    Related: american, american identity, american lives, american mind, political issues
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