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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: family structure

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  • Aids In Africa - 1,109 words
    Aids In Africa As recently as 1990, there were some regions of the world that had remained relatively unscathed by AIDS. Today, however, there is not a single country around the world which has wholly escaped the AIDS epidemic. As the epidemic has matured, some of the developed nations which were hard hit by the epidemic in the 1980s such as the United States have reported a slowing in the rate of new infections and a stabilization among existing cases with lower mortality rates and an extension of post-diagnosis lifespan. However, despite the changing face of the global AIDS pandemic, one factor remains unchanged: no region of the world bears a higher AIDS-related burden than sub-Saharan Af ...
    Related: africa, aids, aids epidemic, east africa, saharan africa, sub-saharan africa, west africa
  • Aids In Africa - 1,093 words
    ... condoms and/or other barrier contraceptives, and reduced sexual frequency (Zaba & Gregson, 1998; Gregson, et al., 1999). Biological and behavioral factors among HIV+ men may also impact the fertility rates. In general, researchers have noted that biological factors, including reduced sperm count and reduced frequency of sexual activity related to physical illness, have been more important than behavioral factors (condom use, etc.) when examining males' contributions to the declining fertility rates (Zaba & Gregson, 1998). Orphanhood & Early Childhood Mortality. The data on child mortality and AIDS are more confusing. There is no doubt that AIDS has had a devastating impact on children i ...
    Related: africa, aids, aids epidemic, aids prevention, foreign aid, saharan africa, sub-saharan africa
  • American Racism - 1,745 words
    American Racism American Racism Society In Nathan McCall's "Makes Me Wanna Holler," he describes the difficulties he must face as a young black boy experiencing the slow, never-ending process of the integration of blacks and whites. Through this process, his autobiography serves as an excellent example of my theory on the formation and definition of racial identity; a theory which is based upon a combination of the claims which Stuart Hall and George Lipsitz present in their essays regarding racial identity. Therefore the definition I have concocted is one in which racial identity consists of an unstable historical process through which one comes to know themselves in relation to an outside ...
    Related: african american, american, american society, american studies, racism
  • Applied Nostalgia - 2,248 words
    Applied Nostalgia Applied Nostalgia--A Parental Look Back Without past memories, Americans lack a standard to base present conditions upon. These memories lie carefully shuffled and categorized in the giant shifter called the brain to crudely approximate the present standard of life. They hope to draw gratification and fulfillment in the progression of the quality of their and especially their children's lives. This innate desire to compare the past to the present drives personal and political decisions, especially conservatives who advocate a change to the policies and values of the past. Today, the faded memories of an emerging group of parents of their post-World War II upbringing, like c ...
    Related: last year, equal rights, world war ii, prepare, california
  • As The 1800s Came To A Close The Calendar Was Not The Only - 921 words
    As the 1800's came to a close the calendar was not the only thing which was changing. The tirn of the century also saw a radical change in the ways in which Americans conducted their lives. No more were people's lives based around farms in small rural neighborhoods. Instead people moved into the cities, and factories started sprouting up in every major urban area. However, the industrialization of America also brought with it problems which hurt many Americans. The People most hurt by these new problems called themselves the Progressives. This new political group tried to "recapture" America by attacking a myriad of political issues. These issues differed in almost every facet, however the P ...
    Related: calendar, medical association, american political, christian temperance union, unite
  • Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism Comparison - 553 words
    Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism Comparison Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism Comparison Essay There are many similarities and differences between the three ways of life we have been studying for the past week. Each has its own unique purpose and type of people. Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism all have similar and different qualities. I will explain similarities and differences in this essay. The basic beliefs and concepts of Confucianism are similar to Taoism in the sense that they want peace and good behavior. The Buddhists, on the other hand, strictly have the purpose to reach Nirvana and follow the four noble truths. The overall goal of Confucian is different than Buddhism and Taoism becau ...
    Related: comparison, confucianism, taoism & confucianism, eightfold path, family structure
  • Confucianism And Its Implications In Modern China - 1,645 words
    ... sense, America already has this, the process of impeachment. It is this way that China should look at this. The idea of rebelling is wrong, but making sure that the government is benevolent towards the people is excellent. What the previous quote in essence is saying is that the people, if ethical and moral, will love the government; if it is not, then it will be despised. The Confucian idea is that its people will love a government that loves and takes care of its people. One that does not, will not. These values are still prevalent today, though they need to be expanded upon in China. China needs to expand on the ideas of human rights. Confucianism is not simply the advocacy of obedien ...
    Related: china, china trade, confucianism, modern china, modern world, south china
  • Consequences And Cause Of Refugees - 592 words
    Consequences And Cause Of Refugees Refugees are persons who have fled their country or been expelled from it and cannot or will not return, because of natural catastrophe, war or military occupation, or fear of religious, racial, or political persecution. Although refugees have existed throughout human history, the problem has assumed more importance in the 20th century. It is estimated that more than one hundred million persons have left their home country, since the outbreak of World War II. According to the United Nations High Commissioner for refugees, the outstanding world refugee total exceeded twenty-six million in 1996. Deprived of the protection of their state, often detached from t ...
    Related: nations high commissioner, middle east, russian jews, kuwait, plight
  • Cultural Relativism: Is Truth Defined By Our Culture Or Our Culture By Truth - 1,597 words
    Cultural Relativism: Is Truth Defined By Our Culture Or Our Culture By Truth? In his article "Cultural relativism and cultural values", Melville Herkovits defines the principle of cultural relativism as "judgements are based on experience, and experience is interpreted by each individual in terms of his own enculturation" (26). This is the basic premise of cultural relativism, that beliefs, values, and morals are all based on one's culture. Therefore, since morality is based on society and different societies have different views of right and wrong, there can be no moral absolutes. Since there are no absolutes, under this view of cultural relativism all moral views determined by one's cultur ...
    Related: african culture, american culture, cultural relativism, cultural values, western culture
  • Cultural Shock - 1,305 words
    Cultural Shock The stories that are told in Distant Mirrors reflect how people can be so comfortable with the way they live that they will never realize what is around them. This does not happen unless they take the initiative to research the"outside world." I focused on three stories. These three stories share in the fact that when the person researched a new culture they were in awe of the differences and similarities that they found. Plainly put, these anthropologists underwent a culture shock; "disorientation experienced by a person suddenly to an unfamiliar culture." Each anthropologist migrated to America in order to compare and contrast their culture to a country with all types of cul ...
    Related: american cultural, cross cultural, cultural values, culture shock, shock
  • Culture Through Generations - 521 words
    Culture Through Generations Culture Through Generations This essay will explain how I learned culture through generations of my family. The first thing I noticed when analyzing my chart is that there has been considerable migration through generations of my family. My family came from Europe to Central America , because they had made investments there which was their initial reason for leaving Spain. My parents generation left Central America for political reasons which lead them to financial disaster. Opportunity, can be said is the reason why generations of my families have lived in the Americas. Cultural values in my family are still rooted to those which exist in Spain. When they first c ...
    Related: family structure, central america, european community, precedent, neighborhoods
  • Deviance In Gangs - 1,751 words
    ... from beatings to even death. In an attempt to enter into a family hierarchy, many youths will choose gangs as a substitute family. That of a "functional" family in gangs replaces the dysfunctional family that many of these youths arrive from. The gang provides support and even love that may be lacking at the homes of many of these youths. Furthermore, the gang also provides something that is also not easy to come by for many of these youths. That thing being money. Financial opportunities are very abundant in the gang lifestyle. These opportunities are much more lucrative than part time jobs. However, these opportunities do not come without drawbacks, as some of them are extremely danger ...
    Related: deviance, gang violence, research center, risky business, trump
  • Divorce And Children - 1,631 words
    Divorce And Children Divorce: Effects on Children Divorce has become an unquestionable remedy for the miserably married. Currently, the United States has the highest divorce rate in the world. Every year in the US approximately one million children experience divorce which, is about one in every three children (Amato 21). The effects of divorce can be tremendously painful for both children and adults. Children of divorce are more likely to suffer from behavioral, social, academic, and psychological problems than children raised in two-parent families. The actual separation of the family will be the initial crisis that a child must deal with but many issues such as economic hardship, moving, ...
    Related: divorce, divorce and children, divorce rate, effects of divorce, parental divorce
  • Divorce And Children, Affects Of - 1,388 words
    Divorce And Children, Affects Of The Affects of Divorce on Children As a child, there are many things that affect a view, memory, opinion, or attitude. Children have many of their own daily struggles to cope with, as peer pressures are an example. As an adult, we sometimes forget what it is like to be a child dealing with some of the childhood pressures. Many parents do not realize how something like divorce could possibly affect their children as much as it does themselves. As the case may be, children are strongly affected by divorce. Some react differently than do others, but all experience some kind of emotional change. Exposure to a highly stressful major life change event on children, ...
    Related: divorce, divorce and children, effects of divorce, parental divorce, adverse effects
  • Duty,pride, And Merit In Thomas Manns Buddenbrooks - 1,239 words
    Duty,Pride, And Merit In Thomas Mann's Buddenbrooks Ana Coleman October 11, 2001 History 225 Theories of Familial Duty in Thomas Mann's Buddenbrooks The novel Buddenbrooks was written by Thomas Mann in 1901. He was born in 1875, soon after the unification of Germany. He wrote several books, short stories, and essays for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. With the advent of World War II, Mann left Germany and lived the rest of his life in San Diego until his death in 1955. Mann's novel, Buddenbrooks takes place in Lubeck, (Northern Germany) from 1835 until roughly 1875-76. The novel opens with the Buddenbrook family having a dinner party. It is a sort of housewarming party fo ...
    Related: merit, thomas mann, social class, family business, tooth
  • Eating - 1,197 words
    ... situations. They also felt insecure about their body shape and size (Bulik, Beidel, & Duchmann, 1991, p. 210~. Another study shows that depression, anxiety, and hostility all are associated with bulimic behavior (Rebert, Stanton, & Schwarz, 1991, p. 500). The young student who experiences extreme mood swings attempts to control the emotions through a destructive cycle of overeating and purging for relief and release. One study shows that students with eating disorders are likely to come from dysfunctional families but raises the question about why some people adapt to such stress in other ways and do not become overeaters or undereaters. The severity of the eating difficulty was apparent ...
    Related: eating disorder, eating disorders, sex roles, personality inventory, texas
  • Edward Albee, The American Dream - 1,196 words
    Edward Albee, The American Dream Edward Albee's, "The American Dream" Edward Albee is considered by many to be one of the most influential playwrights of the seventeenth century. Albee wrote his plays around the typical themes associated with the American drama. They were not just plays about family life; instead, they frequently focused on family dysfunctions and the underlying motives of family structure. In his works, Albee portrays many of the concepts of the absurdism movement that had begun in Europe after World War II. This movement was a reaction to the many injustices brought along with the war itself. One of the major motifs present is the idea that the playwright possessed little ...
    Related: american, american drama, american dream, american society, dream, edward
  • Family Meet The Simpsons - 1,683 words
    Family - Meet The Simpsons Meet the Simpsons Over time, the definition of what exactly family means has changed with time. Usually, what constitutes making up a family is relative to a specific culture, but as always, there are exceptions to the rule. Ever since the golden age of television had sprung upon American culture, television has tried to mimic the ideal American family through it's programming. Even as early as the 1950's, television producers made programming that would represent what exactly the ideal American family was. Take for example the show Leave It to Beaver. While I am not going to go in detail about each character, I am going to summarize the family structure and the ro ...
    Related: american family, family life, family member, family structure, family ties, homer simpson, simpsons
  • Family Ties: John Steinbecks The Grapes Of Wrath - 599 words
    Family Ties: John Steinbeck's The Grapes Of Wrath In John Steinbecks The Grapes of Wrath, the most important elements are family structure and the familys connection to the land. The Joad family must stay together for support and happiness. They also have a strong tie to their homeland that affects every aspect of their lives. Steinbeck exemplifies the family support primarily through the character of Ma Joad. She holds the family together. In Steinbecks description of Ma Joad, he states, She seemed to know, to accept, to welcome her position, the citadel of the family, the strong place that could not be taken. . . . She seemed to know that if she swayed the family shook, and if she ever rea ...
    Related: family structure, family ties, grapes of wrath, john steinbeck, the grapes of wrath, wrath
  • Family Values - 373 words
    Family Values Throughout the history of mankind, family structure, values and qualities were fairly well remained. However, in todays society, due to lack of religion and morality among other things, the family value system is rapidly failing. Our society must emphasize the good values of the traditional family. Poverty, crime, and declining school performance are three of the greatest concern that can be attributed to children being raised in untraditional families. When parents divorce, instead of having the income from two people, there is now only income from one person. This often causes a once middle class family to become a lower class family. Also because of our nations poverty, bill ...
    Related: family structure, family values, traditional family, more violent, standard of living
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