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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: familiarity

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  • A Lesson From Oliver - 5,261 words
    ... had little wish to draw him into this conversation. I decided to change the subject quickly. "Coincidentally, yes sir. Why I'm calling, though, is to inquire about the number of outboard motors that have gone missing since last week." "Pardon me?" The tone of his voice took a sudden sinister turn that sent a twinge through my bladder. Like the rookie I was, I had made some as yet unrecognized blunder. I felt the strong urge to conclude the interview immediately, but it was too late. He knew my name. He knew my brother's name. He knew why I'd called. He knew everything. I'd have to bluff past my own ignorance. "Well, I was wondering if the police suspected some kind of theft ring being i ...
    Related: lesson, oliver, crime scene, media coverage, nash
  • Agricultural Crisis - 1,233 words
    Agricultural Crisis The Agricultural Crisis: Crisis of Culture In this novel by Wendell Berry, Berry's describes in his thesis that modern culture is destroying the agricultural culture. He feels that technology is seen as the easy way to produce food faster and more efficiently. With this modern way of farming comes the idea that hard work is not needed to make a living. The goal is comfort and leisure. Berry feels that this is the reason for the deterioration of the agricultural culture. He believes that hard work and pride in workmanship is more important than material goods and money. This was by no means a perfect society. The people had often been violent wand wasteful in the use of la ...
    Related: agricultural, crisis, military force, young children, displacement
  • Analysis Of A Drawing For Art His Class - 1,321 words
    Analysis Of A Drawing For Art His Class Analysis of 'Chance Meeting' by Martin Lewis 'Chance Meeting' is a dry point etching print by Martin Lewis and was created in the early 1930's. The subjects are two figures, male and female, who have happened upon each other in the setting of a public sidewalk at the entrance of a storefront. It may be a dichotomy in terms to call the piece, Idealized Urban Realism, though Lewis' work does harmonize well with the Urban Realist movement surfacing in this period with artists such as Edward Hopper. It also has a very idealized and stylistic quality not unlike the work of artists like Roy Liechtenstein in a much later time period. At a glance, 'Chance Meet ...
    Related: drawing, urban america, young woman, edward hopper, symbolism
  • Antibiotics And Children - 1,429 words
    Antibiotics And Children A very important issue concerning the children of today is the excess prescribing of antibiotics and the dangers that are being created. Everyday, more and more children are being prescribed any easy solution to a very tough problem. There is a constant push from pharmaceutical companies, parents, and massive marketing companies to try the next antibiotic remedy, but as we look towards the future and the diseases that can be created by this quick fix, we should turn to our attention to alternatives remedies. What is so terrible about this situation is that the worst-case scenario of the effects of the mass doses of antibiotics they ingest is an untreatable bacterium ...
    Related: drug administration, immune system, bubonic plague, letting, pneumonia
  • Bartelby The Scrivener By Melville - 1,187 words
    Bartelby The Scrivener By Melville All literary works are written from a specific standpoint. This standpoint originates from the mind of the author. The author, when creating his literary work, has a specific diagram/plan and vision of what the story is supposed to convey. However, not all readers will interpret the literary work in the way that the author him/herself has presented it. Many times, in fact, the audience will perceive the literary work as having an entirely different meaning than what it was meant to have. The short story, Bartelby the Scrivener by Herman Melville, has been reviewed by several different critics as having several different standpoints. These standpoints includ ...
    Related: herman melville, melville, scrivener, the narrator, common sense
  • Bill Howe The Printing Press Vital Yesterday And Today I Believe That Everyone Has Heard The Phrase, The Pen Is Mightier Than - 1,087 words
    Bill Howe THE PRINTING PRESS - VITAL YESTERDAY AND TODAY I believe that everyone has heard the phrase, "The pen is mightier than the sword." This statement I cannot argue, but the point I want to make is that the printing press is the mightiest of them all. The origin of printing itself was only the first stage in the development of books as we know them. To understand the modern book, one should know of its history and realize the gradual process it came from since the pre-written manuscript. THERE WERE FOUR DISTINCT PHASES IN THIS METAMORPHOSIS (Butler xi). 1. In the beginning, this was just a means for performing a writer's work more quickly, neatly, and cheaply than was possible by hand ...
    Related: howe, printing, printing press, vital, yesterday
  • Blowing Smoke - 1,337 words
    Blowing Smoke Blowing Smoke In the United States today, more than forty six million Americans are addicted to cigarettes. More people have died due to cigarette smoking than from narcotic drugs, World Wars I and II, and the Vietnam War combined (Bailey 1). The annual death toll for cigarette smoking is more than four-hundred thousand Americans a year, and is the number-one preventable cause of death in the United States. If Americans are aware of the lethal effects of smoking, why is it still so popular? Guy Smith, a Phillip Morris Tobacco Company executive, claims that their research shows that advertising is the top reason people start smoking (Bailey 34). Most people will argue that this ...
    Related: blowing, smoke, televised sports, target audience, friendly
  • Buford V, United States - 811 words
    Buford V, United States Brief of BUFORD v. UNITED STATES Certiorari to the united states court of appeals for the seventh circuit No. 99-9073. Argued January 8, 2001--Decided March 20, 2001 TYPE OF CASE. This case has to deal with the certiorari (Latin for "to be informed") from the United States Court of appeals for the seventh district. This case raises a question of the sentencing laws. What is the standard of review as it applies when a court of appeals reviews a trial court's Sentencing Guideline determination as to whether an offender's prior convictions were consolidated, hence "related," for purposes of sentencing? In particular, should the appeals court review the trial court's deci ...
    Related: state court, states constitution, states court, united states constitution, united states court
  • Buyer Behaviour - 3,094 words
    ... ers. Social surroundings such as the person that the students are with will either increase or decrease search. Health Supplements As decision making for purchasing for health supplements is a very low involvement activity, the consumers may recall their past experiences. The consumer purchases the recalled brand, and habitual decision-making has occurred. For example, a student who has an allergy problem may recall the previous brand of allergy relief they have used previously, therefore the allergy relief is purchased at the nearest store without further information search or evaluation. In other cases, when students have a different health problem to what they have before, they will s ...
    Related: behaviour, buyer, consumer behaviour, long term memory, customer service
  • Camelot: The Archetypal Environment - 1,298 words
    Camelot: The Archetypal Environment In Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the setting plays an integral role in the meaning of the poem. The three settings are all inseparable from the events which take place there and the manner in which Gawain is affected by the inhabitants. Camelot, Lord Bertilak's castle and the Green Chapel and their characters are considerably distinct from each other, each affecting and appealing to Gawain in a particular way. Because of its many positive qualities and familiarity, ultimately, the most attractive and appealing setting is Camelot. Lord Bertilak's castle has several positive aspects but is not the most appealing because most of these elements are deceptiv ...
    Related: round table, sir gawain and the green knight, roman empire, cleft, alternate
  • Carson Mccullers - 1,564 words
    Carson McCullers "With poignant insight and compassion Carson McCullers (1917-1967) wrote of human loneliness, unfulfilled love, and the frailty of the human heart." Of all the characters in the work of Carson McCullers, the one who seemed to her family and friends to be most like the author herself was Frankie Addams: the vulnerable, exasperating, and endearing adolescent of The Member of the Wedding who was looking for the "we of me." However, Carson once said that was, or became in the process of writing, all the characters in her work. This is probable true of most real writers who often with pain draw from their unconscious what the rest of us would just as soon keep hidden from ourselv ...
    Related: carson, carson mccullers, twentieth century, tennessee williams, eliot
  • Catch 22 - 1,169 words
    Catch 22 Heller's principle emphasis is on the internal struggle with conflicting values and the characters' evolution. He creates a quandary that Yossarian explores throughout the novel, and establishes Yossarian's world as one turned upside down by war. After exploring this chaotic condition and the mess it creates on people's values, Yossarian finally arrives at his decision to withdraw from the conflict. In the first half of the war, Yossarian runs. As he comes to terms with himself, he takes responsibility and explores life beyond himself. Identifying his adversary after careful reasoning, Yossarian names the enemy as 'anybody who's going to get you killed, no matter which side he's on. ...
    Related: catch, catch 22, first half, young woman, irony
  • Chance Meeting By Martin Lewis - 1,311 words
    "Chance Meeting" By Martin Lewis 'Chance Meeting' is a dry point etching print by Martin Lewis and was created in the early 1930's. The subjects are two figures, male and female, who have happened upon each other in the setting of a public sidewalk at the entrance of a storefront. It may be a dichotomy in terms to call the piece, "Idealized Urban Realism," though Lewis' work does harmonize well with the Urban Realist movement surfacing in this period with artists such as Edward Hopper. It also has a very idealized and stylistic quality not unlike the work of artists like Roy Liechtenstein in a much later time period. At a glance, 'Chance Meeting' is a simple work intended to tell a story wit ...
    Related: lewis, martin, young woman, edward hopper, cast
  • Child Eyewitness Testimony - 1,021 words
    Child Eyewitness Testimony In the last forty years, there has been a shift in courtroom proceedings. Lawyers are not only focusing their evidence on the scientific aspects of an event, but also on those who may have witnessed the actual event as well. Recently, the number of eyewitness appearances in the courtroom has increased, making statements about either a crime or an event that occurred in their presence. But how does the courtroom decide who is a legitimate witness to an event? Too often, age, race, education, and socio-economics play a major role in this decision. Here, we will discuss the age aspect of this problem in terms of child eyewitness testimony and it's implications in the ...
    Related: eyewitness, eyewitness testimony, testimony, knowledge base, the courtroom
  • Citizen Competence In A Democracy - 1,517 words
    Citizen Competence In A Democracy Citizens tend to make political decisions that are affected by their understanding of political institutions. People with a full understanding of political institutions have conceptual maps of the world that are less uncertain. Without this knowledge people see economic and social change as more uncertain and unexplainable. Any discussion of citizen competence must acknowledge the importance of political knowledge in helping people to evaluate politicians and policies. Citizens limited knowledge of political institutions and the effect on their world-views are particularly strong because Americans have little knowledge about their own government and the inst ...
    Related: citizen, competence, democracy, role playing, national survey
  • Comparative Politics - 2,347 words
    Comparative Politics Comparative Politics, typically defined as the study of the internal politics of nations other than our own, is a diverse and complex field. There is no one central tendency or approach which dominates this area of inquiry within political science: various theories, concepts, issues and methodologies are evident in the field. While it is recognized that no simple classification can be made of the literature, we are encouraged to be aware of contrasting approaches, and to engage in constructively critical ,thinking about the field. For the purposes of study, there should first be general familiarity with the history and evolution of the field. This would comprise knowledg ...
    Related: comparative, comparative politics, congress party, hong kong, constituent
  • Conservation And Preservation Of The Pompeiian Architecture - 1,866 words
    Conservation And Preservation Of The Pompeiian Architecture The ancient Roman city of Pompeii was buried by a volcano in 79 AD. That should be enough to destroy any town, but the city's buildings were in fact protected by this coating of ash, and although it would never be inhabited again, it now bears witness to an incredible period of history. For thousands of years, the city lay virtually undisturbed, and protected from the elements and erosion. Excavations carried out over the last centuries have allowed the city to be once again buzzing with people, and even if this notion may appear romantic, the city is also affected by the elements once again, and that is a major problem. Since it wa ...
    Related: architecture, conservation, preservation, acid rain, world war ii
  • Conservation And Preservation Of The Pompeiian Architecture - 1,858 words
    ... hat the structure looked like two thousand years ago. So it is mostly educated guess work on their part. But when it comes to post-1980 (after the earthquake), every thing can be restored back to the original state since its appearance is well documented. In the case of painted coating, it is a little more complicated. It is now easy to restore painted coating in labs, but the in situ restorations are still very hard to do. We must start with restoring the wall itself, working from the outside of the wall which is usually in worst shape. The method that seems to give the best results is the injection of a solution that will regenerate the ancient mortar instead of replacing it. Solvents ...
    Related: architecture, conservation, preservation, world heritage, university press
  • Crucible Tale Of Trials - 1,164 words
    ... ious decisions, though, the government powered by theocracy had undermined both the people's rights and their privacy. One civilization taken by madness is harrowing enough, but the real-life drama that submerged Salem Village and left its people in a state of hysteria was unfortunately to be repeated in almost parallel form. Indeed, the similarities between the HUAC trials in the 1950s and the Salem witch trials as portrayed in The Crucible are horrifying. Both trials were initiated by individuals who called out the guiltiness of others in order to somehow better their own positions in society. Abigail Williams and her friends went against the conformity of their Puritan religion, which ...
    Related: crucible, salem witch trials, tale, the crucible, witch trials
  • Dickinson 389 - 846 words
    Dickinson #389 Emily Dickinson (#389) The speaker in Dickinsons poem is noticeably outside the main action of the poem. The first line makes that clear: Theres been a Death, in the Opposite House. Dickinson creates a patchwork story that the reader and speaker create through Dickinsons poem, based on outside clues and speculation. In Dickinsons poem, each stanza has a central focus; the focus is an action or an image, each one providing more certainty to the belief that there has been a death. These images and actions lead up to the eventual, haunting realization that there will be a funeral procession. Dickinson also cleverly plays with words, puns, and sound associations. The attitude and ...
    Related: dickinson, emily dickinson, small town, comfort, corpse
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