Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: fall of the house of usher

  • 36 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Edgar Allan Poes The Fall Of The House Of Usher - 1,193 words
    Edgar Allan Poe`S The Fall Of The House Of Usher The Fall of the House of Usher Edgar Allan Poe wrote, "The Fall of the House of Usher", using characterization, and imagery to depict fear, terror, and darkness on the human mind. Roderick and his twin sister, Madeline, are the last of the all time-honored House of Usher (Jacobs and Roberts, pg. 462). They are both suffering from rather strange illnesses, which may be attributed to the intermarriage of the family. Roderick suffers from "a morbid acuteness of the senses"(464), while Madeline's illness is characterized by " a settled apathy, a gradual wasting away of the person, and frequent all though transient affections of a partly cataleptic ...
    Related: allan, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, fall of the house of usher, madeline usher, roderick usher
  • Fall Of The House Of Usher By Egar Allen Poe - 447 words
    Fall Of The House Of Usher By Egar Allen Poe Will Lewis "The Fall of the House of Usher" The story starts out with the narrator riding up to an old and gloomy house. He stresses that the overall persona of the house is very eerie. The reason he is at this house is because he received a letter from an old friend by the name of Roderick Usher. Roderick and the narrator were intimate friend at a young age but they had not spoken to each other in several years. The narrator examined the house for a great time as he rode toward the house, he noticed that the house had been severely neglected over time. That the house's beautiful woodwork and Gothic type of architecture have not been maintenance t ...
    Related: allen, fall of the house of usher, roderick usher, usher, book reports
  • Imagry In The Fall Of The House Of Usher - 1,376 words
    Imagry In The Fall Of The House Of Usher Imagery in The Fall of the House of Usher The description of the landscape in any story is important as it creates a vivid imagery of the scene and helps to develop the mood. Edgar Allan Poe is a master at using imagery to improve the effects of his stories. He tends to use the landscapes to symbolize some important aspect of the story. Also, he makes use of the landscape to produce a supernatural effect and to induce horror. In particular, Poe makes great use of these tools in The Fall of the House of Usher. This story depends on the portrayal of the house itself to create a certain atmosphere and to relate to the Usher family. In The Fall of the Hou ...
    Related: fall of the house of usher, madeline usher, roderick usher, usher, mental disorder
  • Mockery Of Transcendentalism In The Fall Of The House Of Usher - 1,320 words
    Mockery Of Transcendentalism In The Fall Of The House Of Usher Edgar Allan Poes Mockery of Transcendentalism in The Fall of the House of Usher Throughout the development of our culture there have been a large number of literary movements. From existentialism to naturalism, humanism to surrealism, they all play an important role in the development of the literature we read today. One important movement during the nineteenth century is known as the transcendentalist movement. Transcendentalism is a form of idealism. In philosophy and literature, it is the belief in a higher reality than that found in sense experience or in a higher kind of knowledge than that achieved by human reason. Nearly a ...
    Related: fall of the house of usher, madeline usher, mockery, roderick usher, transcendentalism, usher
  • The Fall Of The House Of Usher - 1,383 words
    The Fall of the House of Usher Edgar Allan Poe wrote, "The Fall of the House of Usher", using characterization, and imagery to depict fear, terror, and darkness on the human mind. Roderick and his twin sister, Madeline, are the last of the all time-honored House of Usher (Jacobs and Roberts, pg. 462). They are both suffering from rather strange illnesses, which may be attributed to the intermarriage of the family. Roderick suffers from "a morbid acuteness of the senses"( Jacobs and Roberts, pg. 464), while Madelines illness is characterized by " a settled apathy, a gradual wasting away of the person, and frequent all though transient affections of a partly cataleptical character"(Jacobs and ...
    Related: fall of the house of usher, madeline usher, roderick usher, usher, mental disorder
  • The Fall Of The House Of Usher - 1,377 words
    ... he "rank sedges," and the "black and lurid tarn," in which he sees the reflection of the house. He later says, "when I again uplifted my eyes to the house itself, from its image in the pool, there grew a strange fancy..."(665). Although the narrator tries to view everything he sees in a rational manner, upon seeing the house and its surroundings, he has a heightened sense of superstition. He goes on to say that, "about the whole mansion and domain there hung an atmosphere peculiar to themselves and their immediate vicinity" (666). This statement indicates that perhaps the house does indeed have supernatural characteristic. The narrator observes the details of the house once more and find ...
    Related: fall of the house of usher, roderick usher, usher, the narrator, utterly
  • The Fall Of The House Of Usher - 1,024 words
    The Fall Of The House Of Usher Death is defined as, The termination or extinction of something. Edgar Allen Poe uses this description in The Fall of the House of Usher in different ways. Poe's intention when writing The Fall of the House of Usher was not to present a moral, lesson, or truth to the reader; he was simply trying to bring forth a sense of terror to the reader. Poe's mind works this way, and critics believe this statement, especially when related to this story. Poe is grouped with other writers in the Romantic period. Writers of this period focused on life, emotions, and the existence of the human race. Although Poe's work has many characteristics of Romanticism, The Fall of the ...
    Related: fall of the house of usher, roderick usher, usher, human race, romantic period
  • The Fall Of The House Of Usher - 657 words
    The Fall Of The House Of Usher Regarded as his most famous piece of fiction, The Fall of the House of Usher inspires the usual horror found in most works by Poe. Every aspect expected from a Poe piece is found within this story. There is the first person narrative, the division of personality, and Gothic style; which all characterize classic Poe. Although some critics feel that the tale is difficult to read and an overdone and vulgar fantasy; most recognize it as the masterpiece it is. From the gloomy beginning to the shocking conclusion, The Fall of the House of Usher implements every attribute needed to create a model narration. As in most Poe stories, the unnamed narrator experiences a ho ...
    Related: fall of the house of usher, madeline usher, roderick usher, usher, william wilson
  • The Fall Of The House Of Usher By Edgar Allan Poe 1809 1849 - 1,506 words
    The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe (1809 - 1849) The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe (1809 - 1849) Type of Work: Gothic horror story Setting An ancient English manor house; nineteenth century Principal Characters An unidentified Narrator Roderick Usher, the Narrator's gravely ill friend Lady Madcline, Roderick's even more in firm sister Story Overveiw (Classical gothic imagery - drippingly dark surroundings and terrifying ghostly symbols - is used throughout this tale to evoke a sense of fear and forboding that present-day novels and films have made commonplace to modern lovers of horror. Thus, imagine yourself living in the relatively tranquil and circumscribed ...
    Related: allan, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, fall of the house of usher, roderick usher, usher
  • The Fall Of The House Of Usher: Setting - 733 words
    The Fall of the House of Usher: Setting The Fall of the House of Usher: Setting In the short story, "The Fall of the House of Usher," by Edgar Allen Poe, setting is used extensively to do many things. The author uses it to convey ideas, effects, and images. It establishes a mood and foreshadows future events. Poe communicates truths about the character through setting. Symbols are also used throughout to help understand the theme through the setting. Poe uses the setting to create an atmosphere in the reader's mind. He chose every word in every sentence carefully to create a gloomy mood. For example, Usher's house, its windows, bricks, and dungeon are all used to make a dismal atmosphere. Th ...
    Related: fall of the house of usher, the tempest, the narrator, roderick usher, tempest
  • Born In Boston In 1809, Edgar Poe Was Destined To Lead A Rather Somber And Brief Life, Most Of It - 1,157 words
    Born in Boston in 1809, Edgar Poe was destined to lead a rather somber and brief life, most of it a struggle against poverty. His mother died when Edgar was only two, his father already long disappeared. He was raised as a foster child in Virginia by Frances Allen and her husband John, a Richmond tobacco merchant. Poe later lived in Baltimore with his aunt, Maria Clemm and her daughter Virginia, whom he eventually married. The trio formed a household which moved to New York and then to Philadelphia, where they lived for about six years -- apparently the happiest, most productive years of his life. Of Poe's several Philadelphia homes, only this one survives. In 1844 they moved to New York, wh ...
    Related: boston, edgar, edgar allen, pulitzer prize, tale heart
  • Crystal Barrey - 1,429 words
    ... fective writing about topics he is familiar with. Poe is the poster child of Ernest Hemmingways philosophy: "Only write about what you know, and then dont write too damn much." Another theme that frequents Poes literature, is the presence of a female. She is generally portrayed sympathetically and for the most part is dead, or dies in the course of the story. Ive already mentioned the "Black Cat", which features a young wife brutally murdered by her husband. "Murders in the Rue Morge" and "The Mystery of Marie Roget" were two detective style stories that featured women being killed. Yet, there can be no better example of Poes women issues as well as his own mental instability than in a s ...
    Related: crystal, william henry, cask of amontillado, francis bacon, tale
  • Dracula - 635 words
    Dracula Stoker was born November 8, 1847 at 15 The Crescent, Clontarf, North of Dublin, the third of seven children. For the first 7 years of his life Stoker was bedridden with a myriad of childhood diseases which afforded him much time to reading. By the time he went to college, Stoker had somehow overcome his childhood maladies and while at Trinity College, Dublin, the honor student was involved in soccer and was a marathon running champion. He was also involved in various literary and dramatic activities, a precursor to his later interests in the theater and his involvement with the rising action Henry Irving, whose performance he had critiqued as a student at Trinity. After graduation fr ...
    Related: dracula, daily mail, fall of the house of usher, short story, publication
  • Edgar - 734 words
    Edgar Allan Poe Many people have adored Edgar Allan Poes' writings and many have hated them. Overall Poe still appeals to a large audience today who enjoy the terror, the excitement, and the unique writing style he influenced and provided for readers all over the world. All around the world Poe influences in all types of writing,"For a moment I can see the importance and the influence Poe has had on three French poets, Baudelaire, Mallarme, and especially Paul Valery"(Thomas Stearns Eliot 206). Poes' influence upon the world was strong and important, introducing his own style, unique structure, and appealingness.Poe had a strong influence upon the developement of popular fiction and detectiv ...
    Related: edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, englewood cliffs, tale heart
  • Edgar Allan Poe - 1,226 words
    ... events are what gives his stories a scent of truth. In one particular case, Poe wrote a passage in his story of "Marginalia" that could only apply to a person such as himself: I have sometimes amused myself by endeavoring to fancy what would be the fate of any individual gifted, or rather accursed, with an intellect very far superior to that of his race. Of course, he would be conscious of his superiority; nor could he (if otherwise constituted as man is) help manifesting his consciousness. This he would make himself enemies at all points. And since his opinions and speculations would widely differ from those of all mankind - that he would be considered a madman, is evident. How horribly ...
    Related: allan, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, prentice hall
  • Edgar Allan Poe - 1,467 words
    Edgar Allan Poe When picking a topic for my research paper. I thought of many different ideas. I started to think about my interests is reading literature, and I decided to write about my favorite author Edgar Allan Poe. This paper is going to look at Poe from a psychological perspective. There seems to be few attempts to look at the psychological causes of humor in Poes work, and how his personal life may have had an impact on his writings. Many of Poes tales are distinguished by the authors unique grotesque ideas in addition to his superb plots. In an article titled Poes humor: A Psychological Analysis, by Paul Lewis, he states: Appropriately it seems to me, that to see Poe only as an elit ...
    Related: allan, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, john allan
  • Edgar Allan Poe - 1,429 words
    ... ive writing about topics he is familiar with. Poe is the poster child of Ernest Hemmingways philosophy: "Only write about what you know, and then dont write too damn much." Another theme that frequents Poes literature, is the presence of a female. She is generally portrayed sympathetically and for the most part is dead, or dies in the course of the story. Ive already mentioned the "Black Cat", which features a young wife brutally murdered by her husband. "Murders in the Rue Morge" and "The Mystery of Marie Roget" were two detective style stories that featured women being killed. Yet, there can be no better example of Poes women issues as well as his own mental instability than in a short ...
    Related: allan, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, john allan
  • Edgar Allan Poe Literary History - 692 words
    Edgar Allan Poe Literary History Numerous writers have made great contributions to the broad-spectrum of literature. Samuel Langhorne Clemens, also known as Mark Twain, introduced Americans to life on the Mississippi. Thomas Hardy wrote on his pessimistic perspectives of the Victorian Age. Another author that influenced literature tremendously is Edgar Allan Poe. Best known as the father of the American short story and father of the detective story. Poe immersed reader into a world of imagination and horrendous ecstasy. Poe was great in three different fields, and in each one he made a reputation that would give any man a high place in literary history. Poe wrote great short stories, famous ...
    Related: allan, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, history
  • Edgar Allan Poes Work - 763 words
    Edgar Allan Poe's Work Edgar Allan Poe's work is known throughout the world. He was born in 1809 in Boston. When Poe was still an infant his father left him and then his mother died. Poe was adopted by Jon Allan. Then Edgar Allan Poe was Educated in Europe. Poe attendant college for while, but Jon Allan stopped Paying for his college education because Poe had to many gambling depts. Then Poe joined to the army in 1827 he wasn't successful in the army though. Then Poe moved back to the United States and wrote stories in Baltimore. Poe was married to Virginia in 1836. Eleven years later Virginia dies of an Illness, Poe was very disturbed. In 1849 Poe died. Poe was known as the Father of Gothic ...
    Related: allan, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, male characters
  • Edgar Allen Poe - 2,429 words
    Edgar Allen Poe To be buried while alive is, beyond question, the most terrific of these extremes which has ever fallen to the lot of mere mortality. That it has frequently, very frequently, so fallen will scarcely be denied by those who think. The boundaries that divide life from death are at best shadowy and vague. Who shall say where the one ends, and where the other begins? Edgar Allan Poe often uses the motif of premature or concealed burials in his literary works. One such story is "The Cask of Amontillado." The story begins around dusk, one evening during the carnival season (similar to the Mardi Gras festival in New Orleans) in an unnamed European city. The location quickly changes f ...
    Related: allen, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, edgar allen
  • 36 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2