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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: expressionism

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  • Abstract Expressionism - 1,560 words
    Abstract Expressionism "What about the reality of the everyday world and the reality of painting? They are not the same realities. What is this creative thing that you have struggled to get and where did it come from? What reference or value does it have, outside of the painting itself?" Ad Reinhardt, in a group discussion at Studio 35, in 1950. My essay starts with the origin and the birth of this great expression in the twentieth century. This movement not only touched painting, it had an affect on various aspects of art- poetry, architecture, theater, film, photography. Vasily Kandinsky, Kazimir Malevich and Piet Mondrian are considered to be the pioneer artists to have achieved a truly a ...
    Related: abstract, abstract expressionism, expressionism, german expressionism, modern architecture
  • Expressionism Is A Much Less Important Current In Sculpture Than In Painting, Since The Ethnographic Sculpture By The Fauves - 1,580 words
    Expressionism is a much less important current in sculpture than in painting, since the ethnographic sculpture by the Fauves might have evoked a strong response among sculptors Only one important sculptor shared in this rediscovery Brancusi, a Rumanian, moved to Paris to study advanced art around 1904 But he was more interested in the formal simplicity and coherence of primitive carvings than in their savage expressiveness; this is evidenced in The Kiss which was executed in 1909 Brancusi had a 'genius of ommission' - to Brancusi a monument is an upright slab, symmetrical and immobile - a permanent marker like the styles of the ancients and he disturbed the basic shape as little as possible ...
    Related: ethnographic, expressionism, modern sculpture, sculpture, african culture
  • A Reflection On Paul Hindemith - 1,231 words
    A Reflection On Paul Hindemith Paul Hindemith was revolutionary and a musical genius. Many people who lived around the same time saw him as nothing more than an untalented noisemaker. Granted, these people didnt have all of the various forms of music that we have today, but untalented would not be a word I would use to describe Paul Hindemith. He helped begin the last great change in classical music from the Romantic Era, which was very tonal and diatonic, to 20th Century Modern Music, which is extremely atonal. Diatonic means within in the key. In other words, everything sounds nice and pretty. There are no weird noises, no funny pitches. Atonal itself is defined as the avoidance of the tra ...
    Related: reflection, emory university, heart attack, yale university, zurich
  • Adam Rehrig - 1,060 words
    Adam Rehrig Mr. Gardner TV 151 Term Paper Film Noir It is world of dark rooms with light slicing through venetian blinds, alleys cluttered with garbage, abandoned warehouses where dust hangs in the air, rain-slickened streets with water still running in the gutters, dark detective officers overlooking busy streets. These are the qualities that makes film noir a perfect blend of form and content, where the desperation and hopelessness of situations is reflected in the visual style, which drenches the world in shadows and has only a few occasional bursts of sunlight. Film noir, occasionally acerbic, usually cynical, often enthralling, gives us characters trying to elude some kind of mysterious ...
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  • Alternative Cinema - 1,558 words
    Alternative Cinema The term alternative cinema has certain connotations. To many, it is not alternative, instead it is the way cinema was meant to be viewed, in that the viewer should be able to define the film in their own personal terms. In the following essay, I will firstly examine what the term alternative cinema means, and secondly how Brechts theories are evident in many elements of the films that have been pigeon-holed as alternative cinema. The word alternative is described in Collins English Dictionary as: "Denoting a lifestyle, culture, art form, etc., regarded by its adherents as preferable to that of contemporary society because it is less conventional, materialistic, or institu ...
    Related: alternative energy, alternative medicine, cinema, united artists, german expressionism
  • Alternative Cinema - 1,482 words
    ... own reality. The actors use exaggerated gestures to externalise the characters emotions. The audience discovers the characters emotions without being sucked into the world that the characters inhabit. This style of acting was seen as a response to method acting, a style developed by Stanislavsky between 1910 and 1920 and taken up by actors such as Marlon Brando and Dustin Hoffman in modern cinema. German expressionism used the actors as an extension of the sets, making a psychological link between the two. The expressionist movement was clearly an alternative to the mainstream and was similar in many ways to Brechts epic theatre and in that respect can be called alternative cinema. Howe ...
    Related: cinema, world cinema, bertolt brecht, dustin hoffman, jean
  • American Impressionism - 954 words
    American Impressionism In the years following the Civil War, American art underwent a fundamental shift. The traditional Romantic style of painting, which focused on portraying majestic scenes in stark, vivid lines and shapes, gave way to a new concern for light and atmosphere. It was the age of Impressionism. Impressionism was not indigenous to America. In fact, its origins lay in France, which had long been at the fore of artistic innovation. The French Impressionists threw off the shackles of traditional painting in favor of an airier, lighter style. The purpose of Impressionism was to convey the impression of an object by capturing the patterns of light and color on and surrounding it. T ...
    Related: american, american art, american artists, early american, great american, impressionism
  • Andy Worhal - 1,891 words
    Andy Worhal Andy Worhal Andy Warhol, the American painter, printmaker, illustrator, and film maker was born in Pittsburgh on August 6, 1928, shortly afterwards settling in New York. The only son of immigrant, Czech parents, Andy finished high school and went on to the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh, graduating in 1949 with hopes of becoming an art teacher in the public schools. While in Pittsburgh, he worked for a department store arranging window displays, and often was asked to simply look for ideas in fashion magazines . While recognizing the job as a waste of time, he recalls later that the fashion magazines "gave me a sense of style and other career opportunities." Upon ...
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  • Changes In Pop Art - 946 words
    Changes In Pop Art "Changes in Pop Art" "Pop art" was a 20th century art movement that utilized consumerism and popular culture. Andy Warhol, for example, changed the imagery of everyday objects, as well as entertainment figures, through distorted shapes, sizes, and bold colors. As the decades passed, the style of "pop art" slightly changed as well. Later artists, such as Tom Wesselmann and Allen Jones presented their subject matter in a more shocking perspective. Women, and more specifically their bodies, were often the target of graphic manipulation. This sexual presentation was seen as pleasurable entertainment for male viewers, as much past artworks often did. This paper will attempt to ...
    Related: everyday life, popular art, vietnam war, jones, cans
  • Citizen Kane - 1,168 words
    Citizen Kane The classic masterpiece, Citizen Kane (1941), is probably the world's most famous and highly rated film, with its many remarkable scenes, cinematic and narrative techniques and innovations. The director, star, and producer were all the same individual - Orson Welles (in his film debut at age 25), who collaborated with Herman J. Mankiewicz on the script and with Gregg Toland as cinematographer. Within the maze of its own aesthetic, Citizen Kane develops two interesting themes. The first concerns the debasement of the private personality of the public figure, and the second deals with the crushing weight of materialism. Taken together, these two themes comprise the bitter irony of ...
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  • Colombian Art - 756 words
    Colombian Art Colombian Art It was not until the 1950s that Colombian artist showed their artwork to the nation and their skill behind it. Colombian artist began to rise like Alejandro Obregon, Enrique Grau, Edgar Negret and Eduardo Ramirez Villamizar- began to take new direction in the Colombian art world and also had a major influence on it too. The delay of Colombian art can be explained by the regions complex geography. Mountain barriers have said to separate the human settlement from others. Even after the independence from Spain in 1819, art didnt have a major influence on Colombian lifestyle. Then in the 1920s is when several outstanding sculptors, notably Marco Tobon Mejia and Jose H ...
    Related: colombian, ethnic background, van gogh, world war ii, painting
  • Composers Of 19th And 20th - 1,000 words
    ... will be the great Louis "Satchmo" Armstrong (1901 1971). Louis Daniel Armstrong was born in the Storyville District of New Orleans, Louisiana, on August 4, 1901, he always celebrated his birth as July 4, 1900 because that is what he was told and that is what he believed. His real date of birth was not known until after his death July 6, 1971. Mr. Armstrongs style of music was New Orleans Style Jazz. Some of his influences include his family, Peter Davis, and Joe "King" Oliver. Some notable history pertaining to Mr. Armstrong is that he came from a crime-ridden community. He was arrested at thirteen for firing a gun in the air at a New Years Celebration, and then was virtually saved by ...
    Related: king oliver, adolescent boys, west side, history, accidentally
  • Dada Vs Surrealism - 1,228 words
    Dada Vs. Surrealism What elements of dada and surrealism suggest the influence of Freud? The 20th Century marked a changed in how people viewed the known world. Since its beginning art has played a major role in how people were able to express themselves. The early 20th century brought rise to new and exciting art forms. These were types of writings, paintings and, documentaries that no one had ever seen before. From expressionism to Dadaism types of work ranged by all means of the artist. About the 1920's a new wave of art would soon be seen worlds over. This art form introduced psychology in a new way to look at the conscious and subconscious minds. From the beginning Dadaism and surrealis ...
    Related: dada, surrealism, andre breton, western culture, psyche
  • Death Of Salesman And Crucible - 5,122 words
    Death Of Salesman And Crucible Arthur Miller, winner of many literary and dramatic awards, is an incredibly influential force in American drama. His plays deal with issues common to every society. He makes the audience face fault, weakness, and ignorance; subjects we would typical hide from. At the same time he emphasizes strength, human spirit, and familial love. Alice Griffin believes that Miller's plays are important internationally (xii). He belongs to an international theater rather than a regional theater (Heilman 170). His plays are staged and studied by students to understand American life in Russia, P and, Iceland, Brazil, Italy, France, Germany, Czech Republic, and China to name a ...
    Related: crucible, death of a salesman, salesman, the crucible, make sense
  • Francis Bacon - 586 words
    Francis Bacon Francis Bacon (1909-92) Beginning on the early 1950s, despite the dominance of Abstract Expressionism in both the United States and Europe, there were recurring waves of insistence on a return to the figure, a new naturalism of naturalistic fantasy. Crucial to the new figuration were Alberto Giacometti and Jean Dubuffet. The only other figurative Expressionist powerful enough to be compared with Giacometti and Dubuffet were British. Chief among these was the Irish-born Francis Bacon, one of the artistic giants of his time. Bacon has been called the greatest poet of the second half of the 20th century and even those who deeply dislike his work find it memorable and horribly impr ...
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  • Francisco Jos Goya Y Lucientes - 1,216 words
    Francisco Jos Goya y Lucientes Born on March 30, 1746, in Aragon province of Spain. The reason for this mans two last names is that it is a Spanish custom to take on both parents last names to make a combination for their own, his fathers last name was Goya and his mothers, Lucientes, but he is most widely known by the name Goya. He lived in a very common family of the time, he worked as a gilder for a short while with his father in the town he was born in, Fuendetodos. But due to the economical needs of his family, Goya was sent to the fields and he suffered through long days of manual labor to make ends meet. In Goyas adolescence, his family moved to Zaragoza because his father wanted a be ...
    Related: francisco, goya, first great, great commission, lifelong
  • French New Wave - 1,238 words
    French New Wave The French New Wave was a movement that lasted between 1959 to 1964. It all started with the Cinematheque Francois, an underground organization that would regularly show older films from around the world. This beget the cine-club, and by the 1954 there were 100,000 members in 200 clubs. From these clubs several magazines were created, the most famous of these were LEcran Francois, La Revue du Cinema, Postif, and the world known Cahiers du Cinema. One of the two most influential people during this time was Alexandre Astruc who declared that, the cinema is becoming a means of expression like the other arts before it, especially painting and the novel. It is no longer a spectacl ...
    Related: wave, german expressionism, love story, francois truffaut, nazi
  • Gothic Sculpture - 395 words
    Gothic Sculpture In the Gothic period, remarkable sculpture was produced in France, Germany, and Italy. As in Romanesque times, much of it was made in conjunction with church architecture, although sculptured figures are also found on tombs, pulpits, and other church furnishings. France The great cathedral at Chartres exemplifies the stylistic evolution of the Gothic, which can be traced in viewing its portals. Its west entrance, the earliest, built in the mid-12th century, displays rigid, columnar figures with schematic drapery and similar, almost undifferentiated facial expressions; the later portals, on the north and south transepts, show greater differentiation of personality and costume ...
    Related: gothic, gothic period, sculpture, german expressionism, first women
  • Greek Art - 1,284 words
    Greek Art Over a period of time Greek art of the past has changed and evolved into what we value in todays society as true art and services as a blue print of our tomorrow. As we take a closer look at the Geometric Period and stroll up through the Hellenistic Period allow me to demonstrate the changes and point out how these transitions have servide the elements of time. During the geometric period the Greeks style of vase painting was know as Proto-geometric because it was preceded and anticipated the Geometric style - was characterized by linear motifs, such as spirals, diamonds, and crosshatching, rather than the stylized plants, birds, and sea creatures characteristic of minoan vase pain ...
    Related: greek, greek art, hellenistic period, changing world, realism
  • Guston - 606 words
    Guston Guston had three distinct phases or styles during his artistic career, all of them remarkably successful. After first working as a muralist in a relatively realistic style, he became prominent in the late 1940s and early 1950s as part of the abstract expressionism movement. Beginning in the late 1960s, his late period of clunky, expressive paintings of the human form marked the start of a revolt against the abstract style that had dominated American painting since the early 1950s. Born Philip Goldstein in Montreal, Canada, Guston moved with his Russian-Jewish emigr parents to Los Angeles, California in 1919. His father committed suicide in 1920. In 1927 Guston attended Manual Arts Hig ...
    Related: world war ii, klux klan, los angeles, pollock, artistic
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