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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: existential

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  • Yalom's Perspective Of Existential Therapy - 1,517 words
    Yalom'S Perspective Of Existential Therapy Existential therapy through the eyes of Dr. Yalom is very fascinating. There is never a fixed life that each person is supposed to live. In his therapy the clients are allowed to find out for themselves what it is they need by receiving adequate questioning from Dr. Yalom. His questioning guides them down the existential path to freedom and responsibility. "If we affirm life and live in the present as fully as possible, however, we will not be obsessed with the end of life"(Corey p.153). This is the way of thinking for the existential theorist when it comes to patients who deal with death anxiety. Dr. Yalom dealt with this issue when he did a study ...
    Related: existential, therapy, self esteem, research report, struggling
  • The Question Of Being: What It Is, Why It Matters - 1,317 words
    "The Question Of Being": What It Is, Why It Matters. Martin Heidegger attempts to answer the "question of Being" by appealing to the terminology and methodology of Dasein, most commonly defined as existence. Dasein is not simply any kind of existence, however, but an existence that is unique from all other existences in that it asks the question of existence while existing in the existence itself. In other words, one must first understand Dasein in order to understand Being because Dasein is a kind of being that is concerned about its very Being. Contrary to the popular opinion that in order to truly and clearly comprehend any phenomenon, the subject which interrogates must necessarily stand ...
    Related: thomas aquinas, martin heidegger, true meaning, reflective, disclosure
  • A Comparison Of Judaism, Islam, Christianity - 1,507 words
    A Comparison Of Judaism, Islam, & Christianity Religion is one of the driving forces behind many of the events and attitudes that have shaped our world. Throughout the centuries, laws have been enacted; cities and countries have been created and destroyed; and wars have been fought, all to promulgate or protect one religion or another. This paper will examine aspects of the three major Western religions of the world: Judaism, Islam, and Christianity. Topics covered will include the origin of all three religions, the view of God held by each tradition, and conflicts. Several of the beliefs of these religions will be examined, such as judgment, and the Trinity. Origin of Judaism The origins of ...
    Related: christianity, christianity and islam, christianity religion, comparison, great religions
  • A Comparison Of Macbeth And Crime And Punishment - 1,336 words
    A Comparison of Macbeth and Crime and Punishment Shakespeares Macbeth and Dostoevskys Crime and Punishment explore the psychological depths of man. These two works examine tragedy as represented through the existential beliefs of many philosophers. Existentialist theory expresses the idea that man can satisfy his own needs, regardless of social codes, if he has the energy and ambition to act. Both Macbeth and Raskolnikov have the ambition to act, but each struggles internally with their actions, frightened of the consequences. Although these works examine the tragedy and remorse of Macbeth and Raskolnikov, the idea of a driving force within each character remains evident. Ultimately, William ...
    Related: comparison, crime, crime and punishment, macbeth, punishment
  • Adlerian Psychotherapy: An Overview Of Theory And Practice - 1,190 words
    ... odify behavior. The goal of the therapy is to stimulate cognitive, affective and behavior change. Although the individual is not always fully aware of their specific goal, through analysis of birth order, repeated coping patterns and earliest memories, the psychotherapist infers the goal as a working hypothesis. The client approaches control of feelings and emotions. First, the client recognizes what kind of feeling he or she is having (angriness, sadness, frustration, etc). Once the client sees and knows the feeling; then he or she will try to imagine or think of something pleasant that had happened to him or her, replacing the bad feeling for a good one. By doing this, the client is in ...
    Related: overview, cognitive behavioral, behavior change, conflict resolution, adler
  • Alices Adventures In Wonderland - 1,690 words
    Alice's Adventures In Wonderland An analysis of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland The following text is a small part of a project from: Jerry Maatta, HII, Katedralskolan, Uppsala, Sweden Written in March 1997 Interpretations and opinions It is important to bear in mind that Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, however special it may seem and however many different interpretations one thinks one can find, is, after all, but a story written to entertain Charles Dodgson's favourite child-friends. It is very obvious in the story that it was written for the three Liddell girls, of whom Alice was the closest to Dodgson. In the introductory poem to the tale, there are clear indications to the three, th ...
    Related: wonderland, the girl, young girl, different forms, grief
  • Appleget 1 - 1,066 words
    Appleget 1 Joseph Appleget Mr. Helle/ IB English 12 10/18/00 The Way We Live Our Lives In our individual routines, each and every one of us strives to be the best that we are capable of being. How peculiar this is; we aim for similar goals, yet the methods we enact are unique. Just as no two people have the same fingerprint, no two have identical theories on how to live life. While some follow religious outlines to aspire to a level of oral excellence, others pursue different approaches. Toward the end of the Nineteenth-Century and on through the mid-Twentieth, a movement followed existentialism, a philosophical theory of life, in order to achieve such a level. Even though the idea of existe ...
    Related: nineteenth century, jean paul, ethical standards, insect, comprehend
  • Aristotle And Parmenides On Change - 1,076 words
    Aristotle And Parmenides On Change ARISTOTLE AND PARMENIDES ON CHANGE Looking at the arguments for change derived by Parmenides and Aristotle there are many differences, yet there are also some similarities. While Aristotle may disagree with much of Parmenides argument, he does agree with some of the strongest premises in the argument. In this paper I will present Aristotles rebuttal of Parmenides denial of change, as well as play the devils advocate for each of them in defending their views. At the beginning of Parmenides argument for change he asserts that not being is nothingness. Aristotle is in disagreement with this premise, because he believes that being has many meanings, and is not ...
    Related: aristotle, parmenides, make sense, interpretation, existential
  • Assisted Suicide - 1,648 words
    Assisted Suicide Assisted Suicide: Ethical or Immoral? Assisted Suicide, also known as mercy killing, occurs when a physician provides the means (drugs or other agents) by which a person can take his or her own life. This assistance is one of the most debated issues today in society followed by abortion. Physicians are frequently faced with the question of whether or not assisted suicide is ethical or immoral. Although assisted suicide is currently illegal in almost all states in America, it is still often committed. Is assisted suicide ethical? Studies have found that the majority of Americans support assisted suicide. One must weigh both sides of the argument before they can decide. On Jul ...
    Related: assisted suicide, physician assisted, physician assisted suicide, physician-assisted suicide, suicide
  • Benifits Of Technology - 1,517 words
    Benifits Of Technology Man, powered by his imagination and inquisitive character, has wondered he mechanisms of Nature since time infinite. This quest for the truth, the ways in which his surrounding works, has led to many a scientific discoveries and innovations. Since the art of making fire and creating handcrafted tools, our civilization has come a long way. Science and Technology are making advances at an amazing rate. From telephones to the Internet, calculators to computers, cars to rockets and satellites, we are submerged in a sea of discoveries and inventions made possible by Science. Fields like Medicine and communications have made inroads into our cultures and thus our lifestyles. ...
    Related: medical technology, science and technology, technology, second chance, genome project
  • Beyond The Problem Of Evil - 3,962 words
    ... is caught in his illusion of volition . . . [This illusion], his assumption that free will exists, is also part of the calculable mechanism ( 106). When a misfortune strikes, we can overcome it either by removing its cause or else by changing the effect it has on our feelings . . .( 108). There are elements in each of these texts--e.g., the denial of free will, the rejection of the idea retributive justice, and the recognition of possibility of overcoming our emotional reactions rather than our external environment--which resonate with the sympathetic reader of Spinoza. And while, in later years, Nietzsche loses some of his positivistic fervor, we shall see that significant similarities ...
    Related: good and evil, spoke zarathustra, heavenly father, c. s. lewis, attain
  • Burial Rights In India - 236 words
    Burial Rights In India Ellison gracefully weaves together several extended metaphors of invisibility, blindness, and enslavement throughout the novel. His training as a jazz musician surfaces in the intricate, nuanced developments of these metaphors. The rich symbolism of Invisible Man demonstrates Ellison's effort to never allow his reader to decide on one meaning for a particular symbol. Instead, he presents dozens of possible meanings, each one harmonizing with the rest. Multiple layers of meaning arise from almos t every portion of the novel. The careful, attentive reader is rewarded with complex themes that drive the development of the narrative on several levels. The narrative techniqu ...
    Related: burial, india, black experience, american culture, urban
  • Carl Gustav Jung - 1,811 words
    ... driving force to be a complete person! The self is the central archetype in the col lective unconscious, much as the sun us the center of the solar system. It unites the personality. When a person says he feels in harmony with himself and with the world, we can be sure that the self archetype is performing its work effectively. There are three ways how your psyche works together. One structure may compensate for the weakness of another structure, one component may oppose another component, and two or more structures may unite to form a synthesis. Compensation may be illustrated by the contrasting attitudes of extraversion and introversion. If extraversion is the dominant or superior att ...
    Related: carl, carl gustav jung, gustav, gustav jung, jung
  • Chen Ta Erh: The Time Bomb - 1,512 words
    Ch'en Ta Erh: The Time Bomb In Man's Fate, Andre Malraux examines the compelling forces that lead individuals to join a greater cause. Forced into a life of contempt, Ch'en portrays the man of action in the early phases of the Chinese Revolution. He dedicates himself to the communist cause. It is something greater than himself, a phenomenal concept that he has fused into. It is something for which he will give his life. How did this devotion come about? A combination of his personality, his interior life, as well as society's influence, molded him into a terrorist. Ch'en is self-destructive; he is controlled by his religion of terrorism and his fascination with death. He is representative of ...
    Related: bomb, chen, meaning of life, more important, priest
  • Crime And Punishment And Invisible Man - 1,117 words
    Crime And Punishment And Invisible Man Why Do I Exist? Existentialism in Crime and Punishment and Invisible Man The works of Dostoevsky and Ellison are both obvious existential novels, but they exist on two different levels of existentialism. In Invisible Man the invisible narrator has to deal with the enemy of a chaotic and prejudice world around him. In contrast Roskolnokov in Crime And Punishment is his own enemy, and struggles with his two separate identities. One which feels he is superior to ordinary men and the other which is kind, caring and sensitive to those around him. The movie, "Erin Brockovich" also deals with existentialism, and still on another level. She has to overcome a do ...
    Related: crime, crime and punishment, invisible, invisible man, punishment
  • Dante - 962 words
    Dante The journey of Dante through Hell, in both its structure and content, symbolizes the nature of sin and punishment. The structure of the book takes the reader step by step through greater and greater sins. The content of the book shows the different punishments for sins which are symbolic of the sins themselves; it also, through its language, shows how Hell compares to life. This book was written for Christians and deals heavily with religion, but can be interpreted and learned from in an existential manner In the Inferno, Hell is divided into nine circles. Dante progresses through each of these circles in order. Each circle represents a greater sin and, therefore, a greater punishment. ...
    Related: dante, good life, round, choosing
  • Dietrich Bonhoeffers Interpretation Of Ot - 1,691 words
    ... e Bonhoeffers sermon on Psalm 58 (July 11, 1937) grapples with the difficulty in understanding the biblical soundness of the desiring of vengeance. Should Christians be permitted to utilize this form of prayer? Is it biblical (Kuske 85)? The person praying this prayer must be sinless. David is permitted to pray such a prayer because Christ, the sinless one, was (as mentioned in the study of King David) in him. Because Christ is sinless, he has the right to condemn injustice. In this Psalm, Christ calls for the annihilation of evil and later enacts this in his death and resurrection. David stands in the shadow of Christ, bearing witness to him (Harrelson 129). Bonhoeffer finds a way to pr ...
    Related: dietrich, interpretation, revised edition, modern world, cambridge
  • Egoism - 1,986 words
    Egoism Egoism Psychological egoism is a reflex that every person has to orient themselves toward their own welfare. Through this, it follows that every one of his (or her) voluntary actions is some good to himself. If someone gives away the last piece of bread to someone else, it is because they want to look like a better person. Due to the fact that they would give away the last piece of bread. Human nature is completely and exclusively egoistic. People are entirely selfish and devoid of any genuine feelings of sympathy, benevolence, or sociability. They are always thinking of themselves in everything they do. Each individual is preoccupied exclusively with the gratification of personal des ...
    Related: egoism, happy life, bear arms, right to bear arms, fund
  • End Of The Road - 499 words
    End Of The Road John Barth manifests the pessimism of existential philosophy by allegorizing God, Satan, and the soul of Man, through the use of Joseph, Jacob, and Rennie, respectively. This conceit reveals not only because of the constant emphatic repetition of the words "God and lord" when referring to Joe, and "hell, and damned" when referring to Jake, but it can also be viewed in terms of the situations that Rennie struggles in between these two beings. According to Rennie, "Joe is God." Like God, Joe punishes harshly when crucial mistakes are made, but then forgives. For example his socking of Rennie when she apologized to him displays that overwhelming intolerance that God is known for ...
    Related: existential philosophy, good and evil, vice versa, pessimism, personality
  • Existentialism - 1,135 words
    Existentialism Existentialism is a philosophical movement that developed during the 19th and 20th centuries. One of the first things one may notice about existentialism is the confusion and disagreement of what it actually is. Dissertations have been written on the expanse of the topic, but I shall only give an overview of the philosophy. Walter Kaufmann, one of the leading existential scholars says, Certainly, existentialism is not a school of thought nor reducible to any set of tenets. The three writers who appear invariably on every list of existentialists, Heidegger, and Sartre -- are not in agreement on essentials. By the time we consider adding Rilke, Kafka, and Camus, it becomes plain ...
    Related: existentialism, paul sartre, make sense, samuel beckett, camus
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