Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: american identity

  • 20 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • American Identity - 1,828 words
    American Identity The American Identity It can strongly be argued, as it has for many years, whether or not an American identity ever occurred between 1776 and 1861. The answer to this question really depends on your definition of what an identity consists of. An identity is the sameness in all that constitutes the objective reality of a thing; oneness. The thirteen colonies tried hard to find a sense of themselves as a nation even before they had a nation. Nationality became an American invention (notes). To find an identity the thirteen colonies created a flag, symbols of nationality (bald eagle, pluribus Unum), and they established national heroes (George Washington). Next they began to s ...
    Related: american, american identity, national identity, huckleberry finn, missouri compromise
  • Aaron Douglas - 1,128 words
    Aaron Douglas People may ask, what other than a tornado can come out of Kansas? Well, Aaron Douglas was born of May 26, 1899 in Topeka, Kansas. Aaron Douglas was a "Pioneering Africanist" artist who led the way in using African- oriented imagery in visual art during the Harlem Renaissance of 1919- 1929. His work has been credited as the catalyst for the genre incorporating themes in form and style that affirm the validity of the black consciousness and experience in America. His parents were Aaron and Elizabeth Douglas. In 1922, he graduated from the University of Nebraska School of Fine Arts in Lincoln. Who thought that this man would rise to meet W.E.B. Du Bois's 1921 challenge, calling fo ...
    Related: aaron, douglas, negro history, american experience, breath
  • Daisy Miller - 849 words
    Daisy Miller Upon Winterbournes return to Vevey, Switzerland, he had been resting on a park bench, conversing with a curious little boy when a beautiful young lady, Daisy Miller, approached. After a brief prattle, the two arranged a days trip to the Castle of Chillon and over the next few months planned on meeting again in Italy. Throughout the story, Winterbourne tries to descry Miss Millers personality and at the same time question her reputation as a flirtatious American girl in the late nineteenth century. Henry James famous novelette, Daisy Miller, is a timeless story depicting what results from the defiance of social customs, ignoring advice pertaining to ones reputation, and finally c ...
    Related: daisy, daisy miller, miller, dear friend, european society
  • Differring Religions - 1,226 words
    Differring Religions Each religious group possesses its own individual world- view. Two groups, which vary a great deal when reflecting upon their world-views are the Native Americans and the Puritans. While one group holds one set of standards and beliefs to be true, the other group abides by a completely opposite set of ideas. The Native American religion functions using its own world view. Unlike in Western religions, the Native American religion does not have certain places in which they need to be more religious than others do. In the Native American religion there is no notion of essential monotheism. There is no one true god in their religion; therefore they are free to have open-ende ...
    Related: american religion, religion and politics, religion and society, good people, human life
  • Experiencing Immigration - 1,492 words
    Experiencing Immigration The United States has been notorious for welcoming peoples from all over the world onto its lands in order to facilitate the growth of a diverse nation and generations of families have traveled to America in search of creating lives more fulfilling than those they had escaped. During the years of the late 1800s and early 1900s, the United States allowed the highest rates of immigration in it's history with groups from a number of different countries sought an escape from the economical, political, and religious hardships their own nations bequeathed. This massive influx of such a myriad of ethnicities irreversibly changed the evolution of the newly formed United Stat ...
    Related: experiencing, immigration, different countries, religious persecution, lecture
  • Experiencing Immigration - 1,478 words
    ... ed to practice Jewish religion, many cities erected synagogues and other houses of worship. On New York's East Side alone, 500 Jewish houses of worship were built between 1880 and 1915. (American Identity Explorer, CD-ROM) The Educational Alliance was formed to aid in the transition by offering citizenship classes to adults, cooking and sewing classes, and facilities for young Jewish children. Its aim was to "Americanize and modernize the newcomers and aid in their adjustment. (American Identity Explorer, CD-ROM) Other groups similar to the Alliance included the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (H.I.A.S), The Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society, and the Hebrew Free Loan Society. (American Ide ...
    Related: experiencing, immigration, living conditions, east european, wages
  • George Washington - 935 words
    George Washington George Washington's memory is held in honor by his fellow countrymen and by the world. The enemies and critics who attacked him in war and in peace are now largely forgotten, but his name has become a byword for honor, loyalty, and love of country. He was known as the "father of his country". Washington was a "father" in several ways. He was commander in chief of the American forces in the American Revolution, chairman of the convention that wrote the United States Constitution, and the first president of the United States. He led the men who turned America from an English colony into a self-governing nation. Also, he set the standard for future presidents and for the whole ...
    Related: george washington, ohio river, leadership qualities, important role, supportive
  • Irvings American Progeny - 1,410 words
    Irving's American Progeny Irving's American Progeny Washington Irving had the unique opportunity of helping a new nation forge its own identity. America, fresh out of the revolution, looked for an author to take charge and create something that seemed to be missing from the newly born nation. He took this responsibility seriously and made a mythology that founded an American literary tradition. He took bits and pieces from the Old World and incorporated them into the New in such a manner that what he wrote appeared original, and yet tied into a tradition that was centuries old. He did this in a manner that astonished many Europeans who believed an American could never produce literature with ...
    Related: american, american culture, american folklore, american history, american identity, american literary, american revolution
  • Irvings American Progeny - 1,375 words
    ... cause whoever wins her also wins the treasures of her father. Crane recognized this fact as well as Brom Van Brunt, the story's symbol of the American people. Crane wished to take Katrina, as well as their children and possessions, and travel to new territory, away from Sleepy Hollow, where she was born and raised, much as England had taken America's resources away from her people in order to replenish depleted funds. Van Brunt recognized Crane's self-interest and therefore fought to keep the treasure where it rightfully belonged. Ichabod's destructive tendencies were shown through Irving's description of him riding to the party. "He rode with short stirrups, which brought his knees near ...
    Related: american, american fiction, american identity, american landscape, american literary, american literature, american people
  • Poles And Italians In Detroit - 1,636 words
    Poles And Italians In Detroit Poles and Italians in Detroit In the late 17th century and early 18th century Detroit was a hotbed for foreign immigration. The booming automobile industry and resulting growth of the city ensured that many jobs were available for those able to take them. Among these immigrants were distinct groups originating from many different countries. Two of these groups were the Poles and the Italians, who arrive to Detroit looking for a new beginning. Although many similarities can be found between the groups there are an equal number of differences, which defined each separate culture. In this paper Id like to focus on the similarities and differences between the Poles ...
    Related: detroit, italian culture, world war i, world economy, isnt
  • Rebel Poets Of 1950s - 1,826 words
    Rebel Poets Of 1950S Rebel Poets of the 1950s America demands a poetry that is bold, modern and all-surrounding and kosmical, as she is herself. Although Walt Whitman wrote that prescription shortly after the Civil War, it also vividly describes the generation of American poets who came of age after World War II. Particularly during moments of cultural change, poets have joined artists on the front lines of expanding consciousness by forging a vernacular language that gives expression to contemporary life. One such shift in poetry occurred at the time of World War I, and another major shift took place during the decade after the Second World War. The 1950s are stereotypically represented as ...
    Related: american poets, poets, rebel, urban life, natural environment
  • Southern Strategy - 1,156 words
    Southern Strategy The causes and consequences of the Southern Strategy as it relates to African-Americans and the American political system. Richard Nixon's Southern Strategy (or as the Nixon administration would call it positive polarization) of the 1960s was a political platform that provided the final push in transforming the the party of Lincoln into the political party greatly favored by the great grandsons of the old Confederacy. This strategy was aimed at getting support from the traditionally Democratic South by promising not to promote sweeping social or economic changes in race relations. Nixon argued that he supported equality however, he was against big government. Meaning, he wa ...
    Related: strategy, booker t washington, american community, middle class, integration
  • Southern Strategy - 1,153 words
    Southern Strategy The causes and consequences of the "Southern Strategy" as it relates to African-Americans and the American political system. Richard Nixon's "Southern Strategy" (or as the Nixon administration would call it "positive polarization") of the 1960s was a political platform that provided the final push in transforming the "the party of Lincoln" into the political party greatly favored by the great grandsons of the old Confederacy. This strategy was aimed at getting support from the traditionally Democratic South by promising not to promote sweeping social or economic changes in race relations. Nixon argued that he supported equality however, he was against "big government". Mean ...
    Related: strategy, party system, social science research, booker t washington, rhetoric
  • Symbolism In Young Goodman Brown - 1,739 words
    Symbolism In Young Goodman Brown Nathaniel Hawthorne's work is typically fraught with symbolism, much of it deriving from his Puritan ancestry; a great-great uncle was actually a judge in the Salem witchcraft trials (Roth 76). Not surprisingly, Hawthorne was obsessed with the twin themes of sin and guilt. Author John Roth notes that A number of recurring thematic patterns and character types appear in Hawthorne's novels and tales. These repetitions show Hawthorne's emphasis on the effects of events on the human heart rather than the events themselves (76). Because he is speaking of what we later would come to call the unconscious, Hawthorne extensively employed the use of symbolism, which by ...
    Related: brown, goodman, goodman brown, symbolism, young goodman, young goodman brown
  • The Harlem Renaissance - 1,150 words
    The Harlem Renaissance Or the New Negro Movement The dawn of the 1920s ushered in an African American artistic and cultural movement, the likes of which have never and will likely never be seen again. Beginning as a series of literary discussions in Greenwich Village and Harlem, the "New Negro Movement" (later dubbed the Harlem Renaissance by Alain Locke) came to exalt the unique culture of African Americans and redefine African American expression. The movement spread throughout all areas of the arts and humanities, gaining a wider audience as it went along. Soon it became more than just an artistic movement, it was at the same time a social ideal. The authors and artists of the era simulta ...
    Related: harlem, harlem renaissance, renaissance, american identity, neale hurston
  • The Name Of War - 1,294 words
    The Name Of War In this historical and culturally divided book, Jill Lepore examines and tries to define the King Philips War and how people wrote about it. At the beginning of the colonies it was a start of a New England and after the King Philips War with all of the religious conflicts and war stories, a new American identity was born. Throughout this book she tells gruesome tales about murders, massacres, and battles. Even thought his book jumps a lot in chronically order she successfully tells the tales for both sides pretty accurately. I enjoyed reading some parts of this book. Especially the beginning and the middle because I thought the End dropped off and slowed down. Starting even b ...
    Related: american culture, new england, divine right, tale, jill
  • The Power Of The Declaration - 1,219 words
    The Power Of The Declaration Power and The Declaration of Independence There are many abstractions in the Declaration of Independence. These abstractions such as: rights, freedom, liberty and happiness have become the foundations of American society and have helped to shape the American Identity. Power, another abstraction that reoccurs in all the major parts of the Declaration of Independence plays an equally important role in shaping American Identity. One forgets the abstraction of power, because it appears in relation to other institutions: the legislature, the King, the earth, and the military. The abstraction of power sets the tone of the Declaration, and shapes the colonists conceptio ...
    Related: declaration, declaration of independence, english dictionary, social institutions, adopt
  • Washington Irving - 1,584 words
    Washington Irving Irving, Washington (1783-1859), American writer, the first American author to achieve international renown, who created the fictional characters Rip Van Winkle and Ichabod Crane. The critical acceptance and enduring popularity of Irving's tales involving these characters proved the effectiveness of the as an American literary form. Born in New York City, Irving studied law at private schools. After serving in several law offices and traveling in Europe for his health from 1804 to 1806, he was eventually admitted to the bar in 1806. His interest in the law was neither deep nor long-lasting, however, and Irving began to contribute satirical essays and sketches to New York new ...
    Related: irving, washington irving, literary movement, york state, encyclopedia
  • Washington Irving - 1,543 words
    ... he ten years between 1809 and 1819. Supported by his family and lionized by society for his early successes, Irving lived up to his reputation as a genial man of leisure. The second phase of Washington Irving's search for identity commenced when he set sail in May of 1815 for Europe. He was not to return for 17 years. His brother Peter falling ill, Irving stepped in to help run the import business. When the War of 1812 ended in 1815, low demand in the U.S. for trade goods from England caused the business to fail. Finally, in 1818, the brothers declared bankruptcy. Irving was devastated, becoming severely anxious about earning a livelihood. For the first time, he set out to write a commer ...
    Related: general washington, george washington, irving, washington irving, george iii
  • What Is An American - 973 words
    What Is An American What Does "American Mean?" Webster's Dictionary defines American as or its inhabitants. But is that all America and an American truly is? Is a person American simply because of geography? According to Identities, "America is a confluence of cultures." Americans are people whose lives depict men and women who are trying to be as successful and robust as possible, this quest is symbolic to citizens of many other countries. This is why America illustrates the Statue of Liberty, a structure that symbolizes freedom throughout the world. America is composed not only of these peoples, but the cultures and the ways of life of these people. The Statue of Liberty symbolizes a fearl ...
    Related: american, american identity, american lives, american mind, political issues
  • 20 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1