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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: ethnic identity

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  • A Journey Though The Golden Gates Of Promise - 2,284 words
    ... because, without them, the United States would become overpopulated and it would slowly deteriorate. If Congress did not create the quota laws as a way to control who is allowed to enter the country, it would leave the magnificent "Golden Gates" open to anyone who wanted to enter the promise land. It is insane to even consider letting everyone of every ethnicity into the United States because the results would be devastating for the American society. American citizens often criticize that the quota laws discriminate towards different ethnic groups, but, in reality, it is common sense to prefer letting immigrants into the country that are more likely to "fit in" with the cultures being p ...
    Related: golden, promise, another country, labor laws, reject
  • China History - 1,343 words
    China History Prior to the 1800's, and before foreign influence, China was a powerful country, and had been ruled by many different dynasties starting with the Hsia dynasty in the second millenium B.C. to the Ching dynasty ending in 1911. (A Short History of China, pp. 12, 166.) Although dynasties had changed and several dynasties had been foreign, the Manchus (Ching dynasty) were the last foreign people to rule over China. The Manchus kept their own language and ethnic identity but maintained political order and military organization and thus insinuated themselves into China and gained the cooperation of the elite, the traditional educated gentry, who were the leading families in the commun ...
    Related: century history, china, history, imperial china, short history
  • Ethnic Conflict In The Middle East - 1,932 words
    Ethnic Conflict In The Middle East Ethnic Conflict in the Middle East Ethnic conflicts are well rooted in the world's history and perhaps inherent in human nature. This type of conflict is difficult to resolve as is evident in the situation in the Middle East. The ethnic conflict theory explains that it is not territory, politics, or economics that prevents the achievement of peace between the Israeli and Palestinian peoples, instead, it is a deep-seated hatred of one another that neither group can overcome. The Camp David Summit in July 2000, the most recent attempt at fostering a lasting peace is a clear example of how ethnocentrism can prevents success. Contrasting with neo-realism, which ...
    Related: conflict resolution, conflict theory, east jerusalem, ethnic, ethnic conflict, ethnic groups, ethnic identity
  • Frederick James The Limites Of Post Modern Theory - 2,451 words
    ... ime: Space does not seem to require a temporal expression; if it is not what absolutely does without such temporal figurality, then at the very least it might be said that space is what represses temporality and temporal figurality absolutely, to the benefit of other figures and codes. (ST, 21) What I want to come back to in a moment is the all or nothing rhetoric of Jameson's notion of postmodern space, the initial qualification that space cannot completely annihilate temporality is immediately undercut by the assertion that, on a representational level, it is precisely spaces ability to absolutely repress temporality that is the issue. I have not time to develop this here but what I wo ...
    Related: frederick, post modern, social theory, global capitalism, global market
  • Genocide In Rwanda - 725 words
    Genocide in Rwanda The definition of genocide as given in the Websters College Dictionary is "The deliberate and systematic extermination of a national, racial, political, or cultural group." This definition depicts the situation in 1994 of Rwanda, a small, poor, central African country. The Rwandan genocide was the systematic extermination of over eight hundred thousand Tutsi, an ethnic group in Rwanda, by the Hutu, another ethnic group in Rwanda. In this essay I will briefly describe the history of the conflict of the Hutu and Tutsi, the 100 days of genocide in 1994, and the affects of the massacre on the economy and the people of Rwanda. To fully understand why this slaughter occurred, we ...
    Related: genocide, rwanda, united nations, health care, intervene
  • In What Ways Is Identity A Social Construct - 1,642 words
    In What Ways Is Identity A Social Construct? "Without social identity, there is, in fact, no society." -- Richard Jenkins The idea that beliefs about "who we are" are created in a social context reflects the basic sociological theory that human beings are socially created, not prisoners of instinct. Sociologists see identity as related to the society in which people exist. People, are, in part, socialized into their identities. There are assorted ways that conceptions about individual and group identities are socially constructed. An identity is created against a social background that tries to make social interaction meaningful, understandable and well-organized by categorizing people in va ...
    Related: construct, ethnic identity, gender identity, sexual identity, social class, social construction, social factors
  • Kosovo - 1,199 words
    Kosovo Kosovo U.S. Involvement in Kosovo War has been waged in the Balkans for thousands of years. Yugoslavia has been divided, reunited, divided again, undergone wars and been through depressions. Each country within the Yugoslavia region has experienced hardships due to a failing economy, poor leadership, and civil wars. In the past few years, a major upheaval in the political structure and the disputes concerning land between the different religions and ethnicity's has caused a civil war. The country and ethnic group of this recent dispute is Serbia and Kosovo. The Albanian Kosovars want their independence from Serbia, while the Serbs consider Kosovo the location in which their cultural a ...
    Related: kosovo, kosovo liberation army, national identity, ottoman empire, russia
  • Premodern To Post Modern Society - 1,778 words
    ... d the religious persuasion of the ruling party be brought to bear against nonbelievers. The church's diminishing power let new ideas flourish that would have been thought heresy before. Science was no longer held back by the doctrines of organized religion. One hallmark of the modern age is rapid technological change. Science, free of religious scrutiny, made leaps and bounds. Science was applied to everyday life to save time and energy. All sectors of industry mechanized to increase output. Medicine made huge advances, drastically cutting the infant death rate. Medical advances were responsible for extending the average lifetime. Now there were more people surviving to adulthood and liv ...
    Related: modern period, modern society, modern world, post modern, twentieth century
  • The Kurds A Nation Without A State - 1,870 words
    The Kurds - A Nation Without a State Introduction Of all the ethnic groups in the world, the Kurds are one of the largest that has no state to call their own. According to historian William Westermann, "The Kurds can present a better claim to race purity...than any people which now inhabits Europe." (Bonner, p. 63, 1992) Over the past hundred years, the desire for an independent Kurdish state has created conflicts mainly with the Turkish and Iraqi populations in the areas where most of the Kurds live. This conflict has important geographical implications as well. The history of the Kurdish nation, the causes for these conflicts, and an analysis of the situation will be discussed in this pape ...
    Related: current state, kurds, free elections, middle east, odds
  • To Kill A Mocking Bird By Lee - 833 words
    To Kill A Mocking Bird By Lee Racial categories are created in the film To Kill A Mockingbird through a complex societal hierarchy founded in difference. Although all of Macon county lives in poverty, the town does not unite on the basis of this shared experience, but instead focuses on their differences, both real and imagined, to segregate themselves. The town operates under a general assumption that wealthier whites hold the most power and prestige, followed by poorer whites, while all blacks, regardless of financial station, are considered to be the lowest citizens. General depictions of black men and women in the film are of household servants and ignorant, docile farm workers. The only ...
    Related: bird, mocking, to kill a mockingbird, basic elements, enforcement officers
  • Tremont, Ohio - 1,724 words
    Tremont, Ohio A history of Tremont symbolizes the typical urban American neighborhood with its mish-mash of cultures. It offers eclectic sites and adaptive locations for filmmaking. I will look at the history of Tremont as a cultural center of the Midwest before the filming of The Deer Hunter (Figure 3). In addition, I will examine the history of Saint Theodosius Russian Orthodox Cathedral and the history of Lemko Hall to illustrate the eclecticism and adaptability that director, Michael Cimino, tapped in his film. Director Michael Cimino's most powerful, and controversial film work The Deer Hunter examines the uniqueness of this area by focusing its setting on Saint Theodosius Russian Ortho ...
    Related: ohio, world war 1, san francisco, savior jesus christ, deer
  • Urbanization - 1,335 words
    ... al Benefit Society was one answer to this problem for the ethnic Jews of Toronto. The establishment served to facilitate Jewish immigrants with difficult times following their arrival, and to assist them in transporting other family members to the city from the old country (Harney, 1985). Thus at the level of the individual, ethnic networks and resources are the structural links between destination and origin which mediate the migrant's integration into a new society (Locher, 1979). They contribute to the creation of an ethnic neighbourhood where immigrants of the same cultural background assist one another with incorporation in the new society. Though the integration may be slow or tedi ...
    Related: urbanization, east asia, ethnic groups, factors contributing, winnipeg
  • Vietnam - 4,224 words
    Vietnam INTRODUCTION The war-torn country of Vietnam is once again in the midst of a revolution. Only this war is not being fought with soldiers and tanks; rather, it is being fought and won with businessmen and free-trade. This new on-slot of foreign business in the formerly closed country have completely rejuvenated the Vietnamese economy. For the first time since the re-unification of Vietnam in 1976, the doors of the market place are opened to the outside world and Vietnam is aggressively taking a stance for further economic development. Before any International firm attempts to conduct business with, or in Vietnam, it is extremely important to not only know your potential consumer, but ...
    Related: north vietnam, south vietnam, southern vietnam, vietnam, economic system
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