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  • The Arts Of Russia - 854 words
    The Arts Of Russia Russian Art, Music and Literature The Arts play a large role in the expression of inner thoughts and beauty in life. From dance and music to art the concept of life is shown through the various ways in which we interpret it. The arts play a valued role in creating cultures and developing and documenting civilizations. Russia has been developing the its culture for as long as anybody could think. Nowadays, Russian painters and musicians are quickly becoming well known among each and every one around the world. It should be no surprise that the rich Russian culture is producing so much talent, and everyone around the world seems to enjoy it. Great artists such as Peter Ilich ...
    Related: arts, modern art, russia, stained glass, opera house
  • Theodor Herzl And Zionism - 710 words
    Theodor Herzl And Zionism One of the most important influences in the movement that led to the creation of the state of Israel was Jewish writer and journalist Theodor Herzl. He was born on May 2, 1860 in Budapest, Hungary. Herzl studied law in Vienna, but later on went into a literary career. This proved a good decision, as he became a well-known playwright and essayist and in 1891, Hertzl was appointed Paris correspondent for the Vienna Neue Freie Presse (New Free Press). During the Alfred Dreyfus affair in 1894, anti-Semitic feelings in France spread greatly. This greatly affected Hertzl because before that he believed that the best solution of anti-Semitism in Europe was the assimilation ...
    Related: zionism, european jews, best solution, jordan river, founded
  • Thomas Paine - 946 words
    Thomas Paine Thomas Paine came as a English man who didn't have much of anything, not many friends, not much money, but with the help of others wishing to keep him alive and give him a chance at a new life. Thomas Paine grew from a sick, unshaven, almost penniless, dirty man to a clean shaven man who helped band thousands of Englishmen together to fight for Independence. Thomas Paine was born in England on January 29, 1737. Paine travelled to American 1774, He landed, then went to Pennsylvania. When he landed he started teaching two children with the recommendation of Benjamin Franklin. After he got a job as a journalist and essayist and helped a Scotsman named Robert Aitkin start a magazine ...
    Related: paine, thomas jefferson, thomas paine, harcourt brace, benjamin franklin
  • Transcendentalism - 745 words
    Transcendentalism During the late 1800s and early 1900s, a new era was developing in American society. The United States was an idealistic nation with separate beliefs and lifestyles. One of the most intriguing lifestyles introduced during this time was transcendentalism. Many authors, such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathanial Hawthorne, Walt Whitman and Henry David Thoreau, developed this idea and tried to make people understand the meaning behind this new way of lfe. Through his extensive writings of books, essays and poetry, Thoreau gave the American public a deep insight to the new world of transcendentalism. While he was growing up, Thoreau rarely left his birth town of Concord. He felt th ...
    Related: transcendentalism, civil disobedience, ralph waldo emerson, american renaissance, fuller
  • Transcendentalist Movement - 869 words
    Transcendentalist Movement Transcendentalism was a literary movement in the first half of the 19th century. The philosophical theory contained such aspects as self-examination, the celebration of individualism, and the belief that the fundamental truths existed outside of human experience. Fulfillment of this search for knowledge came when one gained an acute awareness of beauty and truth, and communicated with nature to find union with the Over-Soul. When this occurred, one was cleansed of materialistic aims, and was left with a sense of self-reliance and purity. Two authors who were among the leaders of the movement were Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, whose works "Nature", "S ...
    Related: literary movement, henry david thoreau, first half, human experience, reliance
  • Upton Sinclair - 808 words
    Upton Sinclair READ ALL ABOUT IT... UPTON SINCLAIR!! My cause is the Cause of a man who has never yet been defeated, and whose whole being is one all devouring, God-given holy purpose, declared Upton Beall Sinclair. This man is not only an American novelist, essayist, journalist, but also deeply involved in politics. He has accomplished so many things throughout his life span, it is tough to compare him to anyone else. Until Sinclair was in his later life, he was an unknown failure to many, but then for forty years after that, he was Americas most important writer. Sinclair was born in Baltimore on the 20th of September in 1878. He was born in near poverty conditions to his dysfunctional fam ...
    Related: sinclair, upton, upton sinclair, dysfunctional family, free speech
  • Washington Irving - 1,584 words
    Washington Irving Irving, Washington (1783-1859), American writer, the first American author to achieve international renown, who created the fictional characters Rip Van Winkle and Ichabod Crane. The critical acceptance and enduring popularity of Irving's tales involving these characters proved the effectiveness of the as an American literary form. Born in New York City, Irving studied law at private schools. After serving in several law offices and traveling in Europe for his health from 1804 to 1806, he was eventually admitted to the bar in 1806. His interest in the law was neither deep nor long-lasting, however, and Irving began to contribute satirical essays and sketches to New York new ...
    Related: irving, washington irving, literary movement, york state, encyclopedia
  • Working As American Necessity - 385 words
    Working As American Necessity During the birth of this country, Puritans had to work hard to ensure the success of the new state. In order to make work more appealing, the Puritans emphasized the fruits of labor. This attitude, reflected in modern day by the act of "working for a living," is considered as a "badge of pride." Puritan attitudes toward work and the attitudes of two modern day writers toward work all agree that the act of working has virtuous effects, an attitude that I share because of my working experience (Clee and Clee 233-234). Three different attitudes toward work, expressed by several writers whom I have recently studied agree that hard work yields positive rewards. Henry ...
    Related: american, necessity, english teacher, marge piercy, sinful
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