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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: essayist

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  • Essayist Art - 864 words
    Essayist Art Sounds Personification "Commerce is unexpectedly confident and serene, alert, adventurous and unwearied." (84) Through the personification of commerce Thoreau is able to show that commerce fluctuates in the same manner as humanity. The adjectives he uses to describe commerce show that commerce has some of the same tendencies as humans, and Thoreau believes that it is these tendencies that make commerce so successful. Chapter 5: Solitude Allusion "who keeps himself more secret than ever did Goffe or Whalley." (96) Thoreau is making a historical allusion to William Goffe and Edward Whalley who were English regicides during the English civil war. They were signers of the death warr ...
    Related: essayist, charles i, mind and body, more important, suggestion
  • In His Many Careers As A Printer, Moralist, Essayist, Civic Leader, Scientist, Inventor, Statesman, Diplomat, And Philosopher - 420 words
    In his many careers as a printer, moralist, essayist, civic leader, scientist, inventor, statesman, diplomat, and philosopher, Benjamin Franklin Became both a spokesman and a model for the national character of later generations of Americans. After less than two years of formal schooling, Franklin was pressed into his father's trade. At the age of 16, Franklin wrote some pieces in a courant, "Silence Dogwood." Though penniless and unknown, Franklin soon found a job as a printer. After a year he went to England, where he became a master printer, sowed some wild oats, astonished Londoners with his swimming feats, and lived among the famous writers of London. In 17227, Franklin began his career ...
    Related: careers, civic, philosopher, wild oats, benjamin franklin
  • And Media Effect - 1,372 words
    Tv And Media Effect Television is a vital source from which most Americans receive information. News and media delegates on television have abused theirs powers over society through the airing of appealing news shows that misinform the public. Through literary research and experimentation, it has been proven that people's perception of reality has been altered by the information they receive from such programs. Manipulation, misinterpretation, word arrangement, picture placement and timing are all factors and tricks that play a major role in the case. Research, experimentation, and actual media coverage has pinpointed actual methods used for deceptive advertising. Television influences socie ...
    Related: media, media coverage, media studies, news & media, news program
  • Ask Most Americans Who Jeanpaul Sartre Is And You Will Most Likely Get A Frowned Look According To Journalist, Richard Eyre, - 750 words
    Ask most Americans who Jean-Paul Sartre is and you will most likely get a frowned look. According to journalist, Richard Eyre, in this country, Sartre is perhaps as unfashionable as loon pants. That is in part because Sartre, albeit a great French philosopher, didnt have a poster status. Sartre was not a particularly attractive man and although he was the darling of the 60s in all of Europe, his pipe, glasses and an air of bad temper kept him off walls that celebrated the Brigitte Bardots and the James Deans. Furthermore, Sartre was not always an easy man to understand. His writings are not particularly fanciful and he doesnt necessarily care to engage the reader by painting pretty pictures ...
    Related: jean paul sartre, jean-paul sartre, paul sartre, sartre, no exit
  • Ben Franklin - 1,679 words
    Ben Franklin Ben Franklin was the definition of the self-made man. He began his career as a simple apprentice for a printer (his brother) following leaving school at the age of 10, but he and his writings went far beyond the shop where he first started. He spent the early years of his life as a printer, moralist, essayist, scientist, inventor, and a philosopher. He later went on to become a civic leader, statesman, and diplomat. Upon man of those careers he was a strong force in developing the new nation of America. His political views showed him to be a man who loved freedom and self-government. His common sense, his whit, and his ability to negotiate behind the scenes lent a hand in the fo ...
    Related: benjamin franklin, franklin, british empire, university press, presidency
  • Claude Mckays If We Must Die - 1,237 words
    Claude Mckay`S If We Must Die Poetry - Claude McKay "If We Must Die" One of the most influential writers of the Harlem Renaissance was Jamaican born Claude McKay, who was a political activist, a novelist, an essayist and a poet. Claude McKay was aware of how to keep his name consistently in mainstream culture by writing for that audience. Although in McKay's arsenal he possessed powerful poems. The book that included such revolutionary poetry is Harlem Shadows. His 1922 book of poems, Harlem Shadows, Barros acknowledged that this poem was said by many to have inaugurated the Harlem Renaissance. Throughout McKay's writing career he used a lot of dialect and African American vernacular in his ...
    Related: claude, claude mckay, winston churchill, human life, winston
  • David Herbert - 902 words
    David Herbert Lawrence As a twentieth century novelist, essayist, and poet, David Herbert Lawrence brought the subjects of sex, psychology, and religion to the forefront of literature. One of the most widely read novels of the twentieth century, Sons and Lovers, which Lawrence wrote in 1913, produces a sense of Bildungsroman1, where the novelist re-creates his own personal experiences through the protagonist in (Niven 115). Lawrence uses Paul Morel, the protagonist in Sons and Lovers, for this form of fiction. With his mother of critical importance, Lawrence uses Freuds Oedipus complex, creating many analyses for critics. Alfred Booth Kuttner states the Oedipus complex as: "the struggle of a ...
    Related: david, herbert, twentieth century, oedipus complex, maternal
  • Diversity In The Workplace - 1,433 words
    Diversity In The Workplace DIVERSITY IN WORKPLACE ABSTRACT: As companies are becoming more and more diverse its becoming more and more important for companies to understand and manage it. The people of different background, races, religion creates diverse workforce. There is an importance of having diverse workforce to provide better performance. There are perspectives of managing the diverse workforce, which require organization leaders and managers of being responsible of attaining better diverse workforce. INTRODUCTION Diversity means differences, difference of age, sex, race, religion and culture etc. People with different demographic differences working in the organization makes diverse ...
    Related: cultural diversity, diversity, diversity in the workplace, diversity management, managing diversity, workplace
  • Emily Dickinson - 1,611 words
    Emily Dickinson Throughout the history of literature, it has often been said that "the poet is the poetry" (Tate, Reactionary 9); that a poets life and experiences greatly influence the style and the content of their writing, some more than others. Emily Dickinson is one of the most renowned poets of her time, recognized for the amount of genuine, emotional insight into life, death, and love she was able to show through her poetry. Many believe her lifestyle and solitude brought her to that point in her writing. During Emily Dickinsons life, she suffered many experiences that eventually sent her into seclusion, and those events, along with her reclusiveness, had a great impact on her poetry. ...
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  • English Story - 1,861 words
    English Story Annonymous Dante Alighieri, one of the greatest poets of the Middle Ages, was born in Florence, Italy on June 5, 1265. He was born to a middle-class Florentine family. At an early age he began to write poetry and became fascinated with lyrics. During his adolescence, Dante fell in love with a beautiful girl named Beatrice Portinari. He saw her only twice but she provided much inspiration for his literary masterpieces. Her death at a young age left him grief-stricken. His first book, La Vita Nuova, was written about her. Sometime before 1294, Dante married Gemma Donati. They had four children. Dante was active in the political and military life of Florence. He entered the army a ...
    Related: middle ages, dante's inferno, ezra pound, satan, humiliation
  • Farewell To Arms By Ernest Hemingway - 1,400 words
    ... oward the end, Ernest started to travel again, but almost the way that someone does who knows that he will soon die. He suddenly started becoming paranoid and to forget things. He became obsessed with sin; his upbringing was showing, but still was inconsistent in his behavior. He never got over feeling like a bad person, as his father, mother and grandfather had taught him. In the last year of his life, he lived inside of his dreams, similar to his mother, who he hated with all his heart. He was suicidal and had electric shock treatments for his depression and strange behavior. On a Sunday morning, July 2, 1961, Ernest Miller Hemingway killed himself with a shotgun. Ernest Hemingway take ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, ernest, ernest hemingway, ernest miller hemingway, farewell, farewell to arms, hemingway
  • John Conrad - 1,409 words
    John Conrad One of the finest stylist of modern English literature was Joseph Conrad, was a Polish-born English novelist, short story writer, essayist, dramatist, and autobiographer. Conrad was born in 1857 in a Russian-ruled Province of Poland. According to Jocelyn Baines, a literary critic, "Conrad was exiled with his parents to northern Russia in 1863 following his his parents participation in the Polish independence movement". (Baines 34). His parents' health rapidly deteriorated in Russia, and after their deaths in 1868, Conrad lived in the homes of relatives, where he was often ill and received spradic schooling (35). Conrad's birth-given name was Jozef Tedor Konrad Valecz Korzeniowski ...
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  • Mark Twain - 620 words
    Mark Twain Samuel Langhorne Clemens is better known as Mark Twain, the distinguished novelist, short story writer, essayist, journalist, and literary critic who ranks among the great figures of American Literature. Twain was born in Florida Missouri, in 1835, To John Marshall Clemens and Jane Lampton. As a new born Twain already had moved four times westward. In 1839 the family moved again, this time eastward to Hannibal, Missouri. Hannibal was a frontier town of less than 500 residents. As small as the town was it offered valuable materials and opportunities for a young writer. Most of the residents knew Samuel well, considering they were on the lower half of the social scale, such as poor ...
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  • Medicinal Marijuana: A Wonder Drug Or Danger To Society - 1,077 words
    Medicinal Marijuana: A Wonder Drug Or Danger To Society? Cannabis sativa, most commonly known as marijuana, has been used for recreational and medical purposes for thousands of years. Many have smoked marijuana to experience the drug's psychedelic effects, while others use the drug to treat various illnesses and pain. Within the past century, however, the drug's medicinal value has come under much scrutiny. Those supporting the legalization of marijuana feel that the government has withheld a soothing drug from those who are suffering from severe illnesses, and as a result, these advocates find the government to be uncompassionate to those in pain. Nevertheless, those against the legalizatio ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug addiction, drug addicts, drug treatment, medicinal, medicinal marijuana
  • Oscar Wilde - 662 words
    Oscar Wilde Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde (1854-1900) was an Anglo-Irish dramatist, novelist, essayist, short-story writer, critic, and poet. He was part of the Decadence, a loosely affiliated coterie of writers and artists of the 1890s whose lives and works manifested a highly stylized, decorative manner, a fascination with morbidity and perversity, and an adherence to the doctrine "art for art's sake." After having a hard childhood, where he was dressed as a girl until the age of nine, he viewed life more critically than others. He often focused in on the upper class, and wrote of their absurdity, superficiality, and snobbery. Yet mainly, he wrote of what he felt at the time and wha ...
    Related: oscar, oscar wilde, wilde, upper class, importance of being earnest
  • Rachel Carson Through The Years - 1,051 words
    ... n Action, took her back into the field. As part of her research, she visited the Florida Everglades, Parker River in Massachusetts, and Chincoteague Islands in the Chesapeake Bay. After the war, Carson began work on a new book that focussed on oceanography. She was now at liberty to use previously classified government research data on oceanography, which included a number of technical and scientific breakthroughs. As part of her research, she did some undersea diving off the Florida during the summer of 1949. She battled skeptical administrators to arrange a deep-sea cruise to Georges Bank near Nova Scotia aboard the Fish and Wildlifw Service's research vessel, the Albatross III. Entitl ...
    Related: carson, rachel, rachel carson, president jimmy carter, silver spring
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson - 415 words
    Ralph Waldo Emerson Ralph Waldo Emerson was a famous American essayist and poet. Through his life he faced many conflicts such as his career. He was one of Americas most influential authors and thinkers. Before Emerson began to write he was a minister. Emerson had to deal with many things throughout his life for example his health and family problems. Ralph Emerson had a very frustrating childhood. Emerson was born on May 25, 1803, in Boston, Massachusetts. He was the second of five sons. Poverty and sickness marked Emersons life. His father died when hi was eight years old. Which left his mother to raise five boys. One of his younger brothers was mentally ill and spent most of his life in i ...
    Related: emerson, ralph, ralph emerson, ralph waldo, ralph waldo emerson, waldo, waldo emerson
  • Ray Bradbury - 611 words
    Ray Bradbury "It was a special pleasure to see things eaten, to see things blackened and changed. With the brass nozzle in his fists, with this great python spitting its venomous kerosene upon the world, the blood pounded in his head, and his hands were the hands of some amazing conductor playing all the symphonies of blazing and burning to bring down the tatters and charcoal ruins of history. With his symbolic helmet numbered 451 on his stolid head, and his eyes all orange flame with the thought of what came next, he flicked the igniter and the house jumped up in a gorging fire that burned the evening sky red and yellow and black. He strode in a swarm of fireflies. He wanted above all, like ...
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  • Robert Penn Warren, Born In Guthrie, Kentucky In 1905, Was One Of The Twentieth Centurys Most Eminent American Writers He Was - 997 words
    Robert Penn Warren, born in Guthrie, Kentucky in 1905, was one of the twentieth century's most eminent American writers. He was a distinguished novelist and poet, literary critic, essayist, short story writer, and coeditor of numerous textbooks. He also a founding editor of The Southern Review, a journal of literary criticism and political thought. The primary influences on Robert Warren's career as a poet were probably his Kentucky boyhood, and his relationships with his father and his maternal grandfather. As a boy, Warren spent many hours on his grandfather's farm, absorbing stories of the Civil War and the local tobacco wars between growers and wholesalers, the subject of his first novel ...
    Related: american, american literature, american poetry, american writers, century poetry, eminent, kentucky
  • Spirit Of A Late Victorian Age - 759 words
    Spirit Of A Late Victorian Age The Spirit of a late Victorian Age. With reference to Bram Stoker's Dracula. Stoker's monstrous figure, Count Dracula, has today reached epic and almost mythical proportions, like Frankestein (not the doctor), the Gordon Medusa, even Virginia Woolf (thanks to Albee). Like the aforementioned examples, what we associate in our minds to be these monsters, mostly conditioned by popular culture and Hollywood, are merely visual representation. In the novel itself, however, according to other essayists who have thoroughly examined this piece, Dracula represents an entire genre of thinking and human development, concentrated in the prose of literature. Mark M. Hennelly ...
    Related: victorian, literary device, church of england, virginia woolf, wasteland
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