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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: espionage

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  • Espionage In Wwii - 1,106 words
    Espionage In Wwii Many of us can remember playing childhood games when we were younger. One of my personal favorites was hide and seek. My favorite part of the game was when I was hiding and tried to watch where the seeker looked while he or she searched. Of course I could have been caught, but it wasn't a big deal at the time. What would happen though if the seeker didn't know who he was looking for, but knew someone was hiding? How would he go about finding the person? Further more how much more could the person accomplish if they were hiding right in front of them, but the seeker did not know? Well it may sound a little off, but that was basically the game of espionage. Spies would try to ...
    Related: espionage, wwii, world war i, north africa, vital
  • Espionage In Wwii - 1,059 words
    ... for the Americans because they had a great deciphering man in Friedman. Friedman's group of mathematicians and intelligence was called the Magicians. [77] Throughout the war they helped decipher many Japanese originated messages that were critical military moves. [81] One of the greatest moves Friedman made was in the interception of the fortifications of Normandy, which made D-Day possible. [81] His efforts led to the creation of a counterpart of PURPLE that allowed the USA to decipher its' messages. [81] The Magicians and Friedman played a major role in making the defeat of Japan and Germany possible by deciphering messages and creating counterparts to cipher machines. Another help th ...
    Related: espionage, wwii, german military, oxford university, prepare
  • Alfred Hitchcock - 1,409 words
    ALFRED HITCHCOCK He was known to his audiences as the 'Master of Suspense' and what Hitchcock mastered was not only the art of making films but also the task of taming his own imagination. Director of many works such as Vertigo, Psycho, The Birds and The 39 steps, Hitchcock told his stories through intelligent plots, witty dialogue and tales of mystery and murder. In doing so, he inspired a new generation of film makers and revolutionized the thriller film, making him a legend around the world. His brilliance was sometimes too bright: He was hated as well as loved. Hitchcock was unusual, inventive, impassioned, yet demanding. Alfred Joseph Hitchcock was born on August 13, 1899(Sennet 108). H ...
    Related: alfred, alfred hitchcock, hitchcock, american justice, horror film
  • As A Tool For National Security, Counterintelligence Is As Important As The Armed Services, If Not More So By Definition, Cou - 1,110 words
    ... rintelligence function (Master Chief Anderson, USN. Interview). This information is then used to circumvent the threat agencys attempts at blocking other agencies or departments in gathering intelligence. Another useful function that should be sought is the agent provocateur. This specially trained agent feigns exploitation to a threat intelligence agency. The threat agency then attempts to recruit this person. The counterintelligence unit then attempts to entrap or expose or even turn this enemy operator. Sometimes, the counterintelligence unit may even ask the agent provocateur to cooperate with the enemy agency to learn more about what the agency is attempting to collect, and why they ...
    Related: armed, counterintelligence, national security, policy makers, soviet union
  • Authorship Theory - 1,081 words
    Authorship Theory For a host of persuasive but commonly disregarded reasons, the Earl of Oxford has quietly become by far the most compelling man to be found behind the mask of Shake-speare. As Orson Welles put it in 1954, I think Oxford wrote Shakespeare. If you don't agree, there are some awful funny coincidences incidences to explain away. Some of these coincidences are obscure, others are hard to overlook. A 1578 Latin encomium to Oxford, for example, contains some highly suggestive praise: Pallas lies concealed in thy right hand, it says. Thine eyes flash fire; Thy countenance shakes spears. Elizabethans knew that Pallas Athena was known by the sobriquet the spear-shaker. The hyphen in ...
    Related: authorship, christopher marlowe, edmund spenser, common sense, theater
  • Biometrics Security - 1,381 words
    Biometrics Security Biometrics uses personal characteristics to identify users. When it comes to security, mapping unique patterns and traits in fingerprints, irises or voices is considered light years ahead of forcing employees to memorize combinations of letters and numbers -- which are easily compromised and easily forgotten. The technology works by taking measurements -- whether it is the weight and length of bones in the hand or the pattern of blood vessels inside the eye or the pattern of fingerprints -- and then storing the specifics, often called minutiae, in a database. When a user scans a hand or retina, the new mapping is compared with the stored data. Access is either granted or ...
    Related: security issues, right person, big brother, help desk, employee
  • Branch - 1,159 words
    Branch King a true pillar of civil rights movement By Stuart Levitan, May 22, 1998 Our greatest mass movement has a historian able to tell its overwhelming story. The civil rights movement of the early 1960s, a transcendent time in American life, played out an epochal saga of biblical proportions. The stakes were immense -- first freedom, then the franchise. The risk was absolute. The actors, whether heroic or villainous, were towering figures. Taylor Branch's Pulitzer Prize-winning Parting the Waters'' (1988) was sweeping, subtle, overwhelming, depressing, inspiring. Pillar of Fire,'' second of Branch's movement trilogy, covering 1963-65, is as good or better. Branch chronicles a staggering ...
    Related: branch, justice department, civil rights, civil rights movement, romantic
  • Capital Puinishment - 1,670 words
    ... fers. The methods of capital punishment in use in 1997 included hanging, firing squad, electrocution, suffocation in the lethal gas chamber, and lethal injection (NCADP). The traditional execution by hanging is still used in a few states today. Death on the gallows can make for a slow and agonizing demise by strangulation if the drop is too short. Or, if the drop is too long, the head will be torn off. Two states still use the firing squad method, in which the condemned is hooded, strapped into a chair, and a target is pinned on the chest. Five marksmen take aim and fire (NCADP). During the twentieth century, electrocution has been the most widely applied form of execution in the United ...
    Related: capital punishment, albert camus, human life, violent crime, intensity
  • Capital Punishment In History - 1,146 words
    ... n is demise by firing squad. There is reportedly no specific protocol for this procedure, which according to information from published reports, involves a five man team. Four out of the five use blank bullets, so that no one will know who the real shooter is. Since its reinstatement in 1976, there have only been 2 executed; Gary Gilmore and John Taylor. Where there is the death penalty there are moral concerns. When ever you have a person dying in a situation that is controversial, there will be some serious moral concerns. There have been many moral arguments in favor and many arguments that are against. Many of the moral concerns in favor have been biblical and retributive. Supporters ...
    Related: capital punishment, history, punishment, human rights, the bible
  • China And Spying - 1,177 words
    China And Spying Is $39 million too much to spend, on rattraps, in the future? Not according to Senate and House negotiators. In a recent article in the L.A. Times, the Senate and House reportedly are increasing spending on operations against spying by $20 million. The last rat trapped was caught almost 15 years after a significant amount of top-secret information was leaked from the U S to China. The U S must crack down on spying in order to for our safety as a country. The government must be more enforcing against espionage in the U S. China has blatantly showed us that we have flaws in our system and need to crack down on spying opportunities in the U S. Sources from China claim that by 1 ...
    Related: china, spying, department of energy, angeles times, senate
  • China Us Relations - 1,423 words
    China US Relations China, for most of its 3500 years of history, China led the world in agriculture, crafts, and science. It fell behind in the 19th century when the Industrial Revolution gave the West clear superiority in military and economic affairs. In the first half of the 20th century, China continued to suffer from major famines, civil unrest, military defeat, and foreign occupation. After World War II, the Communists under Mao Tse Tung established a dictatorship that, while ensuring autonomy of China, imposed strict controls over all aspects of like and cost the lives of tens of millions of people. After 1978, his successor Deng Xiaoping decentralized economic decision making; output ...
    Related: century china, china, trade relations, world trade, law enforcement
  • Computer Crime - 811 words
    Computer Crime Sforza-1 John Sforza Miss. Hilleman English 10R December 7, 1999 Computer Crime Computer crime is defined as a criminal act that has been committed With a computer as the principle tool(Judson, 30). These computer criminals are people with advanced knowledge of operating systems, phone systems, and other computer related devices. Some computer criminals break into other people's computers, and steal data, these criminals are known as hackers. Yet others might make a phone call without even paying for it, or receive phone services that they did not pay for, these people are known as phreakers. And yet there are other computer criminals that illegally copy software, these crimin ...
    Related: computer crime, computer games, crime, pirated software, russian government
  • Computer Crime - 1,151 words
    Computer Crime In todays society our most valuable commodity is not grain, steel or even technology; it is information. Because of computer networks, just about everyone can now access an astounding range of information. The Internet is international, even though 80 percent of the Internet use occurs in the United States, and a staggering amount of information on every subject imaginable is available for free. Because so many people now have access, computer crimes have become more frequent. Everyone with a computer and a modem can commit a computer crime if so inclined. Anyone, conceivably, could become a "white collar" computer criminal. When the term "white collar" crime came into wide sp ...
    Related: collar crime, computer crime, computer networks, computer security, computer systems, crime, violent crime
  • Computer Crimes - 1,159 words
    Computer Crimes Computer crime started in the early 1970s and has become more and more prevalent. Some computer crime are committed by outside individuals that hack into a computer system. These are the people that usually steal data and cause data loss by vandalism. The most common kind of computer crime is espionage committed by people who work for a company, but this is also the one that you rarely hear about. They usually enter false data that will end up making money for them. Hackers are the worlds new bread of criminals and will soon pose a major threat to the U.S. Because America has become largely a computer society everyone is at risk, experts say, and should protect information ab ...
    Related: computer crime, computer system, computer virus, crime data, exchange commission
  • Computer Crimes On The Internet - 1,436 words
    Computer Crimes on the Internet Thesis: Emerging with the Internet, a group of elite cyber-surfers have turned into todays computer hackers. Software piracy is a major crime on the Net. $7.5 billion of American Software is stolen each year. Industrial Espionage is gaining access to remote sites illegally. Stealing of information from corporate sites is extremely illegal. Password Sniffers are used to get someones password. IP spoofers changes your identity. Many things can be stolen from companies. III. Email hacking is common. Mail bombs are thousands of messages send to a single address. Email forgery can cause people reputations to get ruined. Anonymous Email is illegal. Fraud is very com ...
    Related: computer crime, computer viruses, internet access, internet protocol, internet service, internet service provider, internet works
  • Computer Security Issues - 883 words
    Computer Security Issues Computer Security Issues Facing Alsager Ltd. In upgrading the Alsager Ltd IT facilities, despite numerous advantages that the new systems brings one has to be made aware of the possible threats posing. Virus can effect the system. They are pieces of codes created by hacker to create a nuisances and to another extreme corrupt valuable data. Examples of these can be animated icons flying pass the computer screen and to another extreme can be programmes designed to delete the hard drive. The Computer Virus can be caught through a number of ways. The most highly publicised way, is through the Internet, other ways are through removable storage media, such as floppy disks ...
    Related: computer networks, computer security, computer virus, security issues, floppy disk
  • Crime Is Inevitably One Of The Biggest Problems That Faces The Modern World Today It Can Be Found All Over The World, Whether - 1,334 words
    Crime is inevitably one of the biggest problems that faces the modern world today. It can be found all over the world, whether in large cities or small villages. Over time, society has tried to find ways to deal with crime. Such methods include community service, paying a fine serving some time in prison, and in the case of more serious crimes, the death penalty. This is the case in some states in the U.S. where persons have been executed for aggravated assault, rape, kidnapping, armed robbery, sabotage and espionage. Advocates for capital punishment feel that it deters criminals from committing crime and that if the criminal is not executed, the risk later extends to the community as such p ...
    Related: crime, modern world, over time, violent crime, world today
  • Crimes Of Cia And Opec In 1975 - 1,515 words
    Crimes Of Cia And Opec In 1975 The Crimes Of The CIA OPEC Stalling On New Price Oil 1. Intro A. Why the events were important B. The basic problems that came with these events C. Why they could have happened 2. Paragraph 1 A. Rockefeller Papers B. How it influenced the people about the accusations 3. Paragraph 2 A. CIA incidents B. What they were accused of C. The accusations 4. Paragraph 3 A. OPEC B. Describe the events that lead up to this C. Why OPEC decided to do this D. US response to the oil prices 5. Paragraph 4 A. How these tie together or how they don't B. Influences on society C. Over all reactions 6. Conclusion A. Bring together all thoughts B. How some of this could have been sol ...
    Related: opec, government officials, south east, washington post, till
  • Cyber Terrorism - 1,217 words
    Cyber Terrorism The face of global terrorism as we knew it to be 50 odd years ago is changing rapidly with the advancement of technology in todays society. Be it a kid trying to get his kicks bypassing the security or his local Internet Service Provider, or an established terrorist trying to get classified information, the amount of funds we put into protecting ourselves from cyberterrorism is not nearly enough if we were to think about what could be at harm. The vulnerability of commercial systems to cyberattacks is repeatedly demonstrated by events portrayed in the media and, there is no evidence that non-government systems are any more or less vulnerable than government ones, or that the ...
    Related: cyber, cyber terrorism, global terrorism, terrorism, gross domestic
  • Czech Republic - 1,832 words
    Czech Republic Senator Joseph McCarthys political career was in danger when he walked into the Colony Restaurant in Washington, DC for dinner with three of his friends. The date was January 7, 1950. A month earlier, he had been voted worst U.S. Senator in a poll of Senate correspondents. In his earlier years as Senator, he had been known for taking loans and funds from businesses totaling $30,000. This included the Pepsi-Cola company, which earned him the nickname Pepsi-Cola Joe1, and the Lustron Corporation, which dealt in prefabricated houses. About this time McCarthy was also deemed responsible for the resignation of Senate subcommittee chairman Raymond E. Baldwin, who left politics citin ...
    Related: czech, czech republic, republic, average american, eastern europe
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