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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: american experience

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  • Secrecy: The American Experience By Senator Daniel P Moynihan - 1,164 words
    Secrecy: The American Experience By Senator Daniel P. Moynihan According to a survey performed for the Defense Department in 1996, it was found that the majority of U.S. citizens believe that the government withholds too much information by classifying it as a secret. In this book, Secrecy: The American Experience, Senator Daniel P. Moynihan reinforces that view. This is a distinctive book with numerous weaknesses, some errors, and one great strength. The weakness is that the book shows controversial arguments rather than a policy analysis. Moynihan has a particular view he wants to advance, and he is not interested in considering alternate explanations or exploring evidence that is contradi ...
    Related: american, american experience, american nation, american people, daniel, senator
  • The American Experience In - 1,226 words
    The American Experience In The American Experience In The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test Mass Comm and Society Late November, 2000 Kesey in la casa grande with the wind up and the sky cloudy, and the Gulp flapping, and the Rat plaster paneled with pages from out of Marvel comics, with whole scenes of Dr. Strange, Sub Mariner, the Incredible Hulk, the Fantastic Four, the Human Torch--Superheroes, in short. All heads believe them to be drawn by meth freaks, because of the minute phosphorescent dedication of their hands. Superheroes! Ubermenschen! (Tom Woolfe, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, page 288). The Electric Kool-Aid Acid test by Tom Woolfe is a lovely piece of literary journalism cooked u ...
    Related: american, american experience, american flag, american journalism, modern american
  • The American Experience In - 1,185 words
    ... presentations of any sortthe Acid Tests. And yet, there was nothing irreligious about any of this. The Pranksters seeming apprehension of the metaphysical was forming a religion all its own; an American religion. No shrines, no sacraments. Buuuut, as Woolfe began to muse out loud: The experiencethat was the word! And it began to fall into place. In fact, none of the great founded religions, Christianity, Buddhism, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Zoroastrianism, Hinduism, none of them began with a philosophical framework or even a main idea. They all began with an overwhelming new experience, what Joachim Welch called the experience of the holy, and Max Weber, possession of the deity, the sense ...
    Related: american, american experience, american religion, absolute truth, holy spirit
  • A Booming End To The 19th Century - 1,105 words
    A Booming End To The 19Th Century More changes occurred in America in the late 19th century than any other time period. The country went through rapid expansion from residents of its land to cuisine to transportation of goods and people. While the last quarter of the 20th century brought many modern conveniences, the century before brought this country things that would be nearly impossible to live without. The development of railroads was the single greatest change in the 19th century. In only twenty-five years, almost 70,000 miles of tracks were laid. This in itself was a great feat, because of all the people and products used in the building of the railroads. In order to build railroads, ...
    Related: civil war, conspicuous consumption, raw materials, layout, telephone
  • Aaron Douglas - 1,128 words
    Aaron Douglas People may ask, what other than a tornado can come out of Kansas? Well, Aaron Douglas was born of May 26, 1899 in Topeka, Kansas. Aaron Douglas was a "Pioneering Africanist" artist who led the way in using African- oriented imagery in visual art during the Harlem Renaissance of 1919- 1929. His work has been credited as the catalyst for the genre incorporating themes in form and style that affirm the validity of the black consciousness and experience in America. His parents were Aaron and Elizabeth Douglas. In 1922, he graduated from the University of Nebraska School of Fine Arts in Lincoln. Who thought that this man would rise to meet W.E.B. Du Bois's 1921 challenge, calling fo ...
    Related: aaron, douglas, negro history, american experience, breath
  • Alcoholismnature Or Nuture - 1,645 words
    Alcoholism-Nature Or Nuture? INTRODUCTION: Alcoholism can affect anyone. It has enormous costs as it pertains to societies, families, and individuals. It is not prejudicial towards any race, color, sex, religion, or economic level. Although we do have ideas as to what alcoholism is, what we do not know is the exact cause(s) of this problem. Researchers are continually seeking answers to the long-standing nature versus nurture debate. Different views are split between a biological paradigm and a physchological paradigm. No one explanation seems to be better than another is. I will present views of the effects alcoholism has on society and an insight to the factors that serve to fuel the natur ...
    Related: different views, social customs, urban areas, regulate, health
  • American Hero - 1,069 words
    American Hero Every child has fantasys of being a super hero and leaping tall buildings in a single bound or staring death in the face everyday and somehow finding a way to escape. All of these imaginative thoughts have been derived from the past literary works by the great writers of the early American literary period. These early writers entered society into a world of action and adventure, where one can see spectacular events unfolding through the eyes of a notorious man of courage and feel as though they are defending there country or saving the woman they love. Though the modern heroes are much more popular than classic American heroes, the modern hero has rooted from these same literar ...
    Related: american, american experience, american hero, american life, american literary, american literature, early american
  • Amy Tan - 1,551 words
    Amy Tan Kaitlin Sump Amy Tan was born in 1952, in Oakland, California to Chinese immigrants John and Daisy Tan. Her family eventually settled in Santa Clara. When Tan was in her early teens, her father and one of her brothers died of brain tumors within months of each other. During this period Tan learned that her mother had been married before, to an abusive husband in China. After divorcing him, her mother fled China during the Communist takeover, leaving three daughters behind who she would not see again for nearly forty years. After losing her husband and son, Daisy moved her family to Switzerland where Tan finished high school. During these years, mother and daughter argued over what Ta ...
    Related: the joy luck club, chinese american, san jose, jing-mei
  • Beloved - 2,213 words
    Beloved Toni Morrison's Pulitzer Prize winning book Beloved, is a historical novel that serves as a memorial for those who died during the perils of slavery. The novel serves as a voice that speaks for the silenced reality of slavery for both men and women. Morrison in this novel gives a voice to those who were denied one, in particular African American women. It is a novel that rediscovers the African American experience. The novel undermines the conventional idea of a story's time scheme. Instead, Morrison combines the past and the present together. The book is set up as a circling of memories of the past, which continuously reoccur in the book. The past is embedded in the present, and the ...
    Related: beloved, last time, men and women, sweet home, sethe
  • Blaxploitation - 1,352 words
    Blaxploitation The Emergence of Colour In todays culturally diverse, politically correct society, it is hard to believe that at one time racism was not only accepted as the norm, but enjoyed for its entertainment value. Individuals of African descent in North America today take the large, diverse pool of opportunities offered by the film industry for granted. Much like Canadian theatre however, there was a time when a black man in any role, be it servant or slave, was virtually unheard of. It took the blaxpliotation films of the early nineteen seventies to change the stereotypical depiction of Black people in American Cinema, as it took The Farm Story, performed by a small troop of Canadian ...
    Related: film industry, ultimate goal, civil war, lucas, nigger
  • Carl Sandburg - 1,717 words
    Carl Sandburg As a child of an immigrant couple, Carl Sandburg was barely American himself, yet the life, which he had lived, has defined key aspects of our great country, and touched the hearts and minds of her people. Sandburg grew up in the American Midwest, yet spent the majority of his life traveling throughout the states. The country, which would define his style of poetry and his views of society, government, and culture, would equally be defined by his writing, lecturing, and the American dream he lived: The dream of becoming successful with only an idea and the will to use it. Historically, Sandburg's most defining poetic element is his free verse style. His open views towards Ameri ...
    Related: carl, carl sandburg, sandburg, puerto rico, american dream
  • Culture Awareness - 1,454 words
    Culture Awareness I was planning to take a leisurely trip this summer, but now I think I'll have to change my plans. Instead I'll probably have to take a crash course in Sensitivity for the Culturally Unaware. Maybe it's because I grew up in Chicago, perhaps the most culturally diverse city in the country. Maybe it's because I have a mulatto niece and nephew. Maybe it's because my cousin's last name is now Hernandez. Maybe it's because my wife's cousin is a Native American. Or maybe it's because we Poles have borne the brunt of more jokes than any other ethnic group, but all this time I thought I was aware of other cultures and the feelings of members of other ethnic groups and minorities. N ...
    Related: awareness, interstate highway, american experience, speed limits, pride
  • Death Of A Salesman By Arthur Miller 1915 - 1,794 words
    Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller (1915 - ) Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller (1915 - ) Type of Work: Dramatic play Setting New York and Boston; 1949 Principal Characters Willy Loman, a disgruntled traveling salesman Linda, his wife Biff, Willy's favorite and most athletic son Happy, another son Play Overveiw (Like many plays, this one shifts back and forth in time and place. We view much of the Loman family's daily life through the eyes and mind of the father.) Nobody believes more fervently in the American Dream than Willy, yet the dream has somehow eluded him. Now he is sixty years old, a beaten and discouraged traveling salesman, with nothing to show for a lifetime of hard work but ...
    Related: arthur, arthur miller, death of a salesman, miller, salesman
  • Edgar Allan Poe - 1,226 words
    ... events are what gives his stories a scent of truth. In one particular case, Poe wrote a passage in his story of "Marginalia" that could only apply to a person such as himself: I have sometimes amused myself by endeavoring to fancy what would be the fate of any individual gifted, or rather accursed, with an intellect very far superior to that of his race. Of course, he would be conscious of his superiority; nor could he (if otherwise constituted as man is) help manifesting his consciousness. This he would make himself enemies at all points. And since his opinions and speculations would widely differ from those of all mankind - that he would be considered a madman, is evident. How horribly ...
    Related: allan, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, prentice hall
  • Farewell To Manzanar - 1,448 words
    Farewell To Manzanar In spring of 1942, immediately after the United States entered war with Japan, the Federal government instructed a policy where hundreds of thousands of people of Japanese ancestry were evacuated into relocation camps. Many agree that the United States government was not justified with their treatment towards the Japanese during World War II. This Japanese-American experience of incarceration is believed to be unconstitutional, demonstrating racism and causing social and economic hardships for the evacuees. The location of one of the camps in California, Manzanar, "was representative of the atmosphere of racial prejudice, mistrust, and fear, that resulted in American cit ...
    Related: farewell, farewell to manzanar, manzanar, agricultural production, racial prejudice
  • Feminist Backlash: The Unconscious - 1,368 words
    ... to the feelings of powerlessness. It is not productive to blame men for these barriers; however, no one is without blame. Many women, however, do not feel helpless. In one of Fox-Genoveses interviews with women, she writes of Maggie, who moved, with her husband, to a ranch in New Mexico. They split the work "traditionally" and Maggie was not enjoying her job. She discussed the situation with her husband who understood her dislike for the monotonous work. She joined him and the other male hands in the fields; she now loved her job. She stated she is not a feminist; that it "has nothing to with her life, and feminists... would not last two days on her ranch." How and when these battles be ...
    Related: feminist, unconscious, temple university, new mexico, piercy
  • From The Dream To The Womb - 1,355 words
    From The Dream To The Womb From the Dream to the Womb: Visionary Impulse and Political Ambivalence in The Great Gatsby It seems hard to believe in our period, when a three-decade lurch to the political Right has anathematized the word, but F. Scott Fitzgerald once, rather fashionably, believed himself to be a socialist. Some years before, he had also, less fashionably, tried hard to think himself a Catholic. While one hardly associates the characteristic setting of Fitzgerald's novels, his chosen kingdom of the sybaritic fabulous, with either proletarian solidarity or priestly devotions, it will be the argument of this essay that a tension between Left and religiose perspectives structures t ...
    Related: dream, womb, roaring twenties, greek philosophy, largely
  • Gatbys Symbols - 558 words
    Gatbys Symbols Searching for Symbolism -HS 1. The valley of ashes represents a modern world, which, like a grotesque hell created by the industry of factories and trains and has polluted America with its waste. The valley symbolizes a world whose inhabitants are so spiritually lost they, like Myrtle, begin to worship money and wealth. The frontier promise has been corrupted by the lies of greed and the emptiness of a dream based on wealth. 2. The eyes of Dr. T.J. Eckleburg represent Fitzgeralds feeling that God and religion had taken a less substantial role in comparison with the gods that wield the powers of wealth, status, and greed. The character has a godly presence associated with him a ...
    Related: american experience, modern world, modern society, comparison, substantial
  • Great Gatsby Comparison Of Nick And Gatsby - 314 words
    Great Gatsby - Comparison of Nick and Gatsby In the novel, The Great Gatsby, Nick first sees Gatsby as new rich, neighbor, that parties and wishes to live in East Egg. He becomes friends with Jay and gets to know him as a guy that thinks you can always turn back time. He dreams of Daisy, his Golden Girl, and tries to make things the way they were before. Jay Gatsby, unlike Nick, doesnt developing the course of the novel. His whole life is devoted to the fulfillment of a romantic dream he created at a very early age. By its very nature, his dream requires an adolescent faith amounting to self delusion to sustain it. Nick soon discovers Gatsbys and Daisys relationship and their long affair. He ...
    Related: comparison, gatsby, great gatsby, jay gatsby, nick, the great gatsby
  • Hurston Novels - 1,247 words
    Hurston Novels The Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s is a great time for black artists; it is a rebirth of art, music, books and poetry. In Zora Neale Hurstons novel Their Eyes Were Watching God Janie, the protagonist, is treated kindly for a black women. She does not go through the torment of black culture during that era or the previous eras. Throughout the book Hurston "fibs" about racial oppression. Janie gets respect by the white people she encounters. Hurston makes the reader imagine that African-American life is easygoing. Richard Writes critique of Their Eyes Were Watching God is accurate and therefore, the book should not be included in the Harlem Renaissance. Hurston breaks several o ...
    Related: hurston, novels, african american, american life, diction
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