Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: enzyme

  • 123 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • Enzyme Catalase - 1,454 words
    Enzyme Catalase INTRODUCTION The enzyme catalase speeds up the decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide into water and oxygen as shown here, 2H2O2-------------------*2H2O+O2. It is one of the fastest known enzymes and its turnover number is 6 million, which means the number of substrate molecules which one molecule of the enzyme turns to products per minute. This can be demonstrated by putting a piece of liver into a beaker of Hydrogen Peroxide, the fizzing shows a demonstration of the enzyme in action. AIM My aim is to examine how the concentration of the substrate hydrogen peroxide affects the enzyme catalase. INVESTIGATION I am going to investigate the effect of varying the substrate concentrat ...
    Related: catalase, enzyme, kinetic energy, decreasing, investigation
  • Enzyme Catalase - 1,412 words
    ... ays used 20ml) every time I increased the concentration by 10% I increased the H2O2 by 2ml and decreased the H2O by 2ml. A problem did occur at one point when I was doing my experiment for TRIAL 1 for the substrate concentration of 30%, it took a long time, much longer to get to 20ml of gas produced its time was no where near the previous concentration it had no pattern, so I stopped it and I repeated it again then it was alright it took normal time it was in pattern with the other concentrations. Probably the reason for the reaction at that particular concentration to take that long when I did it first might have been that the enzyme must of deteriated fast or when I put the enzyme in t ...
    Related: catalase, enzyme, kinetic energy, fatty acids, sample
  • A Personal Information - 1,287 words
    A. Personal Information Arthur Kornberg (1918-), American biochemist and physician, claims he has never met "a dull enzyme." He has devoted his life to pursuing and purifying these critical protein molecules. His love of science did not spring from a family history rooted in science. He was born on March 3rd, 1918, the son of a sewing machine operator in the sweatshops of the Lower East Side of New York City. His parents, Joseph Aaron Kornberg and Lena Rachel Katz, were immigrant Jews who made great sacrifices to ensure the safety of their family. They had fled Poland, for if they had stayed, they would have been murdered in a German concentration camp. His grandfather had abandoned the pate ...
    Related: personal information, national institute, york city, lincoln high school, spending
  • Abstract On Rose Diseases - 2,112 words
    ... by 1970, most of the garden roses in the United States were infected. Since then, heat therapy programs have been initiated at the Oregon State University and the University of California at Davis, as well as by Bear Creek (parent company of Jackson & Perkins Roses and Armstrong Roses). The Oregon State program is now nearly defunct. Some commercial rose nurseries have made use of those programs and now offer virus-free plants for sale. However, many nurseries have not made any attempt to provide healthy plants, and a large percentage of the roses grown and sold in Florida are infected. Florida nurseries using Fortuniana as a rootstock are at a particular disadvantage, since scion-source ...
    Related: abstract, washington state university, state university, washington state, sending
  • Active Transport - 1,302 words
    Active Transport Since the cell membrane is somewhat permeable to sodium ions, simple diffusion would result in a net movement of sodium ions into the cell, until the concentrations on the two sides of the membrane became equal. Sodium actually does diffuse into the cell rather freely, but as fast as it does so, the cell actively pumps it out again, against the concentration difference. The mechanism by which the cell pumps the sodium ions out is called active transport. Active transport requires the expenditure of energy for the work done by the cell in moving molecules against a concentration gradient. Active transport enables a cell to maintain a lower concentration of sodium inside the c ...
    Related: transport, early stages, carbon dioxide, carried away, chloroplasts
  • Aging Theories - 1,709 words
    Aging Theories This report outlines the main theories of how the process of aging works. Since researchers have not discovered a universally-accepted theory of aging, the theories discussed are potential explanations of how we age. The likelihood of each hypothesis is considered roughly equal. The different theories discussed focus on the workings of different parts of the body, from the molecular level of DNA mutations and replication, to the organism level of becoming "worn out." Aging is a very complex and gradual process, and its ongoing operation is present to some degree in all individuals. It is a journey to the maturity, as well as to the degeneration of the body. Because aging affec ...
    Related: aging, aging process, cell division, free radicals, gradual
  • Aging Theories - 1,767 words
    ... ter a certain number of divisions, the clock genes are triggered and may produce proteins responsible for cell destruction (Keeton, 1992, 50). Cellular Aging In 1961, a discovery made by Leonard Hayflick showed that normal, diploid cells from such continually Areplaced@ parts of the body as skin, lungs, and bone marrow, divide a limited number of times. Although the cells stop dividing at the point just before DNA synthesis, they do not die. The longer-lived the species, the more divisions the cells undergo. As the age of an individual increases, the number of potential divisions decreases (Ricklefs and Finch, 1995, 29). This discovery was found using fibroblasts, or cells found in the c ...
    Related: aging, aging process, bone fracture, concise encyclopedia, testosterone
  • Aids And Retroviruses - 1,241 words
    AIDS And Retroviruses Today, tens of millions of people around the world are going to die young because they are infected by HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The primary AIDS virus is HIV-1, which can be spread via sexual intercourse or drug use (activities, which result in body fluid exchange like blood and semen). HIV can also be passed from mother to child and can also be acquired during blood transfusions. AIDS, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, is a virus that causes a loss of protection against disease causing microorganisms. People who are infected by AIDS usually have a decline in the number of T-cells that are responsible for their immune system. Because the virus reproduces by a ...
    Related: aids, immune system, deficiency syndrome, fact sheet, mediate
  • Aids And Retroviruses - 1,286 words
    ... AP) to a cellular receptor. Receptor molecules can be proteins (glycoproteins), or the sugar residues present on glycoproteins or glycolipids. Some complex viruses, for example, Poxviruses and Herpesviruses may have more than one receptor-binding protein, therefore, there may be alternative routes of uptake into cells. The expression or absence of receptors on the surface of cells largely determines the tropism of most viruses, that is, the type of cell in which they are able to replicate.  Penetration Unlike attachment, viral penetration is an energy-dependent process; that is, the cell must be metabolically active for this to occur. Three mechanisms may be involved:  Tr ...
    Related: aids, genetic code, life cycle, immune system, replication
  • Aids Whats New Is The Message Getting Through We Already Know Enough About Aids To Prevent Its Spread, But Ignorance, Complac - 1,708 words
    AIDS - What's new ? ------------------- Is the message getting through? We already know enough about AIDS to prevent its spread, but ignorance, complacency, fear and bigotry continue to stop many from taking adequate precautions. We know enough about how the infection is transmitted to protect ourselves from it without resorting to such extremes as mandatory testing, enforced quarantine or total celibacy. But too few people are heeding the AIDS message. Perhaps many simply don't like or want to believe what they hear, preferring to think that AIDS "can't happen to them." Experts repeatedly remind us that infective agents do not discriminate, but can infect any and everyone. Like other commun ...
    Related: aids, whats, human cells, blood cells, usual
  • Albinism - 576 words
    Albinism Albinism is a term used to describe people and animals that have little or no pigment in their eyes, skin, or hair. People with this condition have inherited genes that do not produce normal amounts of a pigment called melanin. It is equally common to all races and consists of two major classes. The first, Oculocutaneous albinism includes eyes, skin, and hair. Ocular, the second, involves mainly the eye. The oculocutaneous variety can be divided into 10 different types, the most common being ty-negative and ty-positive. Ty-negative leaves the person with no melanin pigmentation, hampers vision to a much more severe degree then ty-positive, and is caused by a genetic defect in the en ...
    Related: different types, defect, crossing, inheritance
  • Alzheimer's: Is There A Cure - 1,058 words
    ... y, 2001). Johnson & Johnson say that the drug will be available starting in May. Another approach to finding a cure for Alzheimer's Disease is finding something that will block molecules that are possibly responsible for the disease. Bob Vassar designed and implemented an ingenious method for isolating the gene for an enzyme called beta-secretase, which is found to be a key culprit in the disease (Garber, 2001). While other drugs that are approved only improve the functions of those with the disease, this method could actually stop the progression, not just slow it down. There are some drawbacks to this method. What is not known about the enzyme beta-secretase, though seemingly linked to ...
    Related: cure, spend time, social change, federal drug administration, psychosis
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,539 words
    Alzheimer`s Disease Alzheimers Disease is a progressive, degenerative disease that affects the brain. Individuals with AD experience a progressive and specific loss of cognitive function resulting from the differentiation of the limbic system, association neocortex, and basal forebrain. It is also accompanied by the deposition of amyloid in plaques and cerebrovasculature, and the formation of neurofibrillary tangles in neurons. Alois Alzheimer, a German doctor, diagnosed this disease for the first time in 1907. At that time it was considered a rare disorder. Currently, this tragic brain disorder affects approximately four million people; It is the most common type of dementia and the fourth ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, physiological processes, limbic system
  • Alzheimers Disease : Neurobiology, Causes And Treatments Of - 960 words
    Alzheimers Disease : Neurobiology, Causes And Treatments Of Alzheimers disease : Neurobiology, causes and treatments of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is one of the most common of the dementing illnesses. A progressive, degenerative disease that attacks the brain, causing impaired memory, thinking and behavior. A person with Alzhiemers Disease may experience personality and behavior changes, impaired judgment, confusion and difficulty finishing thoughts, following directions or even finding the right word to say in a conversation. Once advanced the sufferer may require a caretaker as daily chores become very difficult to accomplish. Evidence points toward amyloid as one of the main causes for the ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, diagnosis treatment, main causes, nitric oxide
  • Alzheimers Disease Is A Progressive And Irreversible Brain Disease That Destroys Mental And Physical Functioning In Human Bei - 725 words
    Alzheimer's Disease is a progressive and irreversible brain disease that destroys mental and physical functioning in human beings, and invariably leads to death. It is the fourth leading cause of adult death in the United States. Alzheimer's creates emotional and financial catastrophe for many American families every year. Fortunately, a large amount of progress is being made to combat Alzheimer's disease every year. To fully be able to comprehend and combat Alzheimer's disease, one must know what it does to the brain, the part of the human body it most greatly affects. Many Alzheimer's disease sufferers had their brains examined. A large number of differences were present when comparing the ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, brain, functioning, human beings, human body, parkinson's disease
  • Amylase - 309 words
    Amylase The enzyme amylase will catalyze the hydrolysis of starch to maltose when the pH is near 7.0. But when the HCl is added to the solution the amylase will be denatured which results in the enzyme being deactivated. The iodine serves as an indicator for the presence of starch. Iodine (I2) will reach with iodide ion to produce the I3- ion. This ion will form a dark blue complex with the starch molecule. Like most chemical reactions, the rate of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction increases as the temperature is raised. A ten degree Centigrade rise in temperature will increase the activity of most enzymes by 50 to 100%. Variations in reaction temperature as small as 1 or 2 degrees may introduce ...
    Related: frozen, adversely, indicator
  • Antibiotics - 1,650 words
    Antibiotics Antibiotics have played a major role in our society thanks to Sir Alexander Fleming's careful observations in 1928. Without it, many lives would be in danger due to infectious diseases. Antibiotics are chemical substances produced by various species of microorganisms and other living systems that are capable in small concentrations of inhibiting the growth of or killing bacteria and other microorganisms. These organisms can be bacteria, viruses, fungi, or animals called protozoa. A particular group of these agents is made up of drugs called antibiotics, from the Greek word anti ("against") and bios ("life"). Some antibiotics are produced from living organisms such as bacteria, fu ...
    Related: medical profession, half lives, printing office, concentration, permanent
  • Antibiotics - 560 words
    Antibiotics Antibiotics are chemical compounds used to kill or inhibit the growth of infectious organisms. Originally the term antibiotic referred only to organic compounds, produced by bacteria or molds, that are toxic to other microorganisms. The term is now used loosely to include synthetic and semisynthetic organic compounds. Antibiotic refers generally to antibacterials; however, because the term is loosely defined, it is preferable to specify compounds as being antimalarials, antivirals, or antiprotozoals. All antibiotics share the property of selective toxicity: They are more toxic to an invading organism than they are to an animal or human host. Penicillin is the most well-known anti ...
    Related: bacterial cell, amino acids, nucleic acids, classified, chromosome
  • Autism - 1,085 words
    ... ternal pleasure. Another theory is that sudden episodes of self-injury may be caused by sub-clinical seizures. An infection of the middle ear is thought to be a cause of the head banging or ear hitting. The last theory is that some forms of self-injury may be a result of over arousal (such as frustration). It acts as a release, and lowers arousal. The social theorists have a different perspective on self-injurious behavior. They believe that the autistic individuals engage in these behaviors to obtain attention from other people. Research on how to treat autism is a continuous process. It also makes it difficult because each child reacts differently to the various treatments. There is no ...
    Related: autism, occupational therapy, dairy products, immune system, auto
  • Bio Outline - 2,398 words
    Bio Outline BIOLOGY 220 OUTLINE SECTION II Text: Essential Cell Biology I. Opening Comments (Chapter 3) A. Life creates order out of disorder through a never-ending series of chemical reactions B. This is Metabolism and the ability to Metabolize C. Most of the chemical reactions required by the cell would not occur at physiological conditions D. Control of these reactions is achieved by specialized protein, ENZYMES. II. Basic Principles of Energy A. Energy - Basics Principles 1. Define Energy - ability to do work 2. Define Work - the ability to change the way matter is arranged 3. Define Kinetic Energy 4. Define Potential energy - energy of position 5. FIRST LAW of THERMODYNAMICS Energy can ...
    Related: outline, energy level, carbon dioxide, basic principles, storage
  • 123 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>