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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: american education

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  • American Education, A Disgrace - 269 words
    American Education, A Disgrace? Americas educational infrastructure is the embodiment of all social programs plagued with fundamental flaws. All one must do to come to this concise conclusion is to view the many aspects of America and its international federalism. After all, education is the platform for success on all levels. The first sign of a failing educational program is a booming economy. Adversaries have made viable attacks on Americas educational program over the past decades as we have remained in the midst of one of the strongest economies in the history of not only our nation, but of the world. Also, being an international political icon shows our deficiencies in the educational ...
    Related: american, american education, disgrace, international political, social programs
  • Communism In The American Education System - 1,438 words
    Communism In The American Education System -Heather McIntyre Senior Seminar 17 January 2001 Communism in the American Education System At the height of the Cold War, a new cartoon emerged. Little blue people called Smurfs sang and skipped into the hearts of the American populace. The good, clean antics of the Smurfs were the model of American values, or were they? One should look closely at the Smurfs, their values, their cultures. Surprise! The Smurfs were not capitalistic at all. They were Communists! Communist practices and doctrine have not only infiltrated American television, but they have also become integral parts of America itself. Communism has even become a part of the American ed ...
    Related: american, american association, american education, american government, american television, american values, communism
  • Communism In The American Education System - 1,428 words
    ... o schools for having children collect items like soup labels or sales receipts from certain stores have increased by 83%, and corporate-sponsored materials that claim to have some kind of instructional content have increased 963%. After factoring in a few other types of media propaganda, the overall propaganda increase between 1990 and 1999 was 303% (Molnar). The USSR also pioneered some interesting programs. One such program was a School to Work Act. In the 1958-1959 school year, the Soviet Union passed new reform laws that required all pupils in the three senior grades of the secondary schools to work in Soviet factories or farms for one-third of their school time (Noah). In other word ...
    Related: american, american education, american school, brown v board of education, communism, department of education, education policy
  • Adult Illiteracy - 3,219 words
    ... atic, enemies of early, intensive teaching of phonics. Frank Smith and Kenneth Goodman are two of today's most influential proponents of the look and say or as they would term it, whole language philosophy of teaching reading. San Diego State University Professor Patrick Groff recently reviewed 43 reading texts, all published in the1980's and used by teachers' colleges in training reading teachers, to see if they included the findings of researchers that the code-emphasis or phonics approach to teaching reading should be used. He found that none of these books advocate phonics. In fact, only nine of these books inform teachers that there is current debate about if or when phonics should ...
    Related: adult, adult education, adult literacy, illiteracy, state university
  • Ap American History - 642 words
    AP American History Early American Nationalism and Reform The rise of immigration in the mid 17th century lead to a spirit of national reform in the United States. Many Europeans, particularly the Irish and the German, immigrated to America during the 1800s. There were many different reasons for their immigration, and when they came they influenced American culture greatly. The United States changed religiously, because of the German and Irish, politically because of the German and Irish, and economically/socially by virtue of the conflicts between the Irish and the blacks and the influence of the Germans on education. When the Germans and the Irish immigrated to America, they greatly affect ...
    Related: american, american culture, american economy, american education, american history, american political, american politicians
  • Borrowed Ethics - 2,834 words
    Borrowed Ethics Borrowed Ethics The past three decades have witnessed a remarkable growth in private Christian education, both in Christian day schools and in homeschooling. The effort has not been in vain. Standardized test scores repeatedly show that students in private Christian education far outpace their counterparts in public schools. It is reported that all homeschool students applying at Harvard last year were accepted.[1] On the other hand, public schools continue to deteriorate- academically, morally and in safety. The number of shootings and killings in public schools last year, even by little boys, have shaken our nation into disbelief. We keep asking, Why? The answers are as var ...
    Related: borrowed, ethics, social issues, ideal government, romanticism
  • Brown Vs The Board Of Education - 1,452 words
    Brown Vs. The Board Of Education Education has long been regarded as a valuable asset for all of America's youth. Yet, when this benefit is denied to a specific group, measures must be taken to protect its educational right. In the 1950's, a courageous group of activists launched a legal attack on segregation in schools. At the head of this attack was NAACP attorney Thurgood Marshall; his legal strategies would contribute greatly to the dissolution of educational segregation. According to U.S. Court Cases the segregation among whites and blacks was a legal law established for almost sixty years in the United States. However, Brown vs. The Board of Education was the turning point in race rela ...
    Related: american education, brown, brown v board of education, public education, third grade
  • Cultural Shock - 803 words
    Cultural Shock The day was finally here. It was November 11, 1990, the day that our family was to go to Land Of Liberty. I heard so many different things about this country called United States of America and I was warned that it would be nothing youve expected. The plane ride did not seem as long as it was; partly because I was lost in my own thoughts with hopes and anxiety. I thought about what I will become in this massive country I was headed and how soon I will adapt to this new culture and people. Every bits of hope I had faded as we drove to our new house after the plane landed. All I saw was open space and emptiness; something I did not expect or was prepared for. I lived in urban pa ...
    Related: cultural difference, shock, open space, math problem, creative
  • Democracy In America - 1,107 words
    ... s rampant and no one seems to care if justice or punishment is served or not. Many are very disillusioned with the government and think it is easier to do nothing than to become involved and try to change it. This is in direct relation to de Tocquevilles notion that democracies have a tendency to lose liberty and personal interest as the country grows larger. Not only with more people are there bound to be more differing ideas, but more people who share them, creating more voiced dissonance in the political sphere. This dissonance is glossed over when still in the minority. "[T]he tyranny of the majority" is one of de Tocquevilles main concerns with democratic nations. When a government ...
    Related: america, century america, democracy, democracy in america, first century
  • Education And Egalitarianism In America - 2,350 words
    ... methods of the 1880s and 1890s. The new methods, combined with the physical organization of the school, represented the direct opposite of Pestalozzi's belief that the child's innate powers should be allowed to develop naturally. Rather, the child must be lopped off or stretched to fit the procrustean curriculum. Subjects were graded according to difficulty, assigned to certain years, and taught by a rigid daily timetable. The amount of information that the child had absorbed through drill and memorization was determined by how much could be extracted from him by examinations. Reward or punishment came in the form of grades. At the end of the 19th century the methods of presenting inform ...
    Related: america, american education, education system, egalitarianism, measuring intelligence
  • Education In The 1800s - 1,306 words
    Education In The 1800'S Education had an emphasis on many different aspects during the time prior to the Civil War. There was a certain irony that set the mode of this time making things that were said irrelevant to the actions that were taken. The paradoxes of education in Pre civil war America, are evidenced in subject matter, gender, class and race, as well as purpose. American education developed from European intellectual traditions and institutions transplanted to the new world and modified by contact among different colonial groups and between new settlers and indigenous peoples. The English majority had the most influence on education. In New England, also including the 13 colonies, ...
    Related: american education, different aspects, american women, 13 colonies, necessity
  • Education In The 1800s - 1,238 words
    ... ake us love and esteem them, to educate us when young, and to take care of us when grown up, to advise, to counsel us, to render our lives easy and agreeable; these are the duties of women at all times.(Hunt 77) During the Civil War, schooling was disrupted for many whites, and many schools, especially in the south, were destroyed. (Cremin 316) During the first half of the nineteenth century, the percentage of while children enrolled in school increased dramatically. The practice spread throughout the Midwest, and public schooling existed in the south, but only until the end of the nineteenth century. Aggregate national school enrollment rates for whites between the age of five and ninet ...
    Related: american education, moral education, philosophy of education, public education, public schooling
  • Educational Philosophy - 761 words
    Educational Philosophy Throughout the years the topic of an American public education has been a very controversial subject. Since the time of the early Massachusetts Bay Colony, many have been divided on the role, if any, the government should play in educating America's children. There has also been debate on the type of education American children, and teachers should have. Although, there has been tremendous progress in creating an "ideal public education", there is still an ever-evolving need for change in America's public educational system. This paper strives to focus on this matter. First, it will look at the history of American education, beginning with colonial America to the prese ...
    Related: educational, educational philosophy, educational system, philosophy, philosophy of education
  • Experiencing Immigration - 1,478 words
    ... ed to practice Jewish religion, many cities erected synagogues and other houses of worship. On New York's East Side alone, 500 Jewish houses of worship were built between 1880 and 1915. (American Identity Explorer, CD-ROM) The Educational Alliance was formed to aid in the transition by offering citizenship classes to adults, cooking and sewing classes, and facilities for young Jewish children. Its aim was to "Americanize and modernize the newcomers and aid in their adjustment. (American Identity Explorer, CD-ROM) Other groups similar to the Alliance included the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (H.I.A.S), The Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society, and the Hebrew Free Loan Society. (American Ide ...
    Related: experiencing, immigration, living conditions, east european, wages
  • Fs For Society Or For Students - 878 words
    Fs For Society or For Students? The American education system has been taking some serious hits recently. In an article entitled "What Our Education System Needs Is More Fs," Carl Singleton suggests that students are merely attending class, but do not complete an acceptable level of learning. Teaching levels are of low quality and impersonal in nature with an emphasis on passing the students from their classroom to the next without ensuring their level of learning meets the minimum requirements. By a widespread issuing of Fs, we as a society must look at the cause and effect aspect this will produce. Giving Fs will not solve the problems Singleton suggests, but create new ones. Society must ...
    Related: self esteem, educational system, report card, television, involvement
  • Fs For Society Or For Students - 878 words
    Fs For Society or For Students? The American education system has been taking some serious hits recently. In an article entitled What Our Education System Needs Is More Fs, Carl Singleton suggests that students are merely attending class, but do not complete an acceptable level of learning. Teaching levels are of low quality and impersonal in nature with an emphasis on passing the students from their classroom to the next without ensuring their level of learning meets the minimum requirements. By a widespread issuing of Fs, we as a society must look at the cause and effect aspect this will produce. Giving Fs will not solve the problems Singleton suggests, but create new ones. Society must be ...
    Related: single parent, parent involvement, grade level, card, embarrassment
  • Government And School - 1,069 words
    Government And School School choice will improve education in America. Public schools are grossly inefficient, and are not educating many of America's youths adequately. Schools that are run independent from local government bureaucracy provide better education at lower cost. School choice would allow more students to attend better schools. School choice is a potent educational reform that is far more effective than increased spending. The fears of opponents of school choice are factually unfounded. School choice is necessary to improve American education. Through allowing more parental choice in education, school choice forces education into a free market environment. As it is now, parents ...
    Related: city school, government bureaucracy, high school, local government, public school, school choice, school district
  • History Of Education In America - 1,279 words
    History of Education in America As far back as the beginning of our nation, early leaders emphasized the importance of education and provided funds to create education for children from every background in our country. Thomas Jefferson said, Above all things, I hope the education of the common people will be extended to; convinced that on this good sense we may rely with the most security for the preservation of a due degree of liberty. He knew the importance of education (Jennings, 1996). In early America, there was concern for the common good and well being for all citizens in the known United States. John Dewey, the well known educator and philosopher, once said, What the best and wisest ...
    Related: america, american education, childhood education, early america, education programs, education reform, education today
  • Immigrants - 1,601 words
    Immigrants Should the United States take on more immigrants? Is the United States hurting from immigration problems? These issues have been debated on for generation. "According to the Immigration and Naturalization Service, approximately 300,000 illegal immigrants enter the United States annually" (Cozic 12). This large number of immigrants causes many different emotions. For some Americans, immigration is an adversity. Many Americans past and present have reacted to immigrants with fear: fear of unemployment and lower standards of living, fear of different religions and races, fear that immigration is spoiling the U.S. for those already here. The issues of immigration has three important t ...
    Related: naturalization service, demand curve, constitutional right, legalizing, environmental
  • Japan: A Changing Society - 1,027 words
    Japan: A Changing Society Japan, as a nation, is a continually changing society. Ever since western nations became involved with Japan, it's changes over recent times have increased at a substantial rate. Japan now faces cultural, economical and social differences as a result of the western involvement. The involvement was initiated by the Japanese themselves, beginning during the Meiji Period1 through current times. As time increases, Japan is slowly becoming more 'westernized' because of western involvement. Western involvement is greatly affecting Japan. Western involvement began in Japan during the late 1800's. The Meiji dynasty helped to carry it through, seeing the importance of wester ...
    Related: changing society, harvard university, american education, english language, harvard
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