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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: english literature

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  • Chaucer - 1,706 words
    ... rence Seitz Mitchum English 12 CP April 13, 2000 Geoffrey Chaucer: The Beginning of English Literature Geoffrey Chaucer's world was the Europe of the fourteenth century. It was not rich or poor, happy or sad. Rather, it was the intermingling of these, a mixture of splendor and poverty , displaying both worldly desire and spiritual purity. Chaucer's literary works broke away from conformity and set the stage for the beginning of English literature. His travels through it, mostly on the King's business, or civil service, shaped his writing, offering the readers of today a brief glimpse into the world in which he lived. Chaucer lived from approximately 1340 to 1400. The world in which he li ...
    Related: chaucer, geoffrey chaucer, political power, london bridge, waste
  • Christian Elements In Beowulf - 1,091 words
    Christian Elements In Beowulf Christian Elements in Beowulf The praised epic poem, Beowulf, is the first great heroic poem in English literature. The epic follows a courageous warrior named Beowulf throughout his young, adult life and into his old age. As a young man, Beowulf becomes a legendary hero when he saves the land of the Danes from the hellish creatures, Grendel and his mother. Later, after fifty years pass, Beowulf is an old man and a great king of the Geats. A monstrous dragon soon invades his peaceful kingdom and he defends his people courageously, dying in the process. His body is burned and his ashes are placed in a cave by the sea. By placing his ashes in the seaside cave, peo ...
    Related: beowulf, christian, christian elements, christian tradition, king beowulf
  • Christian Elements In Beowulf - 1,052 words
    ... n the mere, just as any rational soul would prefer death to eternal damnation. Beowulfs last monstrous foe is designated by the word wyrm meaning a serpent or worm, and the word draca meaning dragon. In the Old English poetry, the worm and dragon represent enmity to mankind. The worms who devour mans corpse after death, the dragons and serpents who receive his soul in hell, and the dragon of sin and mortality who rules over earth until Christ cancels for all time the work of the tempest. The Grendel kin and the dragon share some of the descriptive words and epithets used for monsters in the poem such as slayer, enemy, and evil destroyer. They all live in demonic halls. Some poets believe ...
    Related: beowulf, christian, christian elements, old english, medieval literature
  • Civil War - 3,726 words
    Civil War Before the civil war that tore the fabric of American life, there were three sections of American people with different economic, cultural and political attitudes. The balance of power was kept by different alliances, which came up in the pre-civil war period. The west was the balancing power and it was its shift that decided the course of American history. While it was allied with the south for economic reasons, a delicate balance was maintained. The minute the west allied with the north, the shift resulted in irreconcilable differences and led to war. The boundaries of the sections were very fluid but the basic sections in the 1840s-1860s were the north, which included New Englan ...
    Related: civil war, more important, southern white, american life, minnesota
  • Colonization In The Theme Of Conrads Heart Of Darkness And Swifts A Modest Proposal - 1,856 words
    Colonization In The Theme Of Conrads Heart Of Darkness And Swift's A Modest Proposal Joseph Riley McCormack Professor Alan Somerset English 020 Section 007 Submission Date: March 22, 2000 Colonization in the Theme of A Modest Proposal and Heart of Darkness Starting at the beginning of the seventeenth century, European countries began exploring and colonizing many different areas of the world. The last half of the nineteenth century saw the height of European colonial power around the globe. France, Belgium, Germany, and especially Great Britain, controlled over half the world. Along with this achievement came a notable sense of pride and confident belief that European civilization was the be ...
    Related: colonization, darkness, heart of darkness, jonathan swift, joseph conrad, modest, modest proposal
  • David - 1,151 words
    ... tling her to a standstill. The great Olympic gladiatorial contest took place in a barn loft. Earle went into battle expecting at least minimal co-operation from Beatrice. She had other ideas, and struggled against him like fury. The idea of her brothers standing watching made her fight all the harder, but at last her shoulders were pinned to the hay-covered floor." Great," said the twins in unison, "now kiss her." But Beatrice wouldn't co-operate in that either, and renewed the battle with even greater fury. Thus ended the first romance. The first job was at the Bank of Commerce in Creston when Birney was 16, wages $15 a week. He was a "promising young man" when the bank transferred him ...
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  • Death In The Dream Of The Rood - 1,506 words
    Death In The Dream Of The Rood The crucifixion of Christ is treated differently within the bodies of Old English and Middle English literature. The values of each era's society are superimposed on the descriptions of the sacrifice of Christ on the cross. Christ is depicted either as the model of the hero, prevalent in Old English literature, or as the embodiment of love and passion, as found in Showings by Julian of Norwich. Old English literature establishes the elements of the heroic code, to which its society ascribed. A man must live, or die, by his honor. In The Dream of the Rood the crucifixion of Christ is depicted as the ultimate symbol of heroism, as all mankind bewailed Christ's de ...
    Related: dream, rood, norton anthology, english literature, beowulf
  • Dickinson Vs Whitman - 629 words
    Dickinson Vs Whitman Two Poets, Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson are probably two of the most influential people in American poetry. They are regarded as the founders modern American poetry. Walt Whitman (1819-1892), for the time was breaking new ground with his diverse, energetic verse with regards to subject matter, form and style whether talking about overlooked objects in nature such as a single blade of grass or even our own hearing. Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) while living a life of seclusion, never really leaving her birthplace, was very adventurous internally. She was well read in English literature, often deeply exploring her own thoughts. While Dickinson and Whitman are referred to ...
    Related: dickinson, emily dickinson, walt whitman, whitman, american poetry
  • Dylan Thomas And Death Shall Have No Dominion - 1,055 words
    Dylan Thomas - And Death Shall Have No Dominion The Author and His Times When, in 1939, W. H. Auden and Christopher Isherwood set sail for the United States, the so-called 'All the fun' age ended. Auden's generation of poets' expectations came to nothing after the end of the Spanish Civil War, and they, disillusioned, left the European continent for good. In the late 1930s the school of Surrealism reached England, and Dylan Thomas was one of the few British authors of the time who were followers of this new trend in the arts. He shared the Surrealist interest in the great abstracts of Love and Death, and composed most of his work according to the rules of Surrealism. His first two volumes, E ...
    Related: dominion, dylan, dylan thomas, english literature, central theme
  • Dylan Thomas Companion - 1,036 words
    Dylan Thomas Companion Auden and Christopher Isherwood set sail for the United States, the so-called 'All the fun' age ended. Auden's generation of poets' expectations came to nothing after the end of the Spanish Civil War, and they, disillusioned, left the European continent for good. In the late 1930s the school of Surrealism reached England, and Dylan Thomas was one of the few British authors of the time who were followers of this new trend in the arts. He shared the Surrealist interest in the great abstracts of Love and Death, and composed most of his work according to the rules of Surrealism. His first two volumes, Eighteen Poems and Twenty-five Poems were published in the middle of the ...
    Related: companion, dylan, dylan thomas, w. h. auden, spanish civil war
  • Dylan Thomas The Life And Work - 622 words
    Dylan Thomas The Life And Work Dylan Thomas The Life and Work One: I am a Welshman; two: I am a drunkard; three: I am a lover of the human race, especially of women. A quote by one of the best-known British poets of the mid-20th century, he is remembered for his highly original, obscure poems, his amusing prose tales and plays, and his turbulent, well-publicized personal life. His name, Dylan Thomas. Dylan Marlais Thomas was born on October 27, 1914 in Swansea, Glamorganshire (Wales). He was educated at Swansea Grammar School and spent most of his childhood writing poetry and bunking school. His father was the senior English Literature Master at Dylan's school, but not even his father could ...
    Related: dylan, dylan thomas, south wales, merchant of venice, manuscript
  • Earnest Hemingways Books - 1,449 words
    Earnest Hemingway's Books Earnest Hemingway's Books Many of Ernest Hemingway's books have had different meaning and all could be interpreted in different way, but there has never been so much written about his other stories. Well the Old Man and the Sea had more written about it than any of his other novels and there have never been so many different types of interpretations about his other novels. The Old Man and the Sea is a book in which can be interpreted in many different ways. Here you will read what many critics have composed about the story of a great writer, Ernest Hemingway. Many of the critics have the same outlook on the works of Hemingway. Hemingway's work The Old man and the Se ...
    Related: earnest, ernest hemingway, new jersey, different ways, gutierrez
  • England Latin Anglia, Political Division Of The Island Of Great Britain, Constituting, With Wales, The Principal Division Of - 4,616 words
    England (Latin Anglia), political division of the island of Great Britain, constituting, with Wales, the principal division of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. England occupies all of the island east of Wales and south of Scotland, another division of the United Kingdom. Established as an independent monarchy many centuries ago, England in time achieved political control over the rest of the island, all the British Isles, and vast sections of the world, becoming the nucleus of one of the greatest empires in history. The capital, largest city, and chief port of England is London, with a population (1991 preliminary) of 6,378,600. It is also the capital of Great Britai ...
    Related: church of england, division, great britain, latin, principal, southern england
  • English - 1,044 words
    English Review of Shakespear's "The Tempest" Why is it that people fawn Shakespeare and have unreasonably high reguard for his works, including The Tempest, and label them as"immortal classics"? Indeed Shakespeares works had great significance in the evolution of English literature, but these works, including The Tempest are mostly devoid of significance and literary value in the present day. One can expect to gain little educational benefit of the english language or hightened apreciation for fine literature from the reading of Shakespeares titles for reasons enumerate. First of all, the colorful and sophisticated metephoric vernacular style of the language utilized is archaic; even the spe ...
    Related: english language, english literature, modern english, literary device, twentieth century
  • Eve Of St Anges - 1,657 words
    Eve Of St. Anges Someone once said that true love is only an illusion and can never be achieved. This is evidently shown through many elements of the poem by John Keats, "The Eve of St. Agnes." Much of this poem is about the imagination and how it can blind people and make them oblivious to the true events that are occurring. We the readers can see this very easily through the portrayal of one of the main characters Madeline. The second main character Porphyro tries to authenticate her quest for a dream experience however ends up taking advantage of her while she thinks she is still dreaming. The poem does endorse how the power of Madelines visionary imagination can influence her and the oth ...
    Related: belle dame, twentieth century, norton anthology, clue, wool
  • For Whom The Bell Tolls - 1,764 words
    For Whom The Bell Tolls When reading an Ernest Hemingway novel, one must try very hard to focus on the joy and encouragement found in the work. For Whom the Bell Tolls is full of love and beauty, but is so greatly overshadowed by this lingering feeling of doom--a feeling that does not let you enjoy reading, for you are always waiting for the let down, a chance for human nature to go horribly awry. This feeling is broken up into three specific areas. In Ernest Hemingway's novel, For Whom the Bell Tolls, humanity is exploited through brutal violence, unnecessary courage, and hopeless futility. Hemingway has the uncanny gift of imagery, and he possesses a brilliant mastery of the English langua ...
    Related: bell, bell tolls, for whom the bell tolls, modern literature, dark side
  • Ford Essay - 1,687 words
    Ford Essay The Good Soldier, utilises a variety of literary techniques to construct meaning and propel imaginative power. Ford uses figurative language to initiate the polarity of "Convention and Passion"(1) and a divergent narrative style and structure to present cultural issues such as the quest for human knowledge and the imprisonment of society. "The long afternoon wore on" commences in the context of Nancy's revelations. She has read the account of the Brand divorce case in the newspapers and is apprehending the manifestations of recently discovered phenomena. Ford employs a vocabulary that is mournful and dull to conjure up images of shadow and anguish. He uses words like "frightened," ...
    Related: ford, point of view, the narrator, literary techniques, diary
  • Frankenstein: A Model Of English Romanticism - 1,511 words
    Frankenstein: A Model Of English Romanticism Frankenstein: A Model of English Romanticism The literary world embraced English romanticism when it began to emerge and was so taken by its elements that it is still a beloved experience for the reader of today. Romanticism has crossed all social boundaries, and it was during the seventeenth and eighteenth century, it found its way into almost every niche in the literary world (Lowy 76). From the beginning of its actuality, romanticism has forged its way through many eras including the civil war (Hall 44). Literature such as the famous Gone With The Wind was a good example of romanticism in that era because it had many of the required qualities b ...
    Related: english literature, english romantic, romanticism, common theme, works cited
  • Gawain And Green Knight - 1,355 words
    ... picking his target and moving in on it knowing he had the upper hand. Gawain and the lady are know starting to have a more intimate relationship and the two even exchange a kiss in their next encounter. However, the next move for the lady is to propose that she and Gawain have an affair. Gawain answers this in a clever manner saying that he can not have an affair with a woman of the court, despite all the affection that he has shown her during his visit. As a result of this, the lady gives him a green girdle, which belongs to her husband, and instructs him to wear it and it will keep him from harm during the upcoming meeting with the Green Knight. "She gave him the belt, and besought him ...
    Related: gawain, green knight, knight, sir gawain and the green knight, literary criticism
  • Geoffrey Chaucer - 1,713 words
    Geoffrey Chaucer annon ...I think some of Chaucer belongs to his time and that much of that time is dead, extinct, and never to be made alive again. What was alive in it, lives through him... --John Masefield Geoffrey Chaucers world was the Europe of the fourteenth century. It was neither rich or poor, happy nor sad. Rather, it was the intermingling of these, a mixture of splendor and poverty, displaying both worldly desire and spiritual purity. Chaucers travels through it, mostly on the Kings business, or civil service, shaped his writing, offering the readers of today a brief glimpse into the world in which he lived. Chaucer lived from approximately AD 1340 to 1400. The world in which he l ...
    Related: chaucer, geoffrey, geoffrey chaucer, hundred years' war, royal court
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