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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: encrypted

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  • A Look At Public Key Encryption - 1,210 words
    A Look at Public Key Encryption Encryption is the process of disguising information by transforming plain text into gibberish, or ciphertext, which cannot be understood by an unauthorized person. Decryption is the process of transforming ciphertext back into plaintext that can be read by anyone. Example of encryption can be found in history, for example in the era of the Cold War, the Solviet Union and the United States would send electronic messages to one military point to another, encrypted. If the enemy intercepted the message, they would have to crack this message to get the information. Typically when governments used encryption they used a very complex method of encrypting messages. E ...
    Related: data encryption, encryption, national security, major problem, essence
  • Are You Protected - 522 words
    Are you Protected? In this day and age, computers have become a common necessity of everyday life. Anyone who has not joined in this new era of technology will soon be left in the dark ages. Along with the computer advancement has come the Internet, which is an intricate connection of millions of computers around the world. The Internet has become today's form of communication, totally reinventing the mail system, telephones and even business meetings. With these great new advantages come many serious new problems that concern anyone that communicates through it. Those that are connected to it are in essence a community of their own, an online community. When people communicate with each oth ...
    Related: real world, credit card, physical barriers, intercept, link
  • Boundaries Of Ownership - 2,946 words
    ... Court decision in an earlier case. Blackmun, treading carefully along a fine line between the different kinds of rights accorded to different kinds of owners, stresses that infringement of copyright does not easily equate with theft, conversion or fraud. . . . The infringer invades a statutorily defined province guaranteed to the copyright holder alone. But he does not assume physical control over the copyright; nor does he wholly deprive its owner of its use. While one may colloquially liken infringement with some general notion of wrongful appropriation, infringement plainly implicates a more complex set of property interests than does run-of-the-mill theft, conversion or fraud. Howeve ...
    Related: ownership, technological tools, more important, personal financial, tech
  • Computer Crime - 1,379 words
    Computer Crime Computer Crime Billions of dollars in losses have already been discovered. Billions more have gone undetected. Trillions will be stolen, most without detection, by the emerging master criminal of the twenty-first century--the computer crime offender. Worst of all, anyone who is computer literate can become a computer criminal. He or she is everyman, everywoman, or even everychild. The crime itself will often be virtual in nature--sometimes recorded, more often not--occurring only on the Internet, with the only record being electronic impulses. Before discussing Internet crimes, we can expect to see in the years ahead, let's look at the good news: The most-dreaded types of offe ...
    Related: computer crime, computer software, computer systems, computer virus, crime
  • Computer Science Government Intervention Of The Internet During The Past Decade, Our Society Has Become Based Solely On The A - 1,514 words
    ... ns of encoding data so that only someone with the proper "key" can decode it. "Why do you need PGP (encryption)? It's personal. It's private. And it's no one's business but yours. You may be planning a political campaign, discussing our taxes, or having an illicit affair. Or you may be doing something that you feel shouldn't be illegal, but is. Whatever it is, you don't want your private electronic mail (E-mail) or confidential documents read by anyone else. There's nothing wrong with asserting your privacy. Privacy is as apple-pie as the Constitution. Perhaps you think your E-mail is legitimate enough that encryption is unwarranted. If you really are a law-abiding citizen with nothing t ...
    Related: computer science, government intervention, intervention, science, solely, u.s. government
  • Computer Viruses - 1,755 words
    Computer Viruses In the past decade, computer and networking technology has seen enormous growth. This growth however, has not come without a price. With the advent of the "Information Highway", as its coined, a new methodology in crime has been created. Electronic crime has been responsible for some of the most financially devastating victimizations in society. In the recent past, society has seen malicious editing of the Justice Department web page (1), unauthorized access into classified government computer files, phone card and credit card fraud, and electronic embezzlement. All these crimes are committed in the name of "free speech." These new breed of criminals claim that information s ...
    Related: computer crime, computer networks, computer program, computer systems, computer virus, computer viruses, personal computer
  • Control Of Internet - 1,523 words
    ... the proper "key" can decode it. "Why do you need" encryption? "It's personal. It's private. And it's no one's business but yours" (Laberis). You may be planning a political campaign, discussing our taxes, or having an illicit affair. Or you may be doing something that you feel shouldn't be illegal, but it is. Whatever it is, you don't want your private electronic mail or confidential documents read by anyone else. There's nothing wrong with asserting your privacy. Perhaps you are not really concerned about encrypting your e-mail because you believe that you have nothing to hide. I mean you havent broken the law in any way, right? Well then why not just write letters on postcards instead ...
    Related: online available, data encryption, the intended, bystander, decoding
  • Cryptography Is The Science Of Encoding A Message Into A Form That Is Unreadable And Making Sure Only The Proper People Are C - 1,338 words
    Cryptography is the science of encoding a message into a form that is unreadable and making sure only the proper people are capable of decoding the message back into its original form. This is usually done by using an encryption algorithm and a decryption algorithm (these two are often the same) and very often a secret key. Some of the early cryptographic systems did not use a key but instead kept the algorithm itself secret. The message sender uses the encryption algorithm and the key to encode the message, and then sends it to the receiver. The receiver then uses the decryption algorithm and the key to turn back the encrypted message into its original form and read it. If the message is in ...
    Related: cryptography, encoding, science, ancient greece, native americans
  • Delving Into Computer Crime - 1,113 words
    Delving Into Computer Crime White-collar crime, specifically computer crime, is becoming more popular as computers become more readily available. Crimes using computers and crimes against computers are usually committed without fear of being caught, due to the detachment of the offender from the victim. Computer crime is defined as, "Criminal activity directly related to the use of computers, specifically illegal trespass into the computer system or database of another, manipulation or theft of stored or on-line data, or sabotage of equipment and data."(1). This includes both crimes using computers and crimes against computers. The people who commit these crimes are of a wide variety. Cyber- ...
    Related: collar crime, computer crime, computer networks, computer program, computer system, computer systems, computer technology
  • Did W Shakespeare Really Exist - 1,653 words
    Did W. Shakespeare Really Exist? Sept. 12, 2000 It is part of every person's education to be taught that William Shakespeare is one of the greatest writers of all time. Shakespeare was a man who began life from in modest family, with virtually no education early on, in the16th century town of Stratford-upon-Avon, England, and who later wrote plays and poetry that were to win praise throughout the world. It is an inherited belief that has been passed own from generation to generation. With the increase in learning of the present day, and a growth of research opportunities, more and more people have become dissatisfied with this inherited teaching. Substantial inconsistencies and illogicalitie ...
    Related: shakespeare, william shakespeare, holy trinity, explaining, candidate
  • Distributed Computing - 1,360 words
    Distributed Computing As the technology we use today increases in speed and usability, there are those that are happy with the fastest computer. But then there are those that either want or need to go faster than the fastest. The solution lies in and around the Internet, the solution has been rightfully termed "Distributed Computing." Put simply, distributed computing is the splitting of a task among multiple computers. Hence using the power of many computers that people already have, thus sparing the cost of buying a supercomputer of equal proportions, which in some cases is impossible. Distributed Computing isn't all that hard of a concept to grasp. The first thing that would be done when ...
    Related: computing, distributed, computer science, technology advances, sitting
  • Ecommerce - 1,187 words
    ... l environment. People expect to get a real person when they send mail. This can work to your advantage as a small start-up company, or when you are a large corporation. No matter what business you are involved in, an online-help feature is an extraordinary advantage to have. A potential source of trouble is customer concerns with privacy and security. Anything sent over the Internet is sent through several different computers before it reaches its destination. The concern regarding Internet security and privacy is that unscrupulous hackers can capture credit card or checking account data as it is transferred or break into computers that hold the same information. Security on the Internet ...
    Related: ecommerce, information security, internet protocol, internet security, on-line
  • Electronic Commerce - 1,165 words
    ... tion key can gain access to your information. Microsoft Internet Explorer and Netscape come standard with 40-bit encryption. With your data encrypted, even with a 40-bit encryption, it is safer to transmit that data around the world than to call in your number over the telephone. When you are talking about online banking, you most likely will have to upgrade your browser to support 128-bit encryption. The majority of online banking companies will not let you use the basic 40-bit encryption because it is not quite as safe as the 128-bit version. It is assumed that you need more protection for your bank accounts than you do for a basic online purchase. In all cases you should be using some ...
    Related: commerce, electronic commerce, savings account, technical support, mart
  • Encryption - 713 words
    Encryption The electronic age has brought forth many technological advances. With these advances came the need for security and tighter control on how we send information electronically over the Internet or through a network. Date encryption is, in its simplest terms, the translation of data into a secret code. In order to read an encrypted file, the receiver of the file must obtain a secret key that will enable him to decrypt the file. A deeper look into cryptography, cryptanalysis, and the Data Encryption Standard (DES) will provide a better understanding of date encryption. Cryptographic Methods There are two standard methods of cryptography, asymmetric encryption and symmetric encryption ...
    Related: data encryption, encryption, u.s. government, national institute, communications
  • Espionage In Wwii - 1,106 words
    Espionage In Wwii Many of us can remember playing childhood games when we were younger. One of my personal favorites was hide and seek. My favorite part of the game was when I was hiding and tried to watch where the seeker looked while he or she searched. Of course I could have been caught, but it wasn't a big deal at the time. What would happen though if the seeker didn't know who he was looking for, but knew someone was hiding? How would he go about finding the person? Further more how much more could the person accomplish if they were hiding right in front of them, but the seeker did not know? Well it may sound a little off, but that was basically the game of espionage. Spies would try to ...
    Related: espionage, wwii, world war i, north africa, vital
  • Government And Internet - 1,510 words
    ... ta so that only someone with the proper "key" can decode it. "Why do you need PGP (encryption)? It's personal. It's private. And it's no one's business but yours. You may be planning a political campaign, discussing our taxes, or having an illicit affair. Or you may be doing something that you feel shouldn't be illegal, but is. Whatever it is, you don't want your private electronic mail (E-mail) or confidential documents read by anyone else. There's nothing wrong with asserting your privacy. Privacy is as apple-pie as the Constitution. Perhaps you think your E-mail is legitimate enough that encryption is unwarranted. If you really are a law-abiding citizen with nothing to hide, then why ...
    Related: u.s. government, electronic mail, mass communication, data encryption, enclosed
  • Government Intervention Of The Internet - 1,517 words
    ... ion is a means of encoding data so that only someone with the proper"key" can decode it. "Why do you need PGP (encryption)? It's personal. It's private. And it's no one's business but yours. You may be planning a political campaign, discussing our taxes, or having an illicit affair. Or you may be doing something that you feel shouldn't be illegal, but is. Whatever it is, you don't want your private electronic mail (E-mail) or confidential documents read by anyone else. There's nothing wrong with asserting your privacy. Privacy is as apple-pie as the Constitution. Perhaps you think your E-mail is legitimate enough that encryption is unwarranted. If you really are a law-abiding citizen wit ...
    Related: government intervention, intervention, u.s. government, digital age, political organizations
  • Government Intervention Of The Internet - 1,512 words
    ... oding data so that only someone with the proper "key" can decode it. "Why do you need PGP (encryption)? It's personal. It's private. And it's no one's business but yours. You may be planning a political campaign, discussing our taxes, or having an illicit affair. Or you may be doing something that you feel shouldn't be illegal, but is. Whatever it is, you don't want your private electronic mail (E-mail) or confidential documents read by anyone else. There's nothing wrong with asserting your privacy. Privacy is as apple-pie as the Constitution. Perhaps you think your E-mail is legitimate enough that encryption is unwarranted. If you really are a law-abiding citizen with nothing to hide, t ...
    Related: government intervention, intervention, u.s. government, mass communication, in another country
  • Government Intervention Of The Internet - 1,512 words
    ... oding data so that only someone with the proper "key" can decode it. "Why do you need PGP (encryption)? It's personal. It's private. And it's no one's business but yours. You may be planning a political campaign, discussing our taxes, or having an illicit affair. Or you may be doing something that you feel shouldn't be illegal, but is. Whatever it is, you don't want your private electronic mail (E-mail) or confidential documents read by anyone else. There's nothing wrong with asserting your privacy. Privacy is as apple-pie as the Constitution. Perhaps you think your E-mail is legitimate enough that encryption is unwarranted. If you really are a law-abiding citizen with nothing to hide, t ...
    Related: government intervention, intervention, u.s. government, world wide, digital age
  • Government Intervention Of The Internet - 1,517 words
    ... Encryption is a means of encoding data so that only someone with the proper "key" can decode it. "Why do you need PGP (encryption)? It's personal. It's private. And it's no one's business but yours. You may be planning a political campaign, discussing our taxes, or having an illicit affair. Or you may be doing something that you feel shouldn't be illegal, but is. Whatever it is, you don't want your private electronic mail (E-mail) or confidential documents read by anyone else. There's nothing wrong with asserting your privacy. Privacy is as apple-pie as the Constitution. Perhaps you think your E-mail is legitimate enough that encryption is unwarranted. If you really are a law-abiding ci ...
    Related: government intervention, intervention, u.s. government, mass communication, political organizations
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