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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: encarta encyclopedia

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  • 1984 Vs Animal Farm - 1,262 words
    ... n with us. Animal Farm basically deals with how seeking totalitarian power can and will destroy any attempt at revolution and how power can corrupt even the most probable utopias. One night when Farmer Jones has gone to bed drunk, Old Major, the pig in charge of all, assembles all of the animals of Manor Farm to tell them of a dream he had concerning man's and animal's place in life. He points out how animals are literally worked to death by man, who consumes but does not produce, and thus must remove man by means of rebellion. Shortly thereafter, he dies and the animals begin preparation for this Revolution, whenever it may come. When the hungry animals attack and drive off Jones one da ...
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  • A Letter From Saudi Arabia - 1,402 words
    ... and an Arabic Muslim. When I say diversity, I basically mean the traditions, the way of practicing religion. I have come to realize the fact that Islam is practiced differently in all the different parts of the world, and the way I practiced it when I was in the US, is certainly quite different from what I have seen and practiced here. Then there are so many customs which actually have their root in the beliefs of Islam, which I was totally unaware of. For example everybody removes their shoes at the doorstep before entering the house, even when you are invited to someones home. Umar told me that it is a tradition that has been carried out for centuries now10. Speaking of traditions, in ...
    Related: arabia, saudi, saudi arabia, labor force, american dollar
  • Abortion Clinics Should Not Be Closed - 1,231 words
    Abortion Clinics Should Not Be Closed $115 Designer Cosmetic Collection From Cosmetique -- Only $1! Abortion Clinics Should Not Be Closed In 1973, the Supreme Courts decision made it possible for women to get safe, legal abortions from well-trained medical surgeons, and therefore led to dramatic decreases in pregnancy-related injury and death ("abortion"). Now there is a new proposal to close abortion clinics. This proposal takes away the privacy rights of American women that are guaranteed by our Constitution. By closing abortion clinics the government is not only taking away womens rights, but is also punishing those whom want to exercise their right of a pro-choice woman. Abortion clinics ...
    Related: abortion, privacy rights, another country, health care, pro-choice
  • Abortion Clinics Should Not Be Closed In The Us - 1,242 words
    Abortion Clinics Should Not be Closed in the U.S. Let American Consumer Counseling Help you Get Out of Debt! Abortion Clinics Should Not be Closed in the U.S. In 1973, the Supreme Courts decision made it possible for women to get safe, legal abortions from well-trained medical surgeons, and therefore led to dramatic decreases in pregnancy-related injury and death ("abortion"). Now there is a new proposal to close abortion clinics. This proposal takes away the privacy rights of American women that are guaranteed by our Constitution. By closing abortion clinics the government is not only taking away womens rights, but is also punishing those whom want to exercise their right of a pro-choice wo ...
    Related: abortion, rape victims, liberties union, american consumer, constitution
  • Abraham Maslow - 1,910 words
    Abraham Maslow ABRAHAM MASLOW Born April1,1908 Abraham Maslow was the oldest of seven children born to his parents in Brooklyn New York. Feeling pressure from his parents to achieve academic greatness, Abraham went through early childhood with few friends. Focusing mainly on his studies Maslow had a quiet and unfulfilling adolescence. Abraham started off his college career by attending city college in New York were he began to study law, as his father had wanted him to do. He soon lost interest and transferred to the University of Wisconsin and studied psychology. Here Maslow received, in 1934, his Ph.D. During his college career Abraham married his cousin Bertha Goodman, his parents did not ...
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  • Acoustics In Music - 655 words
    Acoustics In Music Acoustics in Music Through out the history of music, acoustics have played a major role. After all if it were not for acoustics the quality of sound that we know today would not exist. The word acoustics comes from the Greek word akouein, which means, "to hear"(Encarta Encyclopedia). Since music has to be heard in most cases for enjoyment, acoustics obviously take on a very important role in the pleasure that music brings to the ear. Acoustical architecture and design are two key elements in the way music sounds. For example, an electric guitar played in a concert hall would sound very different compared to the sound produced in a small room. These differences can be expla ...
    Related: acoustics, music, more important, opera house, architectural
  • Adolph Coors - 1,148 words
    Adolph Coors My Personal Interest: The Rise and Fall (Literally) of Adolph Coors Jodee Jost-Miranda GEN 101 Mr. Harvey September 27, 2000 Adolph Coors 2 My Personal Interest: The Rise and Fall (Literally) of Adolph Coors After already sharing my thoughts of my family, and myself, I felt as though neither of my favorite personal interests would accomplish the task at hand. It was Saturday afternoon, and I still didn't have a good personal interest topic to write about. I started mind-mapping, writing every topic I could think of, including: The Real Civil War; Mental Instability - Possession or Illness; Finding the Perfect Home - Mortgage and All; and even The lightning Capital: Why Here? The ...
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  • African American Community - 3,040 words
    ... stood that his name would not appear in the program credits or advertising. For twenty weeks, the Mahalia Jackson Show ran on television for a half-hour each episode. Beginning in September 1954, the show did not last very long. Mahalias show featured her singing traditional gospels and spirituals with a few miscellaneous songs but the show was missing a major component. (2) The show was in need of a sponsor and began to go out of business. The show went from thirty minutes airtime to ten minutes and eventually ended in February 1955. This was not the end of Mahalia's television appearances however. The TV station, WBBM-TV of Chicago asked Mahalia to be a guest on their program, "In Town ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, race relations
  • Alcoholism Is A Wideranging And Complex Disease That Heavily Plagues Society Drinking Is Defined As The Consumption Of A Liqu - 1,012 words
    ... igestive enzymes, which can irritate the stomach wall, producing heartburn, nausea, gastritis, and ulcers. The stomach of a chronic drinker loses the ability to adequately move food and expel it into the duodenum, leaving some food always in the stomach, causing sluggish digestion and vomiting. Alcohol may also inflame the small and large intestine (Overview 4). Moderate daily drinking may be good for the heart, but for many the risks outweigh the benefits. Even one binge may produce irregular heartbeats, and an alcohol abuser experience increased risk of high blood pressure, heart attacks, heart arrhythmia, and heart disease. Alcohol may cause cardiomyopathy (a disease of the heart musc ...
    Related: alcoholism, consumption, drinking, heart disease, heavily, legal drinking
  • Alzheimers - 435 words
    ALZHEIMER'S Brian Foster Health March 2, 1999 Alzheimer's disease was first described by Alois Alzheimer. Alois Alzheimer was a German psychiatrist and neuropathologist and he first described it in 1906. The disease was first thought to be a rare condition affecting only young people, and was referred to as presenite dementia. About 10 percent of the United States population over the age of 65 is affected by Alzheimer's disease, and up to 45 percent of those over the age of 85 may have the disease. Up to 2 million people suffer from it, or one percent of the population. During the early stages of the disease, a person forgets daily events, but they can still recall things that happened many ...
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  • Alzheimers Disease Is A Progressive Degenerative Disease Of The Brain That Causes Increasing Loss Of Memory And Other Mental - 564 words
    Alzheimers disease is a progressive degenerative disease of the brain that causes increasing loss of memory and other mental abilities. The disease attacks few people before age sixty, but it occurs in about twenty percent of people who live to age eighty-five. The disease is named after the German psychiatrist and neuropathologist Alois Alzheimer, who first described its effects on brain cells in 1907. Symptoms of Alzheimers disease come in three stages: early, late, and advanced. Early stages include forgetfulness of recent events, increasing difficulty in performing intellectual tasks such as accustomed work, balancing a checkbook or maintaining a household. Also, personality changes, inc ...
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  • Anthrax Vaccination Program - 1,394 words
    Anthrax Vaccination Program On May 18, 1998, Secretary of Defense William Cohen approved a plan to vaccinate all U.S. service members for anthrax. This plan has caused a fierce ethical debate over the legitimacy of this vaccination. The Department of Defense claims the vaccination is completely safe and has been in use for decades. Some doctors dispute this claim, and contend the vaccination may not be effective against weapon versions of anthrax. Many service members have refused the vaccination and have either separated or faced formal punishment for their decision. The Bioport Corporation of Lansing Michigan is the only company that produces the anthrax vaccine. According to a Phoenix Tim ...
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  • Binge Drinking - 677 words
    Binge Drinking My report is on the disease binge drinking. Binge drinking is a dangerous drinking problem that many people have. A binge is defined as five or more alcoholic drinks in one sitting for a man, and four for a woman. Binge drinking is extremely common among American high school and college students. In fact, one-third of high school and college students admit to a binge in the last 30 days. I think that this high rate is reasonable since drinking is still seen as a popular activity in many colleges as seen in the horrible accidents in the newspaper or on television. On television shows and in movies binge drinking is rarely shown as a dangerous and horrible thing. Alcohol is more ...
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  • Blood Is A Fluid Substance That Circulates In The Arteries And Veins Of The Body Blood Is Bright Red Or Scarlet When It Has B - 1,393 words
    Blood is a fluid substance that circulates in the arteries and veins of the body. Blood is bright red or scarlet when it has been oxygenated in the lungs and passes into the arteries; it becomes bluish red when it has given up its oxygen to nourish the tissues of the body and is returning to the lungs through the veins and the tiny vessels called capillaries. In the lungs, the blood gives up the carbon dioxide wastes it has taken from the tissues, receives a new supply of oxygen, and begins a new cycle. This movement of blood is brought about by the coordinate activity of the heart, lungs, and blood vessels. Blood is composed of a yellowish fluid, called plasma, in which are suspended the mi ...
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  • Buddhism Details - 905 words
    Buddhism Details The most devoted followers of the Buddha were organized into a sangha. Its members were identified by their shaved heads and robes made of un-sewn orange cloth. The early Buddhist monks, or bhikkus, wandered from place to place, settling down in communities only during the rainy season when travel was difficult. Theravadan monks and nuns were humble and obtained their food in the form of offering on a daily round of the homes of Lay devotees. Among the traditional functions of the Buddhist monks are the performance of funerals and memorial services in honor of the dead. Major elements of such services include the chanting of scripture and transfer of merit for the benefit of ...
    Related: buddhism, holy spirit, ten commandments, the bible, conscience
  • Burr Conspiracy - 1,173 words
    ... s now Princeton University. Burr joined the Continental Army in 1775, and rose to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. Burr was appointed attorney general of New York in 1789 and served as a United States senator from 1791 to 1797 (Onager CD-ROM). In the Election of 1800, Aaron Burr was the running mate of Republican candidate Thomas Jefferson. Although Burr was running for vice-president, he received as many votes as Jefferson did, and the House of Representatives chose Jefferson as president. After Burr's term as vice-president was over and he lost the race for the governorship of New York, Burr fought Alexander Hamilton in a duel in Weekawhen, New Jersey, on July 11,1804. Aaron Burr killed ...
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  • Cambridge University - 668 words
    Cambridge University England is famous for its educational institutes. It has some of the most famous universities of the world like Oxford, Cambridge and London universities. The city of Cambridge is in the county of Cambridgeshire and is famous because it is the home of Cambridge University, one of the oldest and most prestigious universities of the world. The Cambridge City occupies an area of 16 square miles. It is 50 miles north of London and stands on the East Bank of the River Cam, and was originally a place where the river was crossed. Other than being the home of Cambridge University, Cambridge City itself is a very lively city. It provides a lot of entertainment such as Ballet, Ope ...
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  • Cancer - 1,894 words
    ... Bibliography Of all the diseases and viruses that are known to man, no other can strike fear in so many peoples hearts, as the word cancer. What is cancer? Cancer is a new growth of tissue resulting from a continuous proliferation of abnormal cells that have the ability to invade and destroy other tissues.1 Cancer may be found in any type of cell or tissue in the human body. Cancer is not found in just humans, but also in animals and plants. Cancer cells can grow where ever normal cells grow or divide. Cancer is not one disease but many single diseases classified under one name.2 In our bodies we produce many thousands of new cells everyday. We produce these cell in order to grow until ...
    Related: american cancer, breast cancer, cancer, cancer research, cancer society, colon cancer, human cancer
  • Capital Punishment - 712 words
    Capital Punishment Capital Punishment Capital punishment is defined in the Encarta Encyclopedia as the legal infliction of the death penalty. The death penalty is currently used as punishment for crimes of murder. The State of Florida supports capital punishment and carries it out by electric chair execution. According to The Death Row Fact Sheet published by the Florida Department of Corrections, 44 people have been executed since 1976 and another 372 inmates are currently on death row in Florida. Thesis. Deterrence defined as. By the Encarta Encyclopedia. Under this concept, the individual committing the crime and society are prevented from committing this action again. In the case of the ...
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  • Capital Punishment: Is It Meeting Its Objectives - 1,358 words
    Capital Punishment: Is It Meeting Its Objectives Capital Punishment: Is it meeting its objectives? Is capital punishment meeting its objectives? Capital punishment is being applied to deter crimes that involve homicides and to punish the criminals who commit such crimes. Capital Punishment is not carrying out their intentions in a positive form. On the contrary, Capital Punishment is putting many criminals to rest in ways in which many consider to be an atrocity. Society understands that criminals have to be punished for their crimes, but should they be punished by such crucial means that occasionally give a negative impact to the public. This document will relate to, how the system of capit ...
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