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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: employee

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  • Effect Of Employee Assistance Programs - 1,570 words
    Effect Of Employee Assistance Programs The Effect of Employee Assistance Programs At the Workplace Throughout the business world, one of the largest problems individual businesses face is the use of illegal drugs and alcohol. These substances greatly affect the business and workplace environments for many individuals. Employee assistance programs were created to help deal with augmenting substance abuse problems. Employee assistance programs enable a companies and its workers to detect if a co-worker is having problems and aids in helping them to overcome their problems by giving them advice or suggesting counseling. Critics have noticed some problems with this program. One problem is the la ...
    Related: assistance, assistance program, employee, employee assistance program, early detection
  • Employee Attitudeorganizational Behavior - 1,967 words
    Employee Attitude/Organizational Behavior Introduction A happy worker makes for a good worker you say? Well, United Airlines had somewhat of an all for one employee attitude in July 1994. They announced the purchase of their own company for which they work for $5 billion through ESOP (Employee Stock Ownership Plan). So now, in the case of United Airlines, there obviously is a soar in employee productivity and spirits. Stocks have risen 120% due to this buyout (almost three times higher than the airline industry average gain). Every company or small business owner desires a positive employee attitude within his or her organization for high productivity and quality. United Airlines achieved th ...
    Related: employee, organizational behavior, leadership qualities, more practical, retain
  • Employee Benefits - 1,777 words
    Employee Benefits Rob Barr Benefits that will come with a job might not make you take the job just because of that. But It could have major influence over your decision. Flexible scheduling, paid time off, and child care were singled out as key programs that impress job candidates. (http://www.amcity.com/)3 Employee benefits are becoming a major part of what employees are looking for from their companies. And in return companies are looking at their benefit packages trying to trim benefits that are not benefiting anyone. Or basically trying to get the most for their buck without upsetting their employees. Benefits also can be a way to motivate employees into better enjoying their jobs. By em ...
    Related: employee, employee benefits, life insurance, health maintenance, vacation
  • Employee Benefits - 255 words
    Employee Benefits If you have employees, than salaries, wages & benefits are a large part of your monthly expenses. You want to make sure you are getting the most productivity for your money. When you have a problem with low employee motivation and/or productivity, it is important to search for the reason. Some may feel underpaid, another may want more recognition or interaction with other people. Simply raising your employee's pay or giving them a promotion may not be the answer. You can reduce unwanted employee turnover & related recruiting, hiring & training costs by shifting experienced employees. The key is to recognize the workers value & aspirations. Age, education, job experience, jo ...
    Related: employee, employee benefits, employee motivation, employee turnover, flexible benefits
  • Employee Benefits Required By Law - 3,418 words
    Employee Benefits Required by Law Employee Benefits Required by Law The legally required employee benefits constitute nearly a quarter of the benefits package that employers provide. These benefits include employer contributions to Social Security, unemployment insurance, and workers compensation insurance. Altogether such benefits represent about twenty-one and half percent of payroll costs. Social Security Social Security is the federally administered insurance system. Under current federal laws, both employer and employee must pay into the system, and a certain percentage of the employees salary is paid up to a maximum limit. Social Security is mandatory for employees and employers. The m ...
    Related: employee, employee benefits, security benefits, working women, federal government
  • Employee Benefits Required By Law - 3,223 words
    ... extended benefits. Domestic employees. Employers of domestic employees must pay State and Federal unemployment taxes if they cash wages to household workers totaling $1,000, or more, in any calendar quarter of the current or preceding year. A household worker is an employee who performs domestic services in a private home, local college club, or local fraternity or sorority chapter. Employers of agricultural employees must pay State and Federal unemployment taxes if: (1) they pay cash wages to employees of $20,000, or more, in any calendar quarter; or (2) in each of 20 different calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year, there was at least 1 day in which they had 10 or mor ...
    Related: employee, employee benefits, security benefits, federal emergency, veterans affairs
  • Employee Empowermet - 758 words
    Employee Empowermet Debate #2: Employee Empowerment is the Only Way The selected passage discusses the idea of teaching people to lead themselves in the work place, or empowering employees to make decisions that will affect the running of the organisation, and ultimately, their careers. The passage asserts that organisations function best when the top management holds paramount decision-making power because it focuses this power to the only body truly capable of making educated, goal-achieving decisions. This view stands open to much criticism. The article states that a specific organisational body must be given ultimate decision-making power so that important decisions cannot be passed off ...
    Related: employee, point of view, information source, effective teamwork, management
  • Employee Selection - 1,219 words
    Employee Selection Selection is increasingly important as more attention is paid to the costs of poor selection, and as reduced job mobility means that selection errors are likely to stay with the organization for longer. (Torrington and Hall, 1998, p221) The selection decision has always been important as the way for a company to obtain the human resource that is appropriate for the job and company. There are many methods for selection such as: testing, advertising, completing application form, screening, corresponding with the prospective employee. Among these, the two principal selection methods, which most are used, are application forms, and interviews. In fact, it is not just one selec ...
    Related: employee, selection, basic information, compare and contrast, attractiveness
  • Employee Selection - 1,219 words
    ... ection method. Therefore, the information provided by the application form is insufficient. The information provided by the application form needs to be further proved. There are at least two probabilities that will influence the reliability. One is whether all the information of the forms is true. Evidently, not all applicants are honest. It is possible that the information was magnified, omitted or even not existed. The other is whether the selector misunderstands the information of the form. Because the selection only based on the data without confirmed, then the selectors use some models or logic make some conclusions. It is probably to misunderstand. Application form cannot get feed ...
    Related: employee, employee training, selection, brief history, individual development
  • Hiring A New Employee - 655 words
    Hiring A New Employee Hiring a New Employee "A company is only as good as the employees who work for It." Seems to be the slogan driving most employers in today's marketplace. Your employees are a direct reflection of your company and in many industries, may actually be considered the product. Finding the right employee can be one of the most crucial and difficult decisions a business can face. Businesses must be prepared for this process and understand the steps involved in hiring a new employee. When an employer makes the decision to hire a new employee, they must first decide what advantages this employee will offer the company. The employee may be considered a producer, who would benefit ...
    Related: employee, hiring, decision making, management decision, initially
  • Retaining Staff Reducing Employee Turnover - 1,217 words
    Retaining Staff &Reducing Employee Turnover Introduction Employee turnover and the retention of valued employees are major problems facing business in the U.S. The average turnover rate is hovering at 15%. The costs associated with that turnover can be high - generally 25 percent of the individual's annual salary. Unemployment in the United States is at a 24-year low. Employee loyalty is down. Never before has it been so critical to focus on strategies for keeping good employees. However finding a solution to high turnover is not easy. One major incentive for retaining employees is the cost of turnover. Keeping good employees increases profits. Employee turnover is a direct drain on the bott ...
    Related: employee, employee compensation, employee loyalty, employee retention, employee turnover, high turnover, reducing
  • Retaining Staff Reducing Employee Turnover - 1,177 words
    ... nies offer profit sharing plans. A typical profit sharing award is 5% to 6% of employees' base salary. Lump sum merit awards provide financial recognition for an individual's job performance in lieu of merit-based salary increases. This is an effective way to provide financial recognition, especially to those individuals whose base salary is already relatively high. The lump sum merit award must be re-earned each year and is usually paid during an annual salary review period. Although paying all employees higher than average salaries and bonuses would seem to be a pay strategy that would attract the best employees, there are several drawbacks to this approach. Employees who receive highe ...
    Related: employee, employee benefits, employee turnover, reducing, retaining, staff, turnover
  • The Effect Of Innovative Benefits And Services On Employee Retention - 1,863 words
    The Effect Of Innovative Benefits And Services On Employee Retention WEBSTER UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL THE EFFECT OF INNOVATIVE BENEFITS AND SERVICES ON EMPLOYEE RETENTION AT SAS INSTITUTE, INC. by A paper presented to the Graduate School of Webster University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts July 26, 2000 Pope Airforce Base, NC Abstract Employee benefits programs are crucial to the recruitment and retention of employees in any industry. Effective programs enable employees to better cope with the demands of home and the workplace. These same policies can also contribute to lower employee turnover rates, retention of qualified employees, and motivat ...
    Related: customer retention, employee, employee benefits, employee retention, employee turnover, innovative, retention
  • The Effect Of Innovative Benefits And Services On Employee Retention - 1,877 words
    ... yees and their dependants at no cost. To make it even easier to stay fit, SAS offers a free laundering service of gym clothes (Anthes, 1997). At the gym employees may purchase a low-fat snack or lunch at the food bar (Williams, 1999). Unlike most such firms (Albertson, 2000), Two subsidized on-site cafeterias make it easy to have a good meal at SAS, where the average cost is $3.44 (Williams, 1999). The food service facilities just make enough to keep them open. The cafeterias also provide live piano music for diners (Anthes, 1997). Employees can check the days menu on their office computer (Williams, 1999). Because SAS has many international employees, the cafeterias offer theme days, wh ...
    Related: employee, employee health, employee retention, food service, innovative, retention
  • 1 Andy Grove And His Role In Intels Success - 1,738 words
    1. Andy Grove and his role in Intels Success When I think of Intel, I think of Andrew Grove. That may be due to my age, and the fact that I was too young in 1968 to know that Gordon Moore and Robert Noyce, pioneers in the semiconductor industry, had left Fairchild Semiconductor to form Intel Corporation. But I believe that my association of Grove with Intel is due more to the tremendous influence that he has had on the company as the official and unofficial overseer of Intels internal operations from the beginning. Even though he did not join Intels executive committee until 1976, and did not become CEO until 1987, it is clear that he has been the leader at Intel since the beginning. He has ...
    Related: andy, grove, intel corporation, gordon moore, marine corps
  • Managers Must Have Great Personal Skills - 395 words
    1.) Managers must have great personal skills so that they can effectively communicate goals of the manager to his or her workers. Managers must also be great motivators. If workers are motivated to perform at their best and want to do the best job they can, the results of their work will be better. Managers also must have an excellent and thorough understanding of the job at hand and all of its technical aspects. If managers dont have the skills needed how can he or she effectively lead their subordinates to complete the tasks. 2.) One of the best ways a manager can create a positive work environment is through positive reinforcement. If I, as a worker, completed a task that I felt I had don ...
    Related: the manager, positive reinforcement, work environment, white collar, workers
  • 1984 - 611 words
    1984 Winston Smith, the main character, works in London, at the Ministry of Truth. London is a city in Airstrip One, a Province of Oceania. A government that goes by the name Big Brother has taken over the world. The Party with Big Brother as its leader rules Oceania, a state and one of the great powers of the world. Winston hates the life he lives under the inflexible government and decides to write down his thoughts in a diary. This is considered a crime in Oceania and Winston knows that. And he knows one day he will be discovered by the Thought Police. To keep the members of this party occupied, frequent two minute Hate Sessions are held to accuse the enemies of the party such as Emmanuel ...
    Related: 1984, winston smith, great powers, big brother, pretending
  • A Birth Of A Nation The Bicycle Thieves - 1,300 words
    A Birth Of A Nation - The Bicycle Thieves In that paper, I will try to compare two films which are A Birth of a Nation directed by D.W.Griffith and The Bicycle Thieves directed by De Sica. After giving the story of the films, I will try to explain their technical features and their similarities. A Birth of a Nation by D. W. Griffith Griffith can be seen as the first 'modern' director, his greatest achievements being the historical epics The Birth Of A Nation. When it was released, it was one of the longest films ever made, over three hours in length. The prologue depicts the introduction of slavery to America in the seventeenth century and the beginnings of the abolitionist movement. The maj ...
    Related: bicycle, thieves, civil rights, ku klux klan, sequence
  • A Current Look At Japans Financial And Political Risk - 992 words
    A Current Look at Japans Financial and Political Risk A global company faces a number of different types of risks-economic, legal, political, and competitive. The nature and severity of such risks are not the same for all countries. A global company is in a position to manage such risks effectively by planning and implementing strategies aimed at diffusing risk. By keeping a breast of news-breaking developments, and not easily forgetting the past, an international company will have the ability to achieve successful use of strategic risk management in the global business environment. In the past five years, much to their disgrace, Japan has fell victim to numerous financial scandals. In addit ...
    Related: financial institution, financial management, financial market, financial risk, financial system, political risk, risk management
  • A Doll House - 1,407 words
    A Doll House Nora Perceived by Other Characters In the Victorian age many woman were thought of as mere objects. Most woman has no real social status and were not allowed to express themselves freely. A Dolls House, a play by Henrik Ibsen, has brought controversy to the conclusion in which Nora leaves her family. Nora perceived in many different ways is the catalyst that forces Nora to leave her family. Many people had found it difficult to understand how Nora could dessert her husband and children. In the Victorian Age it was not only unheard of to walk out on your loved ones but unethical as well. There are many incidents that inch by inch helps Nora come to the conclusion that she must le ...
    Related: doll, doll house, dolls house, real world, different ways
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