Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: empiricism

  • 39 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • A Universal Perspective On Belief: - 1,897 words
    A Universal Perspective On Belief: A Universal Perspective on Belief: A Response to Pragmatic and Cartesian Approaches to Epistemology By Britta Rempel (*note to reader:I hope this gives all of you struggling with some concepts in Intro to Philosophy a clearer view on how to approach your own paper, please do not plagerise) The approaches given by Pierce and Nagel to the epistemological questions of doubt and belief, though diverse in that they are strictly pragmatist and Cartesian, contain a similar underlying principle. They both serve to show that belief cannot come from any source that appeals to one's feelings or purposes, experiences or impressions. Beliefs must arise from a non-person ...
    Related: fetal alcohol syndrome, alcohol syndrome, illegal drug, empiricism, stability
  • Adjustment Disorder With Depressed Mood - 1,468 words
    Adjustment Disorder With Depressed Mood Running Head: ADJUSTMENT DISORDER WITH DEPRESSED MOOD CAUSE Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, Cause and Affect Abstract Research was conducted to investigate Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, and some causes, affects, and treatment approaches. Not all individuals manifest or demonstrate the same depressive symptoms, which can make it difficult for clinicians to diagnose and treat. The American Psychiatric Association has categorized various depressive disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV, 1994). Researchers have investigated the validity of the DSM diagnostic criteria over the year ...
    Related: adjustment, depressed, disorder, mood, treating depression
  • Descartes - 1,785 words
    Descartes Ren Descartes is often referred to as the father of modern philosophy. Although some controversy exist over the appropriateness of such a label one can hardly dispute the fact that his approach to philosophy was dramatically different than many of his contemporaries. Descartes grew tired of how dogmatically the ideologies of past philosophers were presented and how dissimilar and unsystematic each was. Breaking free of the custom of merely reworking prior philosophical doctrines Descartes took a fresh approach to discovering knowledge, truth, and understanding. He disregarded the classic texts in favor of what he called "the great book of the world." In his travels though he found ...
    Related: descartes, descartes meditations, first philosophy, public sector, grave
  • Emersonian Individualism - 1,491 words
    Emersonian Individualism Emerson's "transcendentalism" is essentially a romantic individualism, a philosophy of life for a new people who had overthrown their colonial governors and set about conquering a new continent by their own lights. Though Emerson is not a technical philosopher, the tendency of his thought is toward idealist metaphysics in which soul and intuition, or inspiration, are central. The new American experiment needed every idea within its reach. Taking a practical and democratic, yet poetic interest in all of nature and in individuals of every walk of life, Emerson stresses the potential for genius and creativity in all people. It is a source of creative insight within whic ...
    Related: emersonian, individualism, century europe, common sense, philosophy
  • England Latin Anglia, Political Division Of The Island Of Great Britain, Constituting, With Wales, The Principal Division Of - 4,705 words
    ... ion that was to last for 400 years. William was a hard ruler, punishing England, especially the north, when it disputed his authority. His power and efficiency can be seen in the Domesday Survey, a census for tax purposes, and in the Salisbury Oath of allegiance, which he demanded of all tenants. He appointed Lanfranc, an Italian clergyman, as archbishop of Canterbury. He also promoted church reform, especially by the creation of separate church courts, but retained royal control. When William died in 1087, he gave England to his second son, William II (Rufus), and Normandy to his eldest son, Robert. Henry, his third son, in due time got bothEngland in 1100, when William II died in a hun ...
    Related: bank of england, church of england, division, great britain, great schism, latin, political ideas
  • England Went Through Dramatic Changes In The 19th Century - 511 words
    England went through dramatic changes in the 19th century. English culture, socio-economic structure and politics where largely influenced by the principles of science. Many social expressions occurred due to these changes. Transformations which categorized this time period could be observed in social institutions; for instance: the switch from popular Evangelicalism to atheism, emergence of feminism and the creation of new political ideologies (Liberalism, Conservatism and Radicalism). These are just a few of the changes that took place. All of this social alteration can be attributed to the importance of science. The English people began to trust more in empiricism and logical thought than ...
    Related: international system, social institutions, animal kingdom, conservatism, competing
  • For A Genuine Empiricist The Phrase God Exists Is Meaningless - 1,528 words
    ... ng of the question, a few key concepts must first be established. What is meant by the term Empiricism? To an empiricist, the occurrence of consciousness is simply the product of experience. It is assumed that all human knowledge is acquired from experience and observation alone. It is believed that we are born with an empty slate; it is through sense perception that our knowledge begins to form and shape our mind. Empiricism is against the idea of spontaneous or a priori thought (knowledge that is independent of all particular experience). They believe in a posteriori knowledge, which is derives from experience alone. The belief opposing Empiricism is that of Rationalism. In this philos ...
    Related: genuine, meaningless, phrase, concerning human, gods existence
  • George Berkley: His View Of God - 1,262 words
    George Berkley: His View Of God George Berkeley: His View of God As man progressed through the various stages of evolution, it is assumed that at a certain point he began to ponder the world around him. Of course, these first attempts fell short of being scholarly, probably consisting of a few grunts and snorts at best. As time passed on, though, these ideas persisted and were eventually tackled by the more intellectual, so-called philosophers. Thus, excavation of the external world began. As the authoritarinism of the ancients gave way to the more liberal views of the modernists, two main positions concerning epistemology and the nature of the world arose. The first view was exemplified by ...
    Related: george berkeley, john locke, david hume, david, perception
  • Greek Roman Godstructures - 2,034 words
    ... ence -- but in a mode that differs fundamentally from ordinary experience. According to Husserl, true positivism does not reduce phenomenon to a physical perspective, but instead places the emphasis on consciousness itself. In his original conception of phenomenology, Husserl's idea of a presuppositionless science amounted to rejecting all antecedent commitments to theories of knowledge, both those formally developed as philosophical systems and those which pervade our ordinary thinking. Identifying any previous knowledge, ideas, or beliefs about phenomenon under investigation, allowed the examiner to be impartial. He intended by this bracketing of scientific or cultural presuppositions ...
    Related: greek, greek / roman, greek roman, roman, edmund husserl
  • Hawaiian Overthrow - 1,268 words
    ... nnexation of the Hawaiian Kingdom was mostly her fault. She isolated several groups of people and made them feel that and overthrow was the only way out. Even people who had been staunch monarchists through the whole process started to dislike the way she was running the kingdom. One of the most outspoken adversaries of Liliuokalani was J.L. Kaulukou, who one time was a strong royalist and even gave her the name onipaa which means steadfast. Liliuokalani even adopted that as her personal motto and it is widely used today by sovereignty activists . He was the appointed Marshall of the Hawaiian Kingdom, from 1884-1888, and he said in 1898: I regard annexation as the best thing that could h ...
    Related: hawaiian, hawaiian islands, overthrow, world power, states government
  • Henri Bergson - 753 words
    Henri Bergson Henri Bergson was a modern philosopher who merged empiricism with a bit of rationalism to become part of a new empiricism that held room for intuition and movement with a flux through time. He essentially refused sciences claim to explain the universe in mechanical conditions; instead he considered life an unending creation, a matter of change and time unlike something static. In Henri Bergsons (originally?) dualistic realm there existed the distinctive modes of consciousness or knowing: analysis and intuition. Intuition consists of an internal grasping of an object, consequently capturing its very essence or heart. Analysis is basically an external or relative way to understan ...
    Related: bergson, henri, henri bergson, human experience, scientific process
  • Henri Bergsonanalysis And Intuition - 759 words
    Henri Bergson-Analysis And Intuition Analysis and Intuition Henri Bergson was a modern philosopher who merged empiricism with a bit of rationalism to become part of a new empiricism that held room for intuition and movement with a flux through time. He essentially refused sciences claim to explain the universe in mechanical conditions; instead he considered life an unending creation, a matter of change and time unlike something static. In Henri Bergsons (originally?) dualistic realm there existed the distinctive modes of consciousness or knowing: analysis and intuition. Intuition consists of an internal grasping of an object, consequently capturing its very essence or heart. Analysis is basi ...
    Related: henri, henri bergson, intuition, scientific process, human experience
  • Hume Vs Kant - 1,407 words
    Hume Vs Kant Morality Hume vs. Kant David Hume and Immanuel Kant each made a significant break from other theorists in putting forward a morality that doesnt require a higher being or god, for a man to recognize his moral duty. Although Hume and Kant shared some basic principals they differed on their view of morality. In comparing the different views on human will and the maxims established to determine moral worth by David Hume and Immanuel Kant, I find their theories on morality have some merit although limited in view. Hume and Kant shared some basic principle of empiricism, but each took different directions on the theory of morality. The moral theory of Hume was based on his belief tha ...
    Related: david hume, hume, immanuel kant, kant, moral life
  • Identify And Discuss The Elements Of Romanticism As Given Expression In John Keats Poem Lamia And William Wordsworths Excerpt - 302 words
    Identify and discuss the elements of Romanticism as given expression in John Keats' poem Lamia and William Wordsworth's excerpt from The Excursion. The term 'romanticism' is used to describe the aesthetic movement during the period from about 1776-1834. It was a revolutionary movement because it focused on ideals which in stark contrast to the 'Classical' movement, The Enlightenment, which preceded it. More importantly however is the fact that it reflected the social climate of the period which with the development of the French Revolution was in itself revolutionary. Rationalism, empiricism, materialism and mechanism were the central were the central philosophies of The Enlightenment and wa ...
    Related: excerpt, john keats, keats, poem, romanticism, william wordsworth
  • John Keats Romantism - 305 words
    John Keat`s Romantism Identify and discuss the elements of Romanticism as given expression in John Keats' poem Lamia and William Wordsworth's excerpt from The Excursion. The term'romanticism' is used to describe the aesthetic movement during the period from about 1776-1834. It was a revolutionary movement because it focused on ideals which in stark contrast to the 'Classical' movement, The Enlightenment, which preceded it. More importantly however is the fact that it reflected the social climate of the period which with the development of the French Revolution was in itself revolutionary. Rationalism, empiricism, materialism and mechanism were the central were the central philosophies of The ...
    Related: john keats, keats, divine powers, william wordsworth, literature
  • John Locke - 762 words
    John Locke John Locke John Locke was an English philosopher and political theorist during the 1600s. He was also the founder of British empiricism. He is known for his great contribution to the Enlightenment period, in which he gave people the idea of natural rights and a government that protects those rights. John Locke also wrote a famous essay called Concerning Human Understanding and attacked the theory of divine right of kings in Two Treatises of Government. John Locke was a very important philosopher and his ideas effected many people. John Locke was born in Wrinlington, Somerset on August 29,1632. He lived from 1632 to 1704. He was the son of a puritan lawyer who fought for Cromwell i ...
    Related: john locke, locke, concerning human, human understanding, philosophy
  • John Locke - 1,416 words
    John Locke John Locke (1632-1704) was born in Wrington, England to Puritan parents who fostered his education in theology and politics. He attended the Westminster school, and then entered Christ Church, Oxford, where he received a scholarship. Locke studied classical languages, metaphysics, logic, and rhetoric there. He developed friendships with Robert Boyle and Isaac Newton, both of whom influenced his views. In 1690, he wrote An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, this is considered his greatest work. The essay tries to set limits on human understanding. Locke attempts to answer two questions. The first question is where we get our ideas from. The second question is whether we can rely ...
    Related: john locke, john stuart, john stuart mill, locke, concerning human understanding
  • John Locke Theory Of Property - 1,946 words
    John Locke Theory Of Property Perhaps one of, if not the, most historically influential political thinkers of the western world was John Locke. John Locke, the man who initiated what is now known as British Empiricism, is also considered highly influential in establishing grounds, theoretically at least, for the constitution of the United States of America. The basis for understanding Locke is that he sees all people as having natural God given rights. As God's creations, this denotes a certain equality, at least in an abstract sense. This religious back drop acts as a the foundation for all of Locke's theories, including his theories of individuality, private property, and the state. The re ...
    Related: john locke, locke, private property, united states of america, parental authority
  • John Stuart Mill - 527 words
    John Stuart Mill After reading 100% of the book, New Ideas From Dead Economists, I chose to write a little summery of John Stuart Mill. I did a little outside research on the subject, because his theories and philosophies were intriguing to me. I was impressed by his change in his views as he entered his mid twenties. John Stuart Mill was born in London on May 20, 1806, and was the oldest son of James Mill. His education, as a boy, was carried out by his father, James Mill. John's discipline was extremely rigid, as a result, he believed it gave him the intellectual advantage of a quarter century on his contemporaries. Later in life Mill recognized that his father's extreme system of intellec ...
    Related: john mill, john stuart, john stuart mill, mill, stuart, stuart mill
  • Kant - 1,618 words
    Kant How does one label Kant as a philosopher? Is he a rationalist or an empiricist? Kant makes a distinction between appearances and things in themselves. He also says that things in themselves exist, and that we have no knowledge of things in themselves. This could be labeled CLOSE TO NONSENSE, but we know Kant better than that. No matter how many laps on the track of metaphysics Kant takes us through, he is still widely held as one of the greatest modern philosophers of our time. Let us explore the schools of rationalism and empiricism and compare his views with that of other rationalists and empiricists (mainly Hume), and see where he ends up on the finish line towards the nature of huma ...
    Related: kant, finish line, innate ideas, primary sources, ideology
  • 39 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2