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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: american community

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  • African American Community - 3,076 words
    African American Community By 1945, nearly everyone in the African American community had heard gospel music (2). At this time, gospel music was a sacred folk music with origins in field hollers, work songs, slave songs, Baptist lining hymns, and Negro spirituals. These songs that influenced gospel music were adapted and reworked into expressions of praise and thanks of the community. Although the harmonies were similar to those of the blues or hymns in that they shared the same simplicity, the rhythm was much different. The rhythms often times had the music with its unique accents, the speech, walk, and laughter which brought along with it synchronized movements. (2) The gospel piano style ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, american life
  • African American Community - 3,040 words
    ... stood that his name would not appear in the program credits or advertising. For twenty weeks, the Mahalia Jackson Show ran on television for a half-hour each episode. Beginning in September 1954, the show did not last very long. Mahalias show featured her singing traditional gospels and spirituals with a few miscellaneous songs but the show was missing a major component. (2) The show was in need of a sponsor and began to go out of business. The show went from thirty minutes airtime to ten minutes and eventually ended in February 1955. This was not the end of Mahalia's television appearances however. The TV station, WBBM-TV of Chicago asked Mahalia to be a guest on their program, "In Town ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, race relations
  • African American Culture - 957 words
    African American Culture African American Culture Culture is not a fixed phenomenon, nor is it the same in all places or to all people. It is relative to time, place, and particular people. Learning about other people can help us to understand ourselves and to be better world citizens. One of the most common ways of studying culture is to focus on the differences within and among cultures. Although their specifics may vary form one culture to another, sociologists refer to those elements or characteristics that can be found in every know society as cultural universals. For example, in all societies, funeral rites include expression of grief, disposing of the dead, and rituals that define the ...
    Related: african, african american, african american culture, african art, american, american community, american culture
  • African American Heritage In Chicago - 702 words
    African American Heritage In Chicago A History of African American Heritage in Chicago The massive exodus to the north began in 1915; a population of people weary of pervasive hostility and constraint in their former lives, fleeing a social system comprised of miserable oppression and repeated violence. The primary cities for resettlement became New York and Chicago, metropolises humming with the vigor of big-city life and the excitement of a new beginning. When the Chicago Commission asked African American migrants in interviews on Race Relations in 1922 why they came to Chicago, responses were similar. Im looking for better wages. I wanted to get away from the South, and to earn more money ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, american heritage, american population, american youth
  • African American Writers - 910 words
    African American Writers The African- American Community has been blessed with a multitude of scholars. Two of those scholars include Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du bois. Both of these men, had a vision for African- Americans. They wanted to see the advancement of their race of people. These great leaders just had different viewpoints as to how this should be accomplished. Mr. Washingtons viewpoints are based on his own personal experience and understanding of politics. Mr. Du bois viewpoints came from his knowledge of the importance of education and its ability to break down barriers of color. Washington and Du bois wanted to see the advancement of the African-American people. The quest ...
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  • American Dream Freedom - 1,276 words
    American Dream Freedom What was the dream that brought our ancestors to America? It was rebirth, the craving for men to be born again, the yearning for a second chance. With all of these ideas comes the true American dream - Freedom. This is the condition in which a man feels like a human being. It is the purpose and consequence of rebirth. Throughout the life of Langston Hughes he presented ideas in his writings that help to define his perception of the American dream.In beginning, Langston Hughes was born on February 1, 1902 in Joplin, Missouri. His father was James Nathaniel Hughes, a man who studied law but was unable to take the examination for the bar because he was black. His mother ...
    Related: african american, american, american community, american dream, dream
  • Benjamin Franklin - 1,032 words
    Benjamin Franklin Benjamin Franklin Benjamin Franklin's Autobiography is broken up into four integral parts, all written during different periods in Franklin's life. The first part, addressed to his son, William, was written when Franklin was sixty-five years old. Before he began the task of recording his past, Franklin carefully wrote out a list of topics he would narrate to his readers. Eleven years later, this list somehow fell into the hands of Abel James who urged Franklin to finish writing his memoirs. In 1782, Franklin completed the second part of his autobiography in France where he served as a peace commissioner, and in 1788, Franklin composed the longest part of his autobiography a ...
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  • Birth Of A Nation: The Suppression Of A People - 1,772 words
    Birth of a Nation: The Suppression of a People Birth of a Nation: The Suppression of a People America is believed to be founded as the first state founded on the notion that democracy is for all people, however this is far from the truth. Not only did it take almost two hundred years till the American government grants full opportunities to African American, they even accepted the slavery of these peoples for almost half of that time. A republic government, such as the American government, is based on the idea that all people can have an equal represented fairly and have an equal vote. This is very hard to accomplish when groups of people living within that republic are discriminated against ...
    Related: american people, colored people, suppression, point of view, new brunswick
  • Black Boy And Their Eyes Were Watching God - 1,878 words
    Black Boy And Their Eyes Were Watching God I. Abstract This paper examines the drastic differences in literary themes and styles of Richard Wright and Zora Neale Hurston, two African--American writers from the early 1900's. The portrayals of African-American women by each author are contrasted based on specific examples from their two most prominent novels, Native Son by Wright, and Their Eves Were Watching God by Hurston. With the intent to explain this divergence, the autobiographies of both authors (Black Boy and Dust Tracks on a Road) are also analyzed. Particular examples from the lives of each author are cited to demonstrate the contrasting lifestyles and experiences that created these ...
    Related: black boy, black woman, black women, most black, their eyes were watching god
  • Bluest Eye - 1,172 words
    Bluest Eye Toni Morisson's novel The Bluest Eye is about the life of the Breedlove family who resides in Lorain, Ohio, in the late 1930s. This family consists of the mother Pauline, the father Cholly, the son Sammy, and the daughter Pecola. The novel's focal point is the daughter, an eleven-year-old Black girl who is trying to conquer a bout with self-hatred. Everyday she encounters racism, not just from white people, but mostly from her own race. In their eyes she is much too dark, and the darkness of her skin somehow implies that she is inferior, and according to everyone else, her skin makes her even "uglier." She feels she can overcome this battle of self-hatred by obtaining blue eyes, b ...
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  • Diabeties In Native Americans - 611 words
    Diabeties In Native Americans Scott Johnson English 101 / 1314 Mrs. Wendalll 14 February, 2000 Diabetes in Native Americans The Native American way of life has certainly changed over the course of the last one hundred years. What used to be a very strong presence on the American frontier is now a humbled group of people pushed onto ground that nobody else wanted. Along with this change came diabetes, which now affects more than sixty percent of the Pima Indians in Arizona and fifty-seven percent of the Aberdeen area of the Indian Health Service (which includes North and South Dakota, Iowa and Nebraska)(Sandrick 42). Native Americans did not have a problem with this affliction until this cent ...
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  • Farewell To Manzanar - 1,448 words
    Farewell To Manzanar In spring of 1942, immediately after the United States entered war with Japan, the Federal government instructed a policy where hundreds of thousands of people of Japanese ancestry were evacuated into relocation camps. Many agree that the United States government was not justified with their treatment towards the Japanese during World War II. This Japanese-American experience of incarceration is believed to be unconstitutional, demonstrating racism and causing social and economic hardships for the evacuees. The location of one of the camps in California, Manzanar, "was representative of the atmosphere of racial prejudice, mistrust, and fear, that resulted in American cit ...
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  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - 1,768 words
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Preventable Birth Defect If women didnt drink anymore during pregnancy, there would never be another baby born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Fetal Alcohol Effect (McCuen 33). This is a very powerful statement. It is also a very simple cure for an alarmingly high birth defect that all women have the power to stop. Every year more than 40,000 American children are born with defects because their mother drank alcohol while pregnant (McCuen 34). That is 1 to 3 per 1,000 live births (McCuen 31). Many of these cases go undiagnosed It is also the number one cause of mental retardation in the United States, and one of the three leading causes of bir ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol dependency, alcohol syndrome, drink alcohol, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome
  • Freedom Through Christianity - 1,011 words
    Freedom through Christianity What do people look for in religion? Do they look for guidance, beliefs, reason, or do they look for help? African-Americans have looked for all of these for many years. They found all of these in Christianity. Christians believe in one God who they worship, trust, and look up to. Since Christianity was first intorduced in the early Colonial Period, African-Americans have used their Christian beliefs to fight horrible things that have gone on in America such as slavery and segregation. As African-Americans were captured through the slave trade and brought to the colonies they possessed many different religious beliefs. Many people are extremely ignorant in histor ...
    Related: christianity, christian faith, self esteem, american community, esteem
  • Hate Crimes In America - 1,944 words
    Hate Crimes In America Hate Crimes In America Did you know that people with blonde hair have low I.Q.s? Or that people less than five feet tall are more likely to spread a disease? How about that people with brown eyes are really worshipers of Satan? That did not sound very logical, did it? No, you know that people with blonde hair can be as smart or as unintelligent as the next person, that short people are not necessarily better hosts to disease, and that people with brown eyes can believe in whatever they want. Some people, on the other hand, would say these things made perfect sense when applied to a different race, religion, ethnic background, gender or sexual orientation. The idea of p ...
    Related: america, hate crime, hate crimes, hate groups, ku klux klan
  • Hindu Revival In America - 2,214 words
    Hindu Revival In America Hindu Revival In An Alien Land. America is coming alive with the sounds and images of Hinduism. From Ras and Garbha dances during Navratri in Chicago and Edison to Diwali fireworks in Manhattan's South Street Seaport; from the sounds of conches and the chanting of hymnals at temple ceremonies in Pittsburgh and Flushing to the consecration of new dieties at the Balaji Temple in Bridgewater, N.J., and the foundation-laying ceremony for a new Shree Raseshwari temple in Austin, Texas; from the modest get-togethers of the devout before a makeshift alter in a three-car garage in Glen Mills, Pa., to mini-culfests in Atlanta and New York University, the American landscape th ...
    Related: america, hindu, revival, material culture, york city
  • Huey P Newton And The Black Panther Party - 1,428 words
    ... hers engaged young people who had given up society that they could make a difference and stop the daily brutality of police, which haunted many cities ( Acoli 1) . Hugh Pearson argues that the Panthers 'in your face' action has shaped the way police officers act in neighborhoods today. The party's message spread across the country like wildfire, engaging young Blacks in Northern Black communities. Branches of the Party in New York, Chicago and Oakland worked with gangs, trying to turn them away from violence and into community organizing ( Acoli 2). Vincent Harding historian of the civil rights movement said: The Panthers offered the young urban black male a purpose in their life. They w ...
    Related: black community, black history, black liberation, black nationalist, black panther, black panther party, black people
  • Human Aggression - 1,123 words
    Human Aggression Genetically inherited or environmentally learned? The question has been asked for years. Is human aggression genetically linked or is it the environment that determines our aggressive nature? Over the years there have been many theories proposed supporting the idea that aggression has a genetic link in humans. "A century ago, Italian physician Cesare Lombroso claimed that sloping foreheads, jutting chins and long arms were signs of born criminals" (Toufexis 52). More recently, claims have been made that "Man is a predator whose natural instinct is to kill with a weapon"(Leakey 23). Again, there have been quit a few ideas presented proclaiming mans' genetic link to aggression ...
    Related: aggression, human aggression, environmental factors, sigmund freud, genetics
  • Integration And Animal Farm By Orwell - 1,098 words
    Integration And Animal Farm By Orwell Derrick Robicheaux Auditing 11:00-11:50 Integration of Education in the United States Throughout history, education is recognized as one of the key components of any civilized society. It is a natural instinct for man to learn, and feel the need to pass on that knowledge to their young and to all those who come behind them. People have a passion for education, and will fight for the opportunity to gain the valuable knowledge that education provides. The importance of education in a society is illustrated in two aspects. The first being the actual events in American history regarding the desegregation of schools, and the second being the action of the ani ...
    Related: animal farm, farm, george orwell, integration, manor farm, orwell
  • Irish Research Paper - 1,517 words
    ... g within families where people helped each other with what they needed done. I also found that relationship was important for the same reasons, family. Character and aggressiveness were the traits most impeding in the reading. Flexibility ------------------------- Order/Structure There is much order, because things need to be done, and if there is no order, and structure, there tends to be chaos and instability. Linear ------------------------ Holistic The tendency of Irish is to be very holistic, and look for more than one way to figure out a problem. This was true though the readings and in my own experience. IV. Interviews: The generalizations were somewhat true. That is how they beco ...
    Related: irish, irish american, irish immigrants, research paper, american society
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