Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: emil

  • 21 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Alfred Nobel - 702 words
    Alfred Nobel Alfred Nobel was born in Stockholm on October 21, 1833. By the age of 17 he was fluent in Swedish, Russian, French, English and German. Early in his life he had a huge interest in English literature and poetry as well as in chemistry and physics. Alfred's father disliked his interest in poetry and found his son rather introverted. In order to widen Alfred's horizons his father sent him to different institutions for further training in chemical engineering. During a two-year period he visited Sweden, Germany, France and the United States. He came to enjoy Paris the best. There he worked in the private laboratory of Professor T. J. Pelouze, a famous chemist. He also met the young ...
    Related: alfred, alfred nobel, nobel, nobel prize, chemical engineering
  • Alfred Nobel His Prizes - 1,205 words
    Alfred Nobel & His Prizes In addressing hope, Alfred Nobel referred to it as nature's veil for hiding truth's nakedness2. Such a statement encompasses the struggle associated with Nobels lifework. Alfred Nobels existence spanned many realms of thought and being. He was a scientist, a writer, a philosopher and humanitarian, and ultimately a philanthropist. It was probably this myriad of influences and inspirations that injected him into the core of friction between science and society, between knowledge and application. This work will elucidate Nobels motivation for creating the Nobel Prize with the assertion that the prize is an instrument used to reconcile the incongruity between science an ...
    Related: alfred, alfred nobel, nobel, nobel prize, tsar nicholas
  • Alfred Nobel His Prizes - 1,163 words
    ... need for cutting labor costs. At this point Alfred and his father were tragically reminded of the peril of nitroglycerine due to the Heleneborg disaster in which Emil was killed as well as some others.4 After this point both Alfred and Immanuel were emotionally traumatized. Soon after Emils death Alfred focused on the manufacturing methods of nitroglycerine and eventually created conditions in which it was rendered harmless. In speaking of Alfred Nobels response to the death of his brother Evlanoff states: He blamed himself with bitterness He mourned that he had not been able to accomplish this sooner, so Emil need not have died. He could never forget the dreadful day of the Heleneborg ...
    Related: alfred, alfred nobel, nobel, nobel peace, nobel peace prize, nobel prize
  • Alzheimer's: Is There A Cure - 999 words
    Alzheimer'S: Is There A Cure? Alzheimer's: Is there a cure? In February of 2000, I lost my grandmother to Alzheimer's disease. She was diagnosed with the disease just less than two years prior to her death. Throughout that time, I watched changes in my grandmother that made her seem like an entirely different woman to me. She gradually began losing her short-term memory and we began to see signs of her long-term memory degrading too. It began to get harder and harder to take her out into public without being afraid of what would happen next. Her emotions would fluctuate with the changing of each minute it seemed. Physically she became weaker and weaker and would often scare us with falling w ...
    Related: cure, elderly people, food and drug administration, long-term memory, lowering
  • Anesthetics - 1,530 words
    Anesthetics Anesthesia is a partial or complete loss of sensation or feeling induced by the administration of various substances. For many decade, people have used one form of an anesthetic during surgical procedures. Some people also use some of these anesthetics as recreational drugs, e.g. laughing gas (a.k.a. Nitrous Oxide). The term anesthetic literally means "without feeling". There are many different types of anesthesia, but they are usually put into three groups. These groups are gene- ral anesthetics, local anesthetics, and spinal anesthetics. A general anesthetic causes a complete loss of consciousness. They are used when having a serious operation or in the case of an emergency ope ...
    Related: hopkins university, long history, recreational drugs, quiet, maintaining
  • Antigone Was Right - 1,045 words
    Antigone was Right The story of Antigone deals with Antigones brother whos body has been left unburied because of crimes against the state. The sight of her brother being unburied drives Antigone to take action against the state and bury her brother regardless of the consequences. The concept of the Greek afterlife was far more important and sacred than living life itself. Everything they did while they were alive was to please the many gods they worshipped. They built temples for their Gods, made statues to symbolize their Gods, and had a different God to explain things that we now say are an act of mother nature. Antigone percieved her actions to be courageous and valid, and Kreone, the Ki ...
    Related: antigone, right thing, sophocles antigone, houghton mifflin, york oxford university press
  • Carl Sandburg - 1,717 words
    Carl Sandburg As a child of an immigrant couple, Carl Sandburg was barely American himself, yet the life, which he had lived, has defined key aspects of our great country, and touched the hearts and minds of her people. Sandburg grew up in the American Midwest, yet spent the majority of his life traveling throughout the states. The country, which would define his style of poetry and his views of society, government, and culture, would equally be defined by his writing, lecturing, and the American dream he lived: The dream of becoming successful with only an idea and the will to use it. Historically, Sandburg's most defining poetic element is his free verse style. His open views towards Ameri ...
    Related: carl, carl sandburg, sandburg, puerto rico, american dream
  • Demian - 845 words
    Demian Herman Hesses novel Demian tells of a young boy named Emil Sinclair and his childhood growing up during pre-World War I. Emil struggles to find his new self-knowledge in the immoral world and is caught between good and evil, which is represented as the light and dark realms. Hesse uses much symbolic diction in his novel to give a more puissant presentation of Emil Sinclair and the conflict between right and wrong. The symbolism gives direction, foreshadow, and significance towards every aspect of the novel. Emil Sinclairs home as a young child is a very important symbol in the novel. As Emil attends school he is shown a world immoral value. The confusion of which is right or wrong cre ...
    Related: demian, real world, young boy, young child, asylum
  • Earthquakes - 2,685 words
    ... education and preparedness plans can help significantly reduce death and injury caused by earthquakes. People can take several preventative measures within their homes and at the office to reduce risk. Supports and bracing for shelves reduce the likelihood of items falling and potentially causing harm. Maintaining an earthquake survival kit in the home and at the office is also an important part of being prepared. (On shifting ground p.97) In the home, earthquake preparedness includes maintaining an earthquake kit and making sure that the house is structurally stable. The local chapter of the American Red Cross is a good source of information for how to assemble an earthquake kit. During ...
    Related: earthquakes, francisco earthquake, undergraduate degree, north american, japan
  • In Willa Cathers Novel O Pioneers We Discover The Everpresent Theory Of Survival Of The - 616 words
    In Willa Cathers novel O Pioneers we discover the ever-present theory of survival of the fittest. This story shows the brutal facts of life and that only the strong, may it be in will or man power, will strive forth and survive. This is a story of the strong in will. It is set in the open plains on the Nebraska prairie, with wild winters and beautiful springtime. It is the tale of a pioneer family, the Bergsons, and their fight for survival. Alexandra, the eldest child is left to run the farm when her father dies. Alexandra and her family suffer many hardships and soon have to make the biggest decision of their lives, whether to stay on the Great Divide and attempt to fulfill their fathers w ...
    Related: discover, willa, willa cather, young girl, great divide
  • Joseph John Thomson Was Born On December 18, 1856 Near Manchester, England His Father Died When - 1,361 words
    Joseph John Thomson was born on December 18, 1856 near Manchester, England. His father died when J.J.. was only sixteen. The young Thomson attended Owens College in Manchester, where his professor of mathematics encouraged him to apply for a scholarship at Trinity College, one of the most prestigious of the colleges at Cambridge University. Thomson won the scholarship, and in 1880 finished second in his class in the grueling graduation examination in mathematics. Trinity gave him a fellowship and he stayed on there, trying to craft mathematical models that would reveal the nature of atoms and electromagnetic forces. One hundred years ago, amidst glowing glass tubes and the hum of electricity ...
    Related: joseph, thomson, nobel peace, united kingdom, mathematics
  • Last Luagh - 1,844 words
    Last Luagh About The Director: Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau is one of the most important filmmakers of the cinema during Weimar Republic period. He is often grouped with Fritz Lang and G.W. Pabst as the big three directors of Weimar Germany. He finished his career in Hollywood and was killed at a young age in a car crash. Three of his films appear on the greatest films lists of critics and film groups. Even though there seems to be little written about him. Early in his career he created one of horror film, Nosferatu (1922); his last film was Tabu (1931), a documentary film in the South Seas. He was one of the pioneers in the technical side of the film industry, experimenting special effects in ...
    Related: general public, main character, world war i, documentary, silent
  • Modernism - 2,351 words
    ... A scandalized contemporary critic declared Matisse and his fellow artistsAndr Derain, Maurice de Vlaminck, and Georges Braque (of France), and Kees van Dongen (of the Netherlands)to be fauves (French for wild beasts). This derogatory term became the name of their movement. Fauvism lasted only from about 1898 to 1908, but it had an enduring impact on 20th-century art. [ ] B. Cubism [ ] Print section [ ] Pablo Picasso, a friend and rival of Matisse, also invented a new style of painting, focusing mainly on line rather than color. Picasso's art changed radically around 1907, when he decided to incorporate some stylistic elements of African sculpture into his paintings. Unlike Matisse's plea ...
    Related: modernism, folk art, interior design, human body, square
  • Nazi Art - 1,056 words
    Nazi Art Many people know that Adolph Hitler was an artist in his youth as an Austrian, but just how much art played a role in the National Socialist Germany seems to get underrated in the history books. Just as a racial war was waged against the Jewish population and the military fought the French and the Slavic people, an artistic cleansing for the Germanic culture was in progress. Special Nazi units were searching the ancient arts of antiquity for evidence of a great Germanic race that existed well before history. Hitler had monuments and museums built on a grand scale with carefully designed architecture that would last a thousand years. Art of this nature was a priority because Hitler w ...
    Related: nazi, nazi party, modern art, adolph hitler, bauhaus
  • O Pioneers - 817 words
    O Pioneers! O Pioneers! After reading the novel, O Pioneers!, it was hard to judge whether it was a tragedy or a triumph. I think the answer you are looking for would be a triumph. The only way I see it as a tragedy is that Emil and Maria died. I knew, since page six of the book, that they were destined to be together. It kind of broke my heart to see later on that she had married someone else. But when her and Emil got shot, I thought it may finish as a tragedy. But overall, I would see it as a triumph in the way that the Bergson's finally got what they wanted out of their land. It made them rich. Also, Alexandra and Carl finally married. And being that the whole novel was basically based o ...
    Related: best friend, world today, romantic love, emil, america
  • Our Town By Thorton Wilder 1897 1975 - 1,758 words
    Our Town by Thorton Wilder (1897 - 1975) Our Town by Thorton Wilder (1897 - 1975) Type of Work: Presentational life drama Setting Grover's Corners, New Hampshire; 1901 to 1913 Principal Characters Stage Ma Beer, the play's all-wise narrator Dr. and Mrs. Gibbs, an ordinary small- town physician and housewife George Gibbs, their son Mr. and Mrs. Webb, a news editor and his wife Emily Webb, their daughter Simon Stimson , the town drunkard and church choir organist A conglomeration of other ordinary people living out ordinary lives Story Overveiw Act 1. Daily Life: The Stage Manager speaks while pointing to different parts of the stage: "Up here is Main Street ... Here's the Town Hall and Post O ...
    Related: our town, small town, thornton wilder, thorton, wilder
  • Richard Wagner Wunderkind Or Monster - 1,889 words
    ... gner, with blinding clarity, saw as the woman. Lohengrin remains the German fairytale opera, in which Wagner used orchestral colors that had never been heard before. Tannhuser did quite well in Dresden in 1845 but Wagner's real troubles with the work began in 1861, at the Paris Opra. During the second performance members of the local Jockey Club, who used to arrive late at the opera house, started a riot because they had missed the splendors of the ballet at the beginning of the first act; they were joined by a large group who were opposed to Wagner. After the third performance, he withdrew the work. Lohengrin too had mixed reception. Wagner wrote it backwards starting with the third act ...
    Related: monster, richard strauss, richard wagner, wagner, holy grail
  • Rose For Emily - 1,400 words
    Rose For Emily William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" is the story of a woman's reluctance towards change. The story encompasses the entire town's unwillingness to change, while focusing on the protagonist, Emily Grierson. Faulkner uses symbols throughout the story to cloak an almost allegorical correlation to the reconstruction period of the South. Even though these symbols are open to interpretation, they are the heart and soul of the story. While the literal meaning of Faulkner's story implies many different conclusions, it is primarily the psychological and symbolic aspects which give the story meaning. Exploring these aspects will shed light on Faulkner's intention of "A Rose for Emily." ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, emily grierson, emily william faulkner, poor emily, rose for emily
  • The Art Of Influence - 1,035 words
    ... , this composition is done in the celebrated cubist structure. Picasso's portrait of Gertrude Stein includes mask like treatment of her face, which was influenced by African artists. Other Picasso paintings indicating African influence include, Seated Nude done in 1907, Nude Figure of 1910, and Man with Mandolin completed in 1911. Head of a Woman, done in 1909, as well as Mandolin and Clarinet, 1913 illustrates Pablo Picasso's interest in the sculptural form of African sculptures. Picasso was not the only European artist to find inspiration from ethnic art. Another artist, whose work exemplifies African influence, is Paul Gauguin. After being drawn into Impressionism, Gauguin realized th ...
    Related: van gogh, german expressionism, paul gauguin, couch, comprehensive
  • The Island By Gary Paulsen - 415 words
    The Island by Gary Paulsen The book I read was The Island by Gary Paulsen. It is about a 15 year old boy named Wil Neuton who moves with his family to northern Wisconsin. There he finds an island on Sucker Lake where he stays to learn about himself. Wil likes riding his bike early in the morning. He also likes watching nature. He is very tall for his age-6 feet 2-but well-built and strong. He is honest,cares about others and prefers to talk things through than resort to violence. The title is good because the book is very much about the island and about Wil finding himself on this island. The island also becomes a very prominent point in Wil's life. By comparison and observation, he learns t ...
    Related: gary, gary paulsen, paulsen, good book, small town
  • 21 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2