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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: emerge

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  • Of All The Scientists To Emerge From The Nineteenth And Twentieth Centuries There Is One Whose Name Is Known By Almost All Li - 1,668 words
    Of all the scientists to emerge from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries there is one whose name is known by almost all living people. While most of these do not understand this man's work, everyone knows that its impact on the world of science is astonishing. Yes, many have heard of Albert Einstein's General Theory of relativity, but few know about the intriguing life that led this scientist to discover what some have called, "The greatest single achievement of human thought." Einstein was born in Ulm, Germany on March 14, 1874. Before his first birthday, his family had moved to Munich where young Albert's father, Hermann Einstein, and uncle set up a small electro-chemical business. He w ...
    Related: emerge, nineteenth, twentieth, president roosevelt, princeton university
  • 12 Angry Men - 861 words
    12 Angry Men Twelve Angry Men Leaders are defined by two separate characteristics; those who are appointed as the leader and those with no special title that emerge as influential. In the movie Twelve Angry Men, Henry Fonda portrays a character that gains respect by others for emerging as a leader. Along with holding leadership abilities, his actions also resulted in classic communication techniques. At the beginning of the movie, it may seem that Fonda is displaying deviant behavior. The scene opens with the jurors casting guilty votes to determine a thoughtless verdict. All eleven jurors, except one (Fonda) voted guilty. As a viewer watching this movie, you have to give the character consi ...
    Related: angry, twelve angry, leadership style, deviant behavior, tension
  • 1960s - 413 words
    1960S The 1960s were the age of "sex, drugs, and rock-n-roll." People had a new outlook to life. Women began wearing shorts, skirts, and clothing they normally did not wear. Almost anything was permissive. There was a full-scale sexual revolution. Decriminalization of homosexuality was prevalent and sex education was now allowed to be taught in schools. By taking the mystery out of sex (by learning about it), it will not be detrimental to society. Television shows also started including sex in hopes of lowering STDs and the birth rate. In 1963, birth control was developed and was known as "Katy bar the door." In the early 1960s, movies, books, and plays took on taboo subjects that intrigued ...
    Related: legalized prostitution, martin luther, sex education, premarital, television
  • 65279 - 969 words
    WAR OF 1812 In this essay I will be discussing the major events and battles that took place during the War of 1812. The war was a conflict fought between the United States and Great Britain. It started in 1812 and lasted until the spring of 1815. My thesis statement is: The War of 1812 was a war that neither side won. There were four main causes for the war taking place. These were impressment, boundary problems, the Warhawks, and the British supplying the Ohio Country Indians with weapons and supplies. Henry Clay, who was the leader of the Warhawks, convinced Americans that defeating British North America, "is only a matter of marching." He knew that Britain wouldnt have any troops to spare ...
    Related: war of 1812, microsoft encarta, william henry harrison, naval, canadian
  • A Day In The Life Of Catherine Bana - 538 words
    A Day In The Life Of Catherine Bana Paringauxs article A Day in the Life of Catherine Bana, is one that is both moving and informative. Its description of the daily routine of a wife and mother from Balkoui shocks most American readers with the graphic reality of life in the impoverished nation. The article provides a vivid description of the geography of Sahel, the roles of males and females in this society, and the impact of recent international development. The families of Burknina-Faso depend on agriculture as the main source of their meager incomes. The climate and other geographical factors virtually shape the life Catherine Bana. She spends her days tending to the livestock and crops. ...
    Related: catherine, life expectancy, infant mortality, african culture, discusses
  • A Lesson From Oliver - 5,155 words
    A Lesson From Oliver by David Jorgensen Like any other morning I was up at four, the day Oliver met with his violent death. At four in the morning the grass is wet. Now, it's still wet at 6 a.m. and even at seven, and these tend to be the hours of choice for most people wishing to appreciate the phenomenon of grass wetness. But it's a tragedy of economics that, when work starts at 5 a.m., one is not afforded the same time-options for grass appreciation as members of the sane world. Nor was this tragedy confined to my having to appreciate the wet grass while in a metabolic state more suited to hibernation. Four a.m. was my only chance to absorb all of northern Ontario's summer morning treasur ...
    Related: lesson, oliver, decision making, prime minister, initiated
  • A Modest Proposal - 1,260 words
    A Modest Proposal Unlike most essays, Jonathan Swift's A Modest Proposal is written for the reader to see through what the narrator is expressing. The narrator does not want the reader to agree that the solution to overpopulation and poverty in Ireland is to eat babies, he wants the reader to see there needs to be a practical solution. By stating the advantages and objections to his proposal, using ironic words and phrases, he directs the reader not to see the apparent, but the implicit. Swift's narrative voice metaphorically compares the Irish to pigs and cows, which implies the Irish are being treated subhumanly. Although something seems one way to the narrator, Jonathan Swift wants the re ...
    Related: modest, modest proposal, proposal, harcourt brace, young children
  • A Room Of Ones Own - 325 words
    A Room Of One's Own Hundreds of years ago, an unconscious culture diseased the female population. Similar to Shakespeare's sister, women were conditioned to conform to a feminine ideology. This concept of femininity spread through out the country essentially defining the nature of a woman and robbing them of their innate sense of self. While women may have dreamed about the day when their creative spirit could be unleashed, those dreams were quickly interrupted by the powerful grasp of male dominance. By repressing women, the feminine role of dependency and obedience was maintained. In return, society's power structure became refueled and the patriarchy was perpetuated. Through time the powe ...
    Related: virginia woolf, young women, innate, discover
  • A Separate Peace: The Dying Legacy - 1,345 words
    A Separate Peace: The Dying Legacy By early 1918 in Russia, the Bolsheviks controlled only the north-western area of the Russian Empire (Petrograd and Moscow) together with the areas between and around them. Various opposition groups were formed against the Bolsheviks, under the new Provisional Government. The provisional government had proposed elections for a new assembly in late 1917; Lenin had seen that the Bolsheviks must act before this democratically elected government convened, but once in power, he allowed the elections to proceed. In the November 1917 polls, Bolshevik candidates won just under 25 per cent of the vote, while the moderate socialists polled over 40 per cent. Lenin sen ...
    Related: legacy, separate peace, soviet socialist, power relations, formally
  • A Short History Of Antisemitism In Germany - 779 words
    A Short History of Anti-Semitism in Germany A Short History of Anti-Semitism in Germany The Second World War has left an unmistakable impression on the whole of Europe that will never be forgotten. Whether visible to the naked eye, or hidden in the consciousness of its people, the war has scarred Europe indelibly. Historically, the foremost recognizable perpetration against Europeans was Adolf Hitlers "Final Solution to the Jewish question". This sophisticated operation of systematic mass execution was calculated, organized, and carried out with such horrifying efficiency that only a madman could have been responsible for such an act, and Hitler was indeed mad. However, Anti-Semitism had bee ...
    Related: antisemitism, german history, germany, history, short history
  • Advances In Medicine - 1,318 words
    Advances In Medicine As the history of medicine has evolved, a number of trends and prevailing opinions have swept the profession. One of the most subtle, and yet most revealing results of these sweeping trends manifests itself by altering the tone in medical conversations and dialogues, often available to the non-medical person in the form of texts and literature. A relatively current example appears in the form of Perri Klass A Not Entirely Benign Procedure, a text dedicated to the experiences of the author at Harvard Medical School. Published in 1987, Klass work offers an interesting, if not shocking comparison to Philippe Pinels The Clinical Training of Doctors, an article published in 1 ...
    Related: medicine, modern medicine, personal perspective, patient care, enthusiasm
  • Adventures Of Huck Finn - 1,195 words
    ... is casual dialogue ironically, as a was to underscore the chilling truth about the old south, that it was a society where perfectly "nice" people didn't consider the death of a black person worth their notice. Because of his upbringing, the boy starts out that slavery is part of the natural order; but as the story unfolds he wrestles with his conscience, and when the crucial moment comes he decides he will be damned to the flames of hell rather than betray his black friend. And Jim, as Twain presents him, is hardly a caricature. Rather, he is the moral center of the book, a man of courage and nobility, who risks his freedom risks his life -- for the sake of his friend Huck. (Swalden 2) ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, finn, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn
  • Aerodynamics Of Planes - 1,142 words
    Aerodynamics Of Planes Ever since I was little I was amazed at the ability for a machine to fly. I have always wanted to explore ideas of flight and be able to actually fly. I think I may have found my childhood fantasy in the world of aeronautical engineering. The object of my paper is to give me more insight on my future career as an aeronautical engineer. This paper was also to give me ideas of the physics of flight and be to apply those physics of flight to compete in a high school competition. History of Flight The history of flying dates back as early as the fifteenth century. A Renaissance man named Leonardo da Vinci introduced a flying machine known as the ornithopter. Da Vinci propo ...
    Related: aerodynamics, u.s. military, flying machines, space shuttle, wing
  • African Widow Bird - 1,437 words
    African Widow Bird Finding good day care can certainly pose a problem these days, unless, of course, you're an African widow bird. When it comes time for a female widow bird to lay her eggs, she simply locates the nest of a nearby Estrildid finch and surreptitiously drops the eggs inside. That's the last the widow bird ever sees of her offspring. But not to worry, because the Estrildid finch will take devoted care of the abandoned birds as if they were her own. And who's to tell the difference? Though adult widow birds and Estrildid finches don't look at all alike, their eggs do. Not only that, baby widow birds are dead ringers for Estrildid finch chicks, both having the same colouration and ...
    Related: african, bird, widow, sri lanka, sea anemones
  • Airline Safety Bill 2001 - 1,711 words
    Airline Safety Bill (2001) Introduction (Background of Actors): There are quite a few actors in respect to interest groups and domestic airline safety. The interest groups come from varying backgrounds of business, labor, government and public interest. The actors that we are focused on are the domestic airline companies, the aerospace industry, private security firms, various labor groups, National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT), Congress, The World Conference on Transportation Research Society (WCTRS) and the American people. Business Sector The business sector plays a major role in our domestic airline safe ...
    Related: airline, airline industry, national transportation safety board, safety regulations, transportation safety board
  • Alaskan Aviation - 1,481 words
    ... made a timed distance run with a stopwatch and compass, and dropped bombs on an unseen target. This became known as dead reckoning bombing or "DR" runs. Eareckson also began using time-delayed fuses on his bombs that prevented the bombs from exploding under the low flying aircraft that had just dropped its ordnance (Garfield 106). His experiences in Alaska were to contribute significantly to the air war in the Pacific. Having flown in the worst weather imaginable, Col. Eareckson was more than capable of handling a few enemy fighters. Another unique aspect of the war in Alaska was the Lend -Lease program. The Lend- Lease program was established to send supplies and equipment to the embat ...
    Related: alaskan, aviation, international airport, ozone layer, elmer
  • Alcohol - 654 words
    Alcohol Alcohol Alcohol is a drug, but unlike most of the other drugs, it is socially accepted and is legal. Alcohol is bad for you and does have long term affects associated with it. Such as the long addiction to it, effects on the body, and the social interaction effects. Alcohol, and alcoholism is common in America, but drinking is more common around kids. Social drinking, a term kids and drinkers have come accustom to, is defined by one standard drink per hour, and no more than 3 per day, but some people just socialize around people that drink as heavily as they do and confuse that for social drinking. Addiction to alcohol can be acquired easily if not careful, binge drinking and family ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol consumption, binge drinking, drunk driving, drugs
  • Alcoholism - 2,059 words
    Alcoholism alcoholism Definitions and causal factors of alcoholism Alcoholism consists of a repetitive intake of alcoholic beverages to an extent that the drinker is harmed. The harm may be physical or mental; it may also be social or economic. Implicit in the conception of alcoholism as a disease is the idea that the person experiencing repeated or long-lasting injury from his drinking would alter his behaviour if he could. His failure to do so shows that he cannot help himself, that he has lost control over drinking. This conception incorporates the idea of addiction or dependence. Formal definitions of alcoholism vary according to the point of view of the definer. A simplistic, old-fashio ...
    Related: alcoholism, affective disorder, social factors, world war ii, relation
  • Allegory Of Cave Not Essaylots Of Info - 2,868 words
    ... SS. HE COULD NOT UNDER THESE CIRCUMSTANCES COMPETE VERY EFFECTIVELY WITH THE OTHER PRISONERS IN MAKING OUT THE SHADOWS ON THE WALL. WHILE HIS EYESIGHT WAS STILL DIM AND UNSTEADY, THOSE WHO HAD THEIR PERMANENT RESIDENCE IN THE DARKNESS COULD WIN EVERY ROUND OF COMPETITION WITH HIM. THEY WOULD AT FIRST FIND THIS SITUATION VERY AMUSING AND WOULD TAUNT HIM BY SAYING THAT HIS SIGHT WAS PERFECTLY ALL RIGHT BEFORE HE WENT UP OUT OF THE CAVE AND THAT NOW HE HAS RETURNED WITH HIS SIGHT RUINED. THEIR CONCLUSION WOULD BE THAT IT IS NOT WORTH TRYING TO GO UP OUT OF THE CAVE. INDEED, SAYS PLATO IF THEY COULD LAY HANDS ON THE MAN WHO WAS TRYING TO SET THEM FREE AND LEAD THEM UP THEY WOULD KILL HIM. MO ...
    Related: allegory, allegory of the cave, cave, info, human beings
  • American Identity - 1,828 words
    American Identity The American Identity It can strongly be argued, as it has for many years, whether or not an American identity ever occurred between 1776 and 1861. The answer to this question really depends on your definition of what an identity consists of. An identity is the sameness in all that constitutes the objective reality of a thing; oneness. The thirteen colonies tried hard to find a sense of themselves as a nation even before they had a nation. Nationality became an American invention (notes). To find an identity the thirteen colonies created a flag, symbols of nationality (bald eagle, pluribus Unum), and they established national heroes (George Washington). Next they began to s ...
    Related: american, american identity, national identity, huckleberry finn, missouri compromise
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