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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: american children

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  • Abortion And Prolife - 1,874 words
    ... before as well as after, birth" (Wilke 94). The unborn are beginning to gain more rights. From state to state, legal rights of an unborn child can mean the difference between the death of a fetus being a criminal act to being just a matter of legal consequence. Mothers are now starting to be prosecuted for harming their babies through drug and alcohol abuse. Drunk drivers are also being punished in some states for injuring fetuses. Accidents like these would have gone without punishment up until a few years ago. Almost half of the states, such as Delaware, do not consider the killing of a fetus as murder unless the child is born and then dies (USA Today). Patricia Bast Lyman added to th ...
    Related: abortion, the bible, pregnant woman, hippocratic oath, american
  • Adhd - 931 words
    Adhd Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common mental disorders among children. About 3 percent to 5 percent of American children are affected by this disorder. This disorder is commonly mis-diagnosed in children who are very hyperactive, assuming that very hyperactive kids have this disorder. In this paper I plan to discuss ideas such as: the symptoms, theories of causation, risks, and how this disorder is looked at and treated. There are signs that a child may be affected by ADHD, which are very noticeable in some cases. Some of the physical symptoms that are involved include hyperactivity, inattention, and impulsitiv ...
    Related: adhd, television watching, hyperactivity disorder, food additives, complicated
  • Adult Illiteracy - 3,413 words
    Adult Illiteracy Learning to read is like learning to drive a car. You take lessons and learn the mechanics and the rules of the road. After a few weeks you have learned how to drive, how to stop, how to shift gears, how to park, and how to signal. You have also learned to stop at a red light and understand road signs. When you are ready, you take a road test, and if you pass, you can drive. Phonics-first works the same way. The child learns the mechanics of reading, and when he's through, he can read. Look and say works differently. The child is taught to read before he has learned the mechanics the sounds of the letters. It is like learning to drive by starting your car and driving ahead. ...
    Related: adult, adult literacy, illiteracy, attention deficit, young people
  • Adventures - 1,850 words
    ... oint. They gave Huck 40 dollars in gold, but put it on a piece of wood so that they would not have to expose themselves to the disease. The feud between the Granger fords and the Shaped sons is a venue for many of the themes in Huck Finn( Compton`s Encyclopedia).While everyone around her thought she was very gifted, her poems are amateurish and overly depressing. This is Twain's belief about the romantics in general. Twain ridicules the honor system that binds the two families to slaughter each other for an act that no one can remember. He points to their hypocrisy in commenting favorably on a sermon of brotherly love, with their guns in hand. This feud adds to Huck's distaste for societ ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, the adventures of huckleberry finn, luther king, southern society, mistaken
  • Affirmative Action - 1,719 words
    Affirmative Action Affirmative action was established as part of society's efforts to address continuing problems of discrimination; the empirical evidence presented in the preceding chapter indicates that it has had some positive impact on remedying the effects of discrimination. Whether such discrimination lingers today is a central element of an analysis of affirmative action. The conclusion is clear: discrimination and exclusion remain all too common. 4.1. Evidence of Continuing Discrimination There has been undeniable progress in many areas. Nevertheless, the evidence is overwhelming that the problems affirmative action seeks to address -- widespread discrimination and exclusion and the ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, american women, high school, management
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder - 1,225 words
    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Understanding the Behavioral Disorder: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Imagine living in a fast-moving kaleidoscope, where sounds, images, and thoughts are constantly shifting. Feeling easily bored, yet helpless to keep your mind on tasks you need to complete. Distracted by unimportant sights and sounds, your mind drives you from one thought or activity to the next. Perhaps you are so wrapped up in a collage of thoughts and images that you don't notice when someone speaks to you. "Tommy can't sit still. He is disruptive at school with his constant talking and clowning around. He leaves the classroom without the teacher's permission. Al ...
    Related: attention deficit, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, deficit, deficit hyperactivity, disorder, hyperactivity, hyperactivity disorder
  • Banning Books - 1,257 words
    Banning Books Banning Books Our freedom is under attack! Censorship is clearly an attack on our freedom. There are a number of books that are banned or challenged that are great books, such as The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. These books are classics. Banning these books robs students of great literature. Censorship of books in secondary schools should not be allowed. The list of books that have been banned completely in many schools across the nation is expansive, and so are the reasons that parents and schoolboards give for banning these books. Advocates of literary censorship say that it's best for the students. Opponents say that ...
    Related: banned books, banning, great books, small group, main argument
  • Biligual Education - 1,884 words
    ... t unassailable. In their zeal to protect the program from any challenges, CABE (California Association of Bilingual Education), its ardent supporters had also consistently opposed any attempts to reform it. Californias powerful teachers unions (one of the Democratic Partys strongest constituencies) made the issue a mainstay of that states liberal agenda. Because activists had early on identified bilingual education as the primary Latino civil rights issue, the equivalent of what busing was to blacks, foes and doubters of the program were routinely branded as racists. Unfortunately, this defensive posture insured that bilingual lobbyists were more concerned with preserving the program tha ...
    Related: bilingual education, education system, english speaking, high school, coastal
  • Child Abluse - 1,980 words
    Child Abluse 1 What is Child Abuse? By definition, child abuse is the deliberate and willful injury of a child by a caretaker hitting, beating with an object, slamming against a wall, even killing. It involves active, hostile, aggressive treatment. The key word in the definition of child abuse is deliberate. Why would anyone physically harm a child? The physical destruction of a child is the extreme reaction of parents to the stress of having children. Most people are not aware of the fact that deliberately hitting a child is considered a felony in all fifty states. Abuse of children is more common than most people realize. At least one out of five adult women and one out of every ten adult ...
    Related: child abuse, child pornography, child sexual abuse, prevent child abuse, young child
  • Child Abuse - 550 words
    Child Abuse Child Abuse Child Abuse is behavior by and adult that harms a childs physical, mental, or emotional health and development. Some types of child abuse are neglect, and physical abuse. An example of neglect would be medical neglect. This is where the child does not get the proper medical attention needed. Some examples of physical abuse would be sexual and physiological. The American Humane Society estimates that nearly 34 out of every 1,000 American children are abused in some way. Most children are too afraid to admit they have been abused; in fact, less than 20 percent of the cases reported were reported by the child being abused. The number one cause of child abuse is stress. T ...
    Related: abuse, child abuse, physical abuse, american children, single parent
  • Comparison Between American And Indain Culture - 1,001 words
    Comparison Between American And Indain Culture Comparison Between American and Indian Culture and Values There are a lot of differences between American and Indian culture and values. As we know today, the American culture is a mixture of different cultures. India, on the other hand, has its own culture and values. I would like to introduce the culture and value differences between these two countries. Americans believe that they can really control their future. They are more specific to plan things. Indian people, however, believe that everything goes by Gods will. They make short term plans. However, Americans always like to plan things ahead. They think they can/should control and dominat ...
    Related: american, american children, american culture, american people, comparison, indian culture, western culture
  • Ebonics - 1,323 words
    Ebonics Ebonics The United States is filled with many different ethnicities, cultures, customs, languages, etc. Supposedly, our public schools are equipped with classes, teachers, curriculums and materials in order to educate that part of the student population whose first language is something other than the English language. Bilingual classes, transitional classes, ESL classes are just a few of the programs that have been developed to instruct non-English speaking students in order for them to acquire the English language. However, there has been a language use among African American students; language that has not been examined closely nor acknowledged until recently. Ebonics is classifie ...
    Related: ebonics, special education, equal protection, public schools, edition
  • Educating Hispanic Students - 1,063 words
    Educating Hispanic Students Education is the key to individual opportunity, the strength of our economy, and the vitality of our democracy. In the 21st century, this nation cannot afford to leave anyone behind. While the academic achievement and educational attainment of Hispanic Americans has been moving in the right direction, untenable gaps still exist between Hispanic students and their counterparts in the areas of early childhood education, learning English, academic achievement, and high school and college completion. Hispanics will represent more than one-quarter of school-age children in the United States by 2025. These children are more likely than others to be educationally and eco ...
    Related: college students, educating, female students, hispanic, hispanic students, minority students, school students
  • Education In The 1800s - 1,238 words
    ... ake us love and esteem them, to educate us when young, and to take care of us when grown up, to advise, to counsel us, to render our lives easy and agreeable; these are the duties of women at all times.(Hunt 77) During the Civil War, schooling was disrupted for many whites, and many schools, especially in the south, were destroyed. (Cremin 316) During the first half of the nineteenth century, the percentage of while children enrolled in school increased dramatically. The practice spread throughout the Midwest, and public schooling existed in the south, but only until the end of the nineteenth century. Aggregate national school enrollment rates for whites between the age of five and ninet ...
    Related: american education, moral education, philosophy of education, public education, public schooling
  • Educational Philosophy - 761 words
    Educational Philosophy Throughout the years the topic of an American public education has been a very controversial subject. Since the time of the early Massachusetts Bay Colony, many have been divided on the role, if any, the government should play in educating America's children. There has also been debate on the type of education American children, and teachers should have. Although, there has been tremendous progress in creating an "ideal public education", there is still an ever-evolving need for change in America's public educational system. This paper strives to focus on this matter. First, it will look at the history of American education, beginning with colonial America to the prese ...
    Related: educational, educational philosophy, educational system, philosophy, philosophy of education
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - 1,768 words
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Preventable Birth Defect If women didnt drink anymore during pregnancy, there would never be another baby born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Fetal Alcohol Effect (McCuen 33). This is a very powerful statement. It is also a very simple cure for an alarmingly high birth defect that all women have the power to stop. Every year more than 40,000 American children are born with defects because their mother drank alcohol while pregnant (McCuen 34). That is 1 to 3 per 1,000 live births (McCuen 31). Many of these cases go undiagnosed It is also the number one cause of mental retardation in the United States, and one of the three leading causes of bir ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol dependency, alcohol syndrome, drink alcohol, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome
  • Genomics - 1,348 words
    Genomics When one suggests that a behavior is determined genetically, then one horribly oversimplifies the situation, and negates the importance of culture and free will in determining how a person behaves. One behavior that has gained large-scale acceptance as having a partial genetic cause is that of alcoholism. This genetic cause I expressed in terms of risk factor. It has often been noted that the children of alcoholics are more at risk of becoming addicted to alcohol than are other children. in the last five or so years, technique arising from the Human Genome Project have made it possible to sequence human genes and actually try to pinpoint the locus of the genes associated with alcoho ...
    Related: genomics, native american, more prone, identical twins, acceptance
  • How Do Psychologists Attempt To Explain The Origins Of Prejudice - 1,390 words
    How Do Psychologists Attempt To Explain The Origins Of Prejudice? HOW DO PSYCHOLOGISTS ATTEMPT TO EXPLAIN THE ORIGINS OF PREJUDICE? DO THEY OFFER SOCIETY ANY HOPE THAT IT MAY BE REDUCED? BY JON SALECLEMENTS. Ethnocentrism is the tendency to assume that one's culture or way of life is superior to all others. Prejudice is a negative attitude toward an entire category of individuals. Discrimination is behaviour that excludes all members of a group from certain rights, opportunities or privileges. A range of international events have recently focused attention on the issue of prejudice; increasing ethno-nationalistic tensions in former Eastern block countries, racial conflict in the Middle East, ...
    Related: prejudice, psychologists, psychodynamic approach, individual differences, reduction
  • Japanese Immigrants And The Following Generations Had To Endure - 995 words
    Japanese immigrants and the following generations had to endure discrimination, racism, and prejudice from white Americans. They were first viewed as economic competition. The Japanese Americans were then forced into internment camps simply because of the whites fear and paranoia. The Japanese first began to immigrate to the United States in 1868. At first they came in small numbers. US Census records show only 55 in 1870 and 2,039 in 1890. After that, they came in much greater numbers, reaching 24,000 in 1900, 72,000 in 1910, and 111,000 in 1920.(Parrillo,287) Most settled in the western states.(Klimova,1) Many families in Japan followed the practice of primogeniture, which is when the elde ...
    Related: endure, japanese, japanese american, west coast, racial bias
  • Jonathan Kozol, Savage Inequalities - 1,025 words
    Jonathan Kozol, Savage Inequalities The new millennium brings many advances in our childrens learning. The introduction of technology and breakthrough teaching methods display a positive outlook for the educational system our children count on. Yet, this optimistic view is believed by many to be looked at through rose-colored glasses. Jonathan Kozol's Savage Inequalities: Children in America's Schools looks at the ways the government, the society, and the educational system fail poor children, especially poor African-American children, in the United States. Kozol's work, which examines six cities where he finds common problems, illustrates the key shortcomings that work against the education ...
    Related: jonathan, jonathan kozol, savage, savage inequalities, san antonio
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