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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: electoral college

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  • Electoral College - 1,993 words
    Electoral College Who is really voting, the people or the selected few. The recent election involving Bush and Gore has heated up a fifty year old debate. The debate is about whether the Electoral College is still an effective system considering the circumstances the United States now faces compared to when it was created by the founding fathers. The Electoral College is an outdated system of election that misrepresents the people of the United States today. The college was created in a time where communication was limited. Treason, tyranny, and oppression from foreign countries were still a serious threat. In order to protect the people and the institution of America, the government created ...
    Related: electoral, electoral college, electoral system, republican party, problems faced
  • Electoral College - 1,801 words
    Electoral College Electoral College The Electoral College, friend or foe? The answer behind this question is in the minds of those that understand it. Whether it be a "friend" or a "foe" there will always be opposing sides and a controversial verse. Since the political circumstance of today, the Electoral College seems to be the topic in every conversation and the thesis to every essay. The uncontrollable desire to know the truth behind the mystery is stirring in the minds of the people in the United States of America. With the 2000 Elections underway sides are beginning to be taken among the people. Many oppose the Electoral College because of the fact that unknowing electors choose their l ...
    Related: college system, electoral, electoral college, founding fathers, controversial issue
  • Electoral College - 663 words
    Electoral College The Electoral College is the collective name for the electors who choose the president and vice president of the United States. The electoral system was developed by the drafters of the Constitution, to entrust the responsibility to people whose choice would be unaffected by partisan politics. In Article II, Section 1, of the Constitution, the method of selecting electors is delegated to the separate state legislatures. When a voter chooses a candidate in a presidential election that person is not directly voting for that specific candidate. The voter is actually voting for the electors in their state to vote for that candidate. Each state is allotted a certain number of el ...
    Related: electoral, electoral college, electoral system, united states of america, south dakota
  • Electoral College - 565 words
    Electoral College The Electoral College has been used to elect the President since the beginnings of the United States. In the two hundred some odd years of history, there have been instances when the college did not work. There have been many ideas that have floated around about fixing the problem with the electorate. Then again, there are many plusses to using the Electoral College system. In an election, the President is elected not by the popular vote, but by the votes of the electorates. The electorates are representative of each state. There are a number of electorates per state equal to the amount of persons in both the House of Representatives, and the Senate. The District of Columbi ...
    Related: college system, electoral, electoral college, electoral system, more important
  • Electoral College - 770 words
    Electoral College The framer's intent of setting up the American Government will never be know for sure, but it is gathered that they preferred a republic over a democracy. In the constitutional convention the drafters had to decide how much power they would entrust with the people of the United States, and how much should be controlled by representatives. They chose to have Congress Make the laws, and congress would be selected directly by the people. But another branch of government, the executive branch, needed a sole president and the framers had to decide how to choose this president. They chose from three main systems: elect the president by congress, the people, or electors. The elect ...
    Related: college system, electoral, electoral college, american government, congressional district
  • Electoral College - 1,229 words
    Electoral College The Electoral CollegeToday Why is it that in the United States the words politics and politician has associations that are uncharacteristically negative for our countrys leaders? Today, Americas politicians have turned into greedy executives. The mix of politics and business is driving our country away from the principles that our founding fathers set fourth. Why is our forty-third president in office when the majority of Americans voted for a different candidate? An election that gives the people the choice without regard to state lines of a president by a majority would cure some of the current problems of the Electoral College. We have a president that bullied his way in ...
    Related: college system, electoral, electoral college, electoral politics, electoral system
  • Electoral College System - 706 words
    Electoral College System After the last presidential election, which is still underway apparently, there is much controversy over what should happen to the Electoral College system. There are people who say that the Electoral College is good but should be modified to meet the needs of the modern world. There are those who say that the Electoral College system is too outdated to be modified and should be entirely eliminated. Finally there are those who say that it is has stood the test of time and is still the best system for our country. The original framers of the constitution obviously preferred the electoral system to a direct popular election. The argument that historians give for this i ...
    Related: college system, electoral, electoral college, electoral system, third party
  • History Of Electoral College - 951 words
    History Of Electoral College HISTORY OF THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE The Electoral College is the name for the electors who nominally choose the president and vice president of the United States. Each of the states receives a certain number of electors, which is determined by the total number of senators and representatives it sends to the U.S. Congress. Therefore, each state has at least 3 electors. The Electoral College was devised by the Framers of the Constitution as a procedure to elect the president by the people, at least indirectly. The framers came up with this procedure for many reasons. Such reasons included the lack of information to make a good choice by the people and it was also a wa ...
    Related: electoral, electoral college, history, state legislature, house of representatives
  • Origins And History Of The Electoral College - 3,581 words
    ... design and experience. As it now operates: Each State is allocated a number of Electors equal to the number of its U.S. Senators (always 2) plus the number of its U.S. Representatives (which may change each decade according to the size of each States population as determined in the Census). The political parties (or independent candidates) in each State submit to the States chief election official a list of individuals pledged to their candidate for president and equal in number to the States electoral vote. Usually, the major political parties select these individuals either in their State party conventions or through appointment by their State party leaders while third parties and inde ...
    Related: american history, college system, electoral, electoral college, history
  • The Electoral College - 1,032 words
    The Electoral College When the Constitutional Convention gathered in 1784 they had the difficult task of determining how our government should be assembled and what systems we should use to elect them. They quickly decided congress should have the powers to pass laws and the people should elect these people to ensure they are following the will of the people. But who should elect the president? Congress was the initial choice of most of the framers, but then they realized they first dilemma; by having congress elect the president, he would be loyal only to congress and not the people. The second and most logically thought was to have the people elect the president. However, this too was a pr ...
    Related: college system, electoral, electoral college, republican party, constitutional convention
  • The Electoral College - 976 words
    ... This power of the smaller states was especially evident during this year's election. For the first time in many years, the candidates knew that the election would be close. Because of this, presidential and vice-presidential candidates visited smaller states in record numbers. For example, Oregon, with its 7 Electoral votes had 17 visits from these candidates during this election. This more than tripled the number of visits during the 1996 presidential race and reinforced the importance of smaller states having the Electoral College. The third, and last purpose, for the Electoral College was that the framers did not trust the "mob." (Natapoff). They believed that a large electorate could ...
    Related: college system, electoral, electoral college, vice presidential, nazi germany
  • The Electoral College - 206 words
    The Electoral College The History of the Electoral College The electoral college was developed by the framers of the constitution. This proved to be more difficult than they anticipated. The founding fathers faced the difficult question of how to elect a president in a nation that: was composed of thirteen large and small states, contained only 4,000,000 people spread up and down the Atlantic seaboard barely connected by transportaion so national campag They were not willing to give the choice of president to the average citizen. Instead, they divised a group of select citizens called electors-the Electoral College-should decide the president. Candidate that received the highest number of vo ...
    Related: electoral, electoral college, thomas jefferson, vice president, candidate
  • The Electoral College - 968 words
    The Electoral College A major conflict concerning the electoral college lingers in America. The Constitutional Convention created the college in 1789 in hopes that it would be an adequate system (MacBride 29). The electoral college consists of senators and representatives who cast their votes for the state they represent. Those who feel that the college should remain as it is believe that the American people are too uninformed about election issues to vote. The argument for the modification of the college maintains that the people are not actually electing the president, but the larger states are. Ultimately, the majority of the United States citizens support the elimination of an electoral ...
    Related: college system, electoral, electoral college, electoral system, constitutional convention
  • The Electoral College System Is One Which Is Criticized Often In Most Of The Countries In The - 849 words
    The electoral college system is one which is criticized often. In most of the countries in the world their leader is chosen by popular vote. This was true even in communist countries, although many times only one candidate runs sometime. This system of popular vote is not used in the United States, the country that is supposed to be the most democratic. The Electoral College, the constitutional system for the election of the president and vice president of the United States. It is the collective name for a group of electors, nominated by political parties within the states and popularly elected, who meet to vote for those two offices. Each party within a state selects a slate of electors num ...
    Related: college system, criticized, electoral, electoral college, john f kennedy
  • The Impact Of Eliminating The Electoral College - 512 words
    The Impact of Eliminating the Electoral College The Impact of Eliminating the Electoral College The Electoral College is a very large part of determining which candidate for presidency will become the next Chief Executive of the United States of America. Often times, it is the only important factor in this decision, with the popular vote accounting for considerably less. The Electoral College is a long-standing tradition in the history of the United States, despite the fact that the idea of its being eliminated has been tossed around by many. Both Republicans and Democrats are opposed to this idea, due to the consequences of its removal. One of these consequences would be an election based s ...
    Related: college system, electoral, electoral college, eliminating, party system
  • A More Perfect Union: - 1,022 words
    ... e power to regulate trade, the southern states would be nothing more than overseers for the Northern States. On August 21 the debate over the issue of commerce became very closely linked to another explosive issue--slavery. When Martin of Maryland proposed a tax on slave importation, the convention was thrust into a strident discussion of the institution of slavery and its moral and economic relationship to the new government. Rutledge of South Carolina, asserting that slavery had nothing at all to do with morality, declared, Interest alone is the governing principle with nations. Sherman of Connecticut was for dropping the tender issue altogether before it jeopardized the convention. Ma ...
    Related: more perfect union, articles of confederation, bill of rights, northern states, mason
  • Al Gore And George W Bush - 406 words
    Al Gore And George W. Bush The 2000 Presidential election between Vice-President Al Gore and Texas Governor George W. Bush was and still is a close campaign. This race has still not ended due to the closeness in the state of Florida primarily and the state of Oregon. Florida which contains 25 electoral college votes was and still is to close to call, which means that the race is close as of last time that I had checked the race was only separated by about 1800 votes. The state of Oregon only contains seven Electoral College votes so this is not that important to the outcome of the election because the Electoral College votes are 260 for Gore and 246 for Bush and 270 are needed to win. In the ...
    Related: bush, george w. bush, gore, electoral college, texas governor
  • America The Unusuak And Wrong - 1,899 words
    America The Unusuak And Wrong Different people from all different walks of life founded America. Many of these people came to America as now know it, for many reason. One of these reasons being that they felt their government was corrupt, harsh, unfair or just to powerful in there every day lives. So naturally when America created its government, it was created in such a way, to prevent tyranny, high taxation, and ensure personal freedoms. Author John W. Kingdon feels that the government the founders created is so fragmented and our ideology of individualism and anti-government (small government) is now causing more harms then good. What do you think? Do you feel that the U.S. Government is ...
    Related: america, house of representatives, legislative branch, house speaker, lock
  • Analyis Of English Only Law Essays Pro Vs Con - 1,023 words
    Analyis Of English Only Law Essays -- Pro Vs Con Let's play a game of "WHAT IF?" However, instead of using childish concerns as the focus of our game, let us concentrate on socio-politcal issues. As a matter of fact, we have been playing a game of "WHAT IF?" throughout the entire semester. For instance, WHAT would have happened IF the constitutional congress had not merged the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plan? Or, WHAT would happen if the delegates to the electoral college went against the grain and decided to cast their votes for whomever they saw fit? In fact, one big example of the "WHAT IF?" game would be the reflection papers assigned this semester. The purpose of these papers was ...
    Related: analyis, learn english, cultural awareness, negative effect, mainstream
  • Andrew Jackson - 1,886 words
    Andrew Jackson The year was 1824. The election of this year was very unusual because of the number of candidates running for president. One of the candidates was Andrew Jackson, or Old Hickory as they called him, a general that had won the Battle of New Orleans(which was a battle not needed) in the War of 1812. Jackson became a hero after this war, and it would bring him all the way to the presidency. Another one of the candidates was John Quincy Adams. The son of John Adams, the second president of the United States, Adams was a excellent debator from New England. He was the only candidate from the NorthEast. The two other candidates were William Crawford and Henry Clay. Crawford, the secre ...
    Related: andrew, andrew jackson, jackson, electoral college, federal funds
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