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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: egyptian culture

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  • He Westward Spread Of Inca And Egyptian Culture - 1,271 words
    ... e Pacific that support the theory of contact between the peoples of the Polynesian islands and the Inca culture. Peruvians contend that a race from the North who lived on Lake Titicaca fled to the west on great rafts made of balsa. Their leader's name was Kon-Tiki (Kon-Tiki 19). Furthermore, the Polynesians contend that they are descendants of a group that had come across the sea from a land in the east which was scorched by the sun (Kon-Tiki 19). The leader of this legendary group- Tiki; who was said to be a direct scion of the sun god. It is said, Tiki, he was both god and chief. It was Tiki who brought my ancestors to these islands where we live now. Before that, we lived in a big cou ...
    Related: egyptian, egyptian culture, inca, westward, extra terrestrial
  • The Westward Spread Of Inca And Egyptian Culture - 264 words
    The Westward Spread Of Inca and Egyptian Culture The second half of the twentieth century has seen many changes in theories concerning the mode of colonization of the islands of Micronesia, and the rise of the Inca Empire, with it's striking similarities to Egypt. In the past, it has been suggested that Asians had worked their way through the Pacific, over a period of thousands of years. It was believed that each island group had formed independently, and that the residents, while they were of the same race, had totally different cultures. Since the 1940's, however, these views have been changing. It is now accepted by many scholars that early Egyptians sailed as far west as South America, i ...
    Related: egyptian, egyptian culture, inca, inca empire, westward
  • A History Of Christianity In Egypt - 1,119 words
    A History of Christianity in Egypt A History of Christianity in Egypt The history of Christianity in Egypt dates back verily to the beginnings of Christianity itself. Many Christians hold that Christianity was brought to Egypt by the Apostle Saint Mark in the early part of the first century AD. Eusebius, Bishop of Caesarea, in his Ecclesiastic History states that Saint Mark first came to Egypt between the first and third year of the reign of Emperor Claudius, which would make it sometime between AD 41 and 44, and that he returned to Alexandria some twenty years later to preach and evangelize. Saint Mark's first convert in Alexandria was Anianus, a shoemaker who later was consecrated a bishop ...
    Related: christianity, egypt, history, upper egypt, emperor constantine
  • Alexander The Great - 618 words
    Alexander The Great Who is Great? In history there are few people who can be termed Great and even fewer who deserve to be called so. Alexander, the son of King Phillip of the Macedonians, was one of these truly Great people. He not merely ruled the largest know empire, was declared a God, lead his troops in battle, and conquered foreign cities, his first being at the age of sixteen, but he did it all within a thirteen year time period. Not only did he do all of this, but also it was done within thirteen years. When Alexander became the new King of Macedonia, many believed him to be to young to rule. They felt that he didnt have the experience needed to be their new leader. They had no way o ...
    Related: alexander, alexander the great, first great, ninth edition, king phillip
  • Ancient Egypt - 1,076 words
    Ancient Egypt Ancient Egypt The term culture is one that can be defined in many ways. Culture is defined as: the ideas, activities, and ways of behaving that are special to a country, people, or region. Museums such as the Field Museum attempt to give its visitors a sense of the culture and history of different countries, as well as a sense of US culture and history. In this quest however, museums often focus on one specific nature of the culture [of a country] and lose sight of the whole picture - the entire culture. After all, the US culture is primarily a capitalistic one, and museums - in addition to their quest to educate the American public - overemphasize what they feel is the most in ...
    Related: ancient egypt, ancient egyptians, egypt, egyptian culture, different countries
  • Ancient Egypt - 1,067 words
    ... ancient Egyptians, there were no plaques having as extensive information as in the pyramid. Of the few plaques that were in the daily life exhibit, they consisted of only the name of the object and the date that it was presumed to come from. Information maybe have been extracted from the five feet tall walls that were scattered through out the small exhibit: one of such walls shows a cartoon like scene of a man kneeling and holding up a cup. In front of him was a man holding a pitcher filled with some liquid. In between the men was a little description of the scene that said something to the extent of: 'the man kneeling is at a bar and has been drinking. He is drunk and is thirsty for m ...
    Related: ancient egypt, ancient egyptians, egypt, after life, daily life
  • Ancient Egypt - 1,607 words
    Ancient Egypt Between 3100 and 332 B.C was the rise and climax of one of the richest and oldest ancient civilizations. Its lifeline was the Nile river in the Nile valley. Here, Egyptian dynasties ruled from the first cataract of the Nile to the Mediterranean Sea. At the its height it ruled an empire that reached from Syria in the east to Nubia in the south. In this report I will be covering the Archaic Period, the Old Kingdom, the Middle Kingdom the New Kingdom and The Late Period or 3100-332 B.C. Archaic Period: 3100 B.C to 2750 B.C There long history began with there first King who began the first Egyptian dynasty. In 3100 B.C Pharaoh Menes united upper and lower Egypt. Making Egypts first ...
    Related: ancient civilizations, ancient egypt, egypt, lower egypt, upper egypt
  • Art Egyptian - 1,790 words
    Art- Egyptian Fragment Of a Wall Relief As I entered the upper Egyptian gallery at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology I noticed a women giving a lecture to a small group concerning some of the monuments in the gallery. Lucky enough, I got a chance to catch the end of her lecture, and coincidentally it was about this piece entitled Fragment of a Wall Relief. This particular piece is from the Amarna period or 18th dynasty of ancient Egypt, dating from about 1367-1350 BCE. I picked this piece specifically because of the period in which it derives. The armana period has boggled me ever since we learned about it in class. In this paper I hope to uncover the hist ...
    Related: egyptian, egyptian art, egyptian culture, lower egypt, small group
  • Cats - 1,236 words
    Cats Many people today have pets for pleasure and companionship. Nearly any animal can be a pet, such as hamsters, rabbits, birds, fish, frogs, horses, and even cats and dogs. Besides being a loving companion, pets serve many other purposes as in protecting homes, destroying vermin, and providing a means of transportation. The elderly and the childless couples can rely on a pet as an emotional outlet. In addition, pets can be kept for their beauty, rarity, or for the beautiful sounds that birds can make. Today pets are usually purchased from breeders, pet shops, or animal shelters rather then individually captured and tamed. All pets were made domestic, including cats. Cats are the second mo ...
    Related: black cat, cats, food sources, world today, indian
  • Creating The Past - 1,244 words
    Creating the Past Ancient Egyptians and Norsemen along with all other cultures believe that the world and all that lies there in was created by a Supreme Being or force. For most people faith alone is not enough to base their very existence on; people want to know why, how, and all of the details. It is only human nature for a person to be curious and want to know why something happened the way it did. Curiosity is the reason the Egyptians and Norsemen began to write or create myths and deities. Authors since the beginning of time have written based on the inspiration of their lives and surroundings, including the Egyptians and Norsemen. Ancient Egyptian and Norse creation mythologies and de ...
    Related: ancient egypt, life after death, egyptian culture, dependent, surprising
  • Creating The Past - 1,227 words
    ... . The Egyptians religion permeated their whole life - socially, politically, and economically (Casson 71). The Egyptian culture, way of life, and surroundings were ultimately responsible for inspiring the root and branches of myths and deities. According to the creation myth in the beginning there was a nothing called Ginnungagap. Then the fiery Muspell and the icy Niflheim came into being, and in between these two realms the cool air from Niflheim met the warm air from Muspell to thaw ice that began creating a sleeping giant named Ymir. As the giant slept he began to sweat, and from his sweat formed three frost giants. The melting ice then created Audhumla; a cow that fed Ymir with the ...
    Related: different aspects, norse mythology, egyptian culture, drowned, lakes
  • Crystal Heaven - 1,299 words
    Crystal Heaven Anthropology Research Paper 9 December 98 The Egyptian Hall at the Carnegie Museum is an excellent way to study ancient Egyptian culture. I was surprised to see all of the interesting facts I could gather about the culture I once knew very little about. The research project for my anthropology class taught me a lot about the history of Egypt, and now I know more about the culture than I ever thought I would. The first topic about Egypt we were to study was its geography. The Nile River is an important part in Egypts geography. The Nile is probably the most important resource the Egyptian people have. It provides water for many things: growing crops, fish and birds, and materia ...
    Related: crystal, ancient egypt, social class, egyptian culture, transportation
  • Egypt Religion - 830 words
    Egypt Religion To summarize the section on ancient Egypt, is to realize the extent of the faith all Egyptians held in religion and belief of their after life. Just looking at the great lengths the Egyptians went to in keeping the bodies safe for all eternity. From their burial sites and pyramids, to the 70 days it takes to prepare the body for proper burial. The Egyptians held so much sacred and believed so much in the ascension into afterlife, that to me it seemed that death was not to be feared by the Egyptians as long as their heart was pure. Although in the western world we probably think this is a bit extreme, but most people I think believe or want to believe in an afterlife, and, immo ...
    Related: ancient egypt, culture and religion, egypt, religion, western world
  • Egyptian Death Rituals - 1,024 words
    Egyptian Death Rituals The death of Pharaoh On a balmy November day in 1922 one of the greatest archeological finds ever would be made. It all started with the discovery of a single rough cut stone step, the first in a staircase that would lead to the most celebrated tomb of modern times. Howard Carter's discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamen would capture popular attention like no other discover before or after it. With each item brought from the tomb the public wanted to know more and more about the boy-king of Egypt. Probably the most intriguing and perplexing question surrounding the tomb is the mystery surrounding the death of the young Pharaoh. It has been over three thousand and three h ...
    Related: egyptian, egyptian culture, rituals, howard carter, modern times
  • Egyptian Religous Reforms - 1,306 words
    Egyptian Religous Reforms Early Egyptian Religious Beliefs and Akhenatens Reforms During the New Kingdom of Egypt (from 1552 through 1069 B.C.), there came a sweeping change in the religious structure of the ancient Egyptian civilization. The Hymn to the Aten was created by Amenhotep IV, who ruled from 1369 to 1353 B.C., and began a move toward a monotheist culture instead of the polytheist religion which Egypt had experienced for the many hundreds of years prior to the introduction of this new idea. There was much that was different from the old views in The Hymn to the Aten, and it offered a new outlook on the Egyptian ways of life by providing a complete break with the traditions which Eg ...
    Related: egyptian, egyptian art, egyptian civilization, egyptian culture, middle kingdom
  • Egyptian Religous Reforms - 1,377 words
    ... is name to, brought about many religious reforms. Amenhotep IV began a series of reforms to ensure the Pharaoh's status as a living god among the people, as opposed to a simple agent of the sun-god Amen-Re, as the priests of the royal court were beginning to assert a more powerful and independent role. Assisted by the royal family, Amenhotep IV commenced on a series of religious reforms, which would help him regain the power lost to the priests. He worshiped Aten, the radiant god of the sun disk. Why this particular god Aten was chosen may never be known, But Amenhotep IV apparently so inspired by his faith that he wrote The Hymn to the Aten in his praise. At first he tolerated worship o ...
    Related: egyptian, egyptian culture, moral philosophy, religion & politics, nile
  • Egyptmexican Pyramids - 1,108 words
    Egypt&Mexican Pyramids Mysteries of the Ancient World For many centuries people have been fascinated by ancient cultures and treasures. During the last two centuries the science of archeology and modern inventions allowed people to get inside of the Egyptian and Mayan pyramids and discover the treasures of Egyptian pharaohs and Mayan rulers. Most of what we know about Egypt we owe to the pyramids. Thanks to Egyptian belief in the afterlife we can now find out about the civilization that existed nearly five thousand years ago. Egyptian culture is not the only culture that left us its heritage in pyramids. In America we find pyramids build by civilizations of Olmec and Maya about 7th century C ...
    Related: egyptian pyramids, pyramids, west side, building blocks, chamber
  • Egyptmexican Pyramids - 1,097 words
    ... s three miles southwest of Cairo. The largest pyramid, 481 feet high and 786 feet along east side of base, was built for Khufu, who reigned between 2900 and 2877 B.C. The pyramid of Khafre, who reigned about 2859 B.C. is slightly smaller, but it is on a higher ground so that the apex is higher. The smallest pyramid (yet not small at all) was built by Menkure about 2800 B.C. (Casson 5). One of the most famous sites of Mayan culture is Tikal in Guatemala. Numerous buildings stayed almost intact at the Great Plaza: the Temple of the Giant Jaguar (700 A.D.), the Temple of the Masks (699 A.D), and the North Acropolis. At the heart of the Temple of the Giant jaguar is the tomb of high priest. ...
    Related: egyptian pyramids, pyramids, ancient maya, mayan culture, lenses
  • King Tutankhamun And His Treasures - 1,350 words
    King Tutankhamun And His Treasures King Tutankhamun and His Treasures The ancient Egyptians were noted for many things, one of which would have been their artwork. Egyptians used many medians in their artwork that enhanced the details and beauty of every piece of art. Their artwork is fascinating and mysterious, which pulls in the viewer into wanting to learn more. One of the most important and unique Egyptian artworks belongs to King Tutankhamun, a young pharaoh of Egypt. A brief history of the discovery of King Tut's tomb and the importance and beauty of certain pieces found in his tomb, will be discussed in this essay. King Tutankhamun's tomb was the prize that archaeologist Howard Carter ...
    Related: tutankhamun, egyptian art, brief history, ancient artifacts, flower
  • Roman Art Vs Greek Art - 1,178 words
    Roman Art Vs. Greek Art Paul Johnson Debbie Barret-Graves Western Civilization 10/29/00 Roman Art Vs. Greek Art Throughout history art has consistently reflected the cultural values and social structures of individual civilizations. Ancient art serves as a useful tool to help historians decipher some important aspects of ancient culture. From art we can determine the basic moral and philosophical beliefs of many ancient societies. The differences in arts purpose in Greece and Rome, for example, show us the fundamental differences in each cultures political and moral system. The primary objective of Greek art was to explore the order of nature and to convey philosophical thought, while Roman ...
    Related: greek, greek art, greek civilization, roman, roman art, roman republic
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