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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: american art

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  • Aaron Douglas - 1,128 words
    Aaron Douglas People may ask, what other than a tornado can come out of Kansas? Well, Aaron Douglas was born of May 26, 1899 in Topeka, Kansas. Aaron Douglas was a "Pioneering Africanist" artist who led the way in using African- oriented imagery in visual art during the Harlem Renaissance of 1919- 1929. His work has been credited as the catalyst for the genre incorporating themes in form and style that affirm the validity of the black consciousness and experience in America. His parents were Aaron and Elizabeth Douglas. In 1922, he graduated from the University of Nebraska School of Fine Arts in Lincoln. Who thought that this man would rise to meet W.E.B. Du Bois's 1921 challenge, calling fo ...
    Related: aaron, douglas, negro history, american experience, breath
  • Abstract Expressionism - 1,560 words
    Abstract Expressionism "What about the reality of the everyday world and the reality of painting? They are not the same realities. What is this creative thing that you have struggled to get and where did it come from? What reference or value does it have, outside of the painting itself?" Ad Reinhardt, in a group discussion at Studio 35, in 1950. My essay starts with the origin and the birth of this great expression in the twentieth century. This movement not only touched painting, it had an affect on various aspects of art- poetry, architecture, theater, film, photography. Vasily Kandinsky, Kazimir Malevich and Piet Mondrian are considered to be the pioneer artists to have achieved a truly a ...
    Related: abstract, abstract expressionism, expressionism, german expressionism, modern architecture
  • Afriancan Americans Role Of Television - 1,114 words
    Afriancan American's Role Of Television The roles African Americans play on television are not satisfactory. Though the roles have changed during the development of television, the current relationship is not representative of true African American people or their lifestyles. The question is how do the past roles African Americans play in television sitcoms compare to the current roles? How does this affect society's perception of the African American in American culture? Throughout the history of television the roles and the representation of African Americans has developed with the changing cultural conditions. However, the representation of African American's has not fully simulated into ...
    Related: african american, african american art, american art, american culture, american family, american people, famous african american
  • Allegory Of American Pie By Don Mclean - 1,202 words
    Allegory of American Pie by Don McLean A Piece of the "Pie" Ask anyone what was the defining moment in the rock history of the 1960s was and all you will get is a one word answer: Woodstock. The three day rock festival that defined an era was only one of many music festivals of the 60s. But Woodstock has come to symbolize, "an era of peaceful, free- loving, drug- taking hippie youth, carefree before harsher realities hit..." (Layman 40). The Woodstock festival ended a century filled with many metamorphoses of rocknroll, from the era of pop music to the rebirth of folk music to the invention of acid rock. But some cynics say that rocknroll died with the death of Buddy Holly before the 60s eve ...
    Related: allegory, american, american art, folk music, the courtroom
  • American Impressionism - 954 words
    American Impressionism In the years following the Civil War, American art underwent a fundamental shift. The traditional Romantic style of painting, which focused on portraying majestic scenes in stark, vivid lines and shapes, gave way to a new concern for light and atmosphere. It was the age of Impressionism. Impressionism was not indigenous to America. In fact, its origins lay in France, which had long been at the fore of artistic innovation. The French Impressionists threw off the shackles of traditional painting in favor of an airier, lighter style. The purpose of Impressionism was to convey the impression of an object by capturing the patterns of light and color on and surrounding it. T ...
    Related: american, american art, american artists, early american, great american, impressionism
  • Ernie Barnes: Research Of The Football Artist - 1,739 words
    Ernie Barnes: Research Of The Football Artist Ernie Barnes was and still is one of the most popular and well-respected black artists today. Born and raised in Durham, North Carolina, in 1938, during the time the south as segregated, Ernie Barnes was not expected to become a famous artist. However, as a young boy, Barnes would, "often [accompany] his mother to the home of the prominent attorney, Frank Fuller, Jr., where she worked as a [housekeeper]" (Artist Vitae, The Company of Art, 1999). Fuller was able to spark Barnes' interest in art when he was only seven years old. Fuller told him about the various schools of art, his favorite painters, and the museums he visited (Barnes, 1995, p. 7). ...
    Related: american football, artist, college football, ernie, famous artist, football, football league
  • Faith Ringolds Biography - 417 words
    Faith Ringold`S Biography FAITH RINGOLD`S BIOGRAPHY Who was Faith Ringold ? Born in New York , Faith Ringold was an African American artist who started school in 2nd grade . While she was at home , her mother taught her the basic skills . She knew how to read before she went to school . In her early childhood she use to be sick every so often , she could not attend school regularly ; however, her mother use to bring her drawing books and pencils . Therefore , she spent most of her time drawing . So, as she grew older and began to go to school , one day her teacher asked her to draw a mountain. Because she was born and raised in New York, she had never seen a mountain before; therefore, she c ...
    Related: biography, african american, harriet tubman, american art, tubman
  • Georgia Okeefe - 1,140 words
    Georgia O'keefe * Georgia O'Keeffe is one of the most influential artists there is today. Her works are valued highly and are quite beautiful and unique. As a prominent American artist, Georgia O'Keeffe is famous for her images of gigantic flowers, city-scapes and distinctive desert scenes. All of these different phases represent times in her life. Throughout the seventy years of her creative career, Georgia O'Keeffe continually made some of the most original contributions to the art of our time. As Georgia O'Keeffe's awareness of her sexuality heightened, she started to paint marvelous original abstractions in exuberant rainbows or colors. These colors seemed to celebrate her happiness. One ...
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  • Jacob Lawrence - 393 words
    Jacob Lawrence Jacob Lawrence is among the most distinguished and accomplished artists of the twentieth-century. His artwork is in every major public collection of twentieth century American art and has been the subject of three nationally touring retrospectives, organized by the American Federation of Arts (1960), Whitney Museum of American Art (1974), and Seattle Art Museum (1986). During his sixty-five year career, he received numerous awards and honors including the National Medal of Arts from President George Bush, the NAACP's prestigious Spingarn Medal, three Julius Rosenwald Fund Fellowships, and more than two dozen honorary degrees. He was also a member of the American Academy of Art ...
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  • John Coltrane - 1,034 words
    John Coltrane Jazz, taking its roots in African American folk music, has evolved, metamorphosed, and transposed itself over the last century to become a truly American art form. More than any other type of music, it places special emphasis on innovative individual interpretation. Instead of relying on a written score, the musician improvises. For each specific period or style through which jazz has gone through over the past seventy years, there is almost always a single person who can be credited with the evolution of that sound. From Thelonius Monk, and his bebop, to Miles Davis cool jazz, from Dizzy Gillespies big band to John Coltranes free jazz; Americas music has been developed, and re ...
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  • Marcel Duchamp - 1,641 words
    ... nt wheel from a bicycle in a type of sculpture. He mounted the wheel to a kitchen stool in effect making the first mobile sculpture. Duchamp would later name the kinetic sculptures of Alexander Calder simply as mobiles. These simple sculptures named mobiles and ready-mades were designed to make people think, to use their mind to understand art instead of only using their eyes. In early 1916 the Dada movement was born in a direct result of World War I. This was not really even an artistic movement. To be more accurate the Dada art was more a frame of mind. This frame of mind was anti-art and, as time progressed, anti-everything else. The Dada movement was seen by conservatives as dangerou ...
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  • New York And Chicago During The 1920s - 1,260 words
    New York and Chicago During the 1920's The 1920's was a huge decade for the phenomena known as Jazz. Due to the closing of the seaport in New Orleans, musicians were forced to travel up the Mississippi to find work. Two of the cities most affected by this move were Chicago and New York. Chicago was home primarily for New Orleans traditional music during the 1920's. From this New Orleans style came four major types of jazz: Boogie-Woogie, Chicago Jazz, Urban Blues, and Society Dance Bands. Because of the ever-growing popularity of nightclubs during Prohibition, these styles of jazz thrived so musicians were guaranteed jobs. The popularity of the phonograph also provided a huge boost to the mu ...
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  • Norman Rockwell - 1,060 words
    Norman Rockwell Norman Percevel Rockwell was born on Feb. 3, 1894 in New York, New York. As a boy he grew fond of the country, where he moved to a few years after he was born, and stayed away from the city as much as he could, which would later be shown in his works (Buechner, Retrospective, 24). When he was 14, he had to commute to New York City twice a week to attend the Chase School of Fine and Applied Art. After awhile he dropped out of his sophomore year of high school, and became a full time student at The National Academy School (Buechner, Artist, 38). He illustrated his first Saturday Evening Post cover on May 20, 1916, which was his first big break. Norman Rockwell says, "If one wan ...
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  • Pop Art - 446 words
    Pop Art "Pop art" is a term used to describe popular art, the word popular meaning everyday life. Pop art also varied greatly, from soup cans to comic book art to abstract art. Pop artistis often have "satirical or playful intents." This would mean that a pop artist tries to express himself through humorous art. An early pop artist was Andy Warhol, who is known for his drawing of a can of soup.He was American and was born in 1928. He died in 1987. His works can be found at the Whitney museum of American Art and at the Museum of Modern Art. Another American pop artist was Roy Lichenstein. He was born in 1923 and is still living. His work can also be found at the Whitney Museum of modern art a ...
    Related: popular art, comic book, american art, magna
  • The Austin Museum Of Art - 738 words
    The Austin Museum of Art The Austin Museum of Art The Austin Museum of Art was the first of the three galleries attended. At the time, the museum had a touring "Rock and Roll" exhibit, which had its focus on the influence of the Rock and-Roll culture on art. The pieces were arranged in a chronological order and started with the Pop Art of the early 1960s. Located in the section were two silk screens, one of Mick Jaggard and the other of Prince, done by Andy Warhol. There were a few other pieces in this time period that helped to point out a major turning point in both art and photography. It was now okay to use other peoples photographs in an art piece. Also, it symbolized a beginning of the ...
    Related: austin, museum, make money, andy warhol, visible
  • The History Of The Smithsonian Institution And Its Founder, Has Truly Had An Impact On What The Elaborate, Extensive, And Com - 1,465 words
    ... reality. Ripley envisioned the Smithsonian as a 'society of scholars,' a 'university without classes.' In other words, he wanted to have vast buildings enclosed with shops, restaurants, and rest areas. He wanted events to entertain and educate the public. To reach these goals, he got another 50 scientists, developed an Office of Education and Training to make programs for students and young professionals. Ripley also extended the evening hours in the galleries and the museums. Luckily, Ripley's plans coincided with those of President Lyndon B. Johnson's plans of "Great Society" programs of the late 1960's. Johnson sought to improve the lives' of all Americans. So, on Ripley's first missi ...
    Related: african american history, american history, history, institution, natural history, smithsonian, smithsonian institution
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