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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: edinburgh

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  • 100 Years Of History - 1,762 words
    100 Years of History CURRENT EVENTS: 1945-1996 1945 On April 12 Harry S. Truman became President of the United States of America., In Washington, D.C. On August 6 at 9:15 a.m. US fighter planes dropped an Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima Japan. In Berlin, Germany on April 30, Adolf Hitler was found dead, Hitler committed suicide. 1946 On October 16 in Nurenburg, 9 Nazi war criminals were hanged for the crimes during WW II. On April 25 Big Four Ministers met in Paris to finalize a treaty with Germany, to end WWII. In Austria Queens New York, on October 22, Chester Carlos tried his experiment that is commonly known as the Xerox machine. 1947 On November 20, in England, Queen Elizabeth gets married to ...
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  • Adam Smith - 803 words
    Adam Smith Adam Smith was born in Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland. His exact date of his birth is unknown but he was baptized on June 5, 1723. At the age of fifteen, Smith began attending Glasgow University where he studied moral philosophy. In 1748 he began giving lectures in Edinburgh where he discussed rhetoric and later he began to discuss the economic philosophy of the "simple system of natural liberty" which he later proclaimed in his Inquiry into Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. In 1751, Smith was appointed professor of logic at Glasgow university, transferring in 1752 to the chair of moral philosophy. His lectures covered the field of ethics, rhetoric, jurisprudence and politica ...
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  • Aids Whats New Is The Message Getting Through We Already Know Enough About Aids To Prevent Its Spread, But Ignorance, Complac - 1,708 words
    AIDS - What's new ? ------------------- Is the message getting through? We already know enough about AIDS to prevent its spread, but ignorance, complacency, fear and bigotry continue to stop many from taking adequate precautions. We know enough about how the infection is transmitted to protect ourselves from it without resorting to such extremes as mandatory testing, enforced quarantine or total celibacy. But too few people are heeding the AIDS message. Perhaps many simply don't like or want to believe what they hear, preferring to think that AIDS "can't happen to them." Experts repeatedly remind us that infective agents do not discriminate, but can infect any and everyone. Like other commun ...
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  • Charles Darwin - 1,851 words
    Charles Darwin Charles Robert Darwin was a man of many hats. He was a friend, colleague, son, father, husband; but above all, he was a naturalist. Through his dedication and perseverance did he manage to, in less than a generation, establish the theory of evolution as a fact in peoples' minds. In fact, [t]oday it is almost impossible for us to return, even momentarily, to the pre-Darwinian atmosphere and attitude (West 323). Darwin formed the basis of his theory during the voyage of the H.M.S. Beagle, on which vessel he was posted as it travelled around the globe. During that five-year span, this young man saw foliage, creatures, cultures that he had never known first-hand before. He was exp ...
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  • Charles Darwin - 969 words
    Charles Darwin Charles Darwin Charles Robert Darwin, as he was known in full, brought many interesting ideas to the world of science. He was credited for developing the evolutionary theory by natural selection and also for discovering a species of frog while in South America. Darwin has many followers of his theory of evolution but there are many people who are trying to disprove his theory. These people have showed that their different theories prove Darwin could not have been correct in every aspect of his theory, but there is no absolute right or wrong to the theory of evolution. The world will continue to be divided on the subject of evolution. Charles Darwin was born on February 18, 180 ...
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  • Charles Darwin - 372 words
    Charles Darwin Darwin was born in Shrewsbury, Shropshire. He was the son of Robert Waring Darwin and his wife Susannah; and the grandson of the scientist Erasmus Darwin, and of the potter Josiah Wedgwood. His mother died when he was eight years old, and he was brought up by his sister. He was taught classics at Shrewsbury, then sent to Edinburgh to study medicine, which he hated, and a final attempt at educating him was made by sending him to Christ's College, Cambridge, to study theology (1827). During that period he loved to collect plants, insects, and geological specimens, guided by his cousin William Darwin Fox, an entomologist. His scientific inclinations were encouraged by his botany ...
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  • Charles Darwin - 647 words
    Charles Darwin In 1859 when Charles Darwin published his book "The Origin of Species", it caused much controversy between the scientific and religious worlds. It caused many people to question their belief in the teaching of the Bible. The strongly held belief that the Bible was the literal truth clashed with the Darwin theory. Some people rejected and scorned Darwin while others tried to reevaluate their beliefs. Darwin theorized that species evolved from other species. The belief that God directly created man seemed unlikely to mix with Darwin's theory. Charles Darwin was born in Shrewsbury, England February 12, 1809. He had his preliminary schooling at Shrewsbury. He was then sent in 1825 ...
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  • Charles Darwin - 377 words
    Charles Darwin science Charles Darwin Darwin was born in February, 1809. He left the school at Shrewsbury to the University of Edinburgh to study medicine. In 1827 he dropped out of medical school and entered the University of Cambridge, intending to become a clergyman. There he met Adam Sedgwick, a geologist and John Stevens Henslow, a naturalist. Henslow not only helped build Darwin's self-confidence but also taught his student to be an observer of natural phenomena and collector of specimens. After graduating from Cambridge in 1831, the 22-year-old Darwin was taken aboard the English survey ship HMS Beagle, largely on Henslow's recommendation, as an unpaid naturalist on a scientific exped ...
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  • Charles Darwin And The Development And Impact Of The Theory Of Evolution By Natural And Sexual Selection - 1,768 words
    ... tion of new species. By this chance encounter than, Darwins theory was provided with a rationale, and the how of evolution came to supplement the why. It is important to note, that even though the crux of Darwins theory was inspired by Malthus, Darwin diverged from Malthus in a critical way. Darwins debt to Malthus lies in the borrowing of the concept of the struggle for existence. However, in general, what Malthus was concerned about was not how the struggle for existence affected the quality of the population (i.e., he did not suggest that in the struggle for existence the strong survive and the weak perish) but simply how it limited its numbers. Indeed, Malthus essay was written as a ...
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  • Clause And Effect: Antihomosexual Laws - 952 words
    Clause and Effect: Anti-Homosexual Laws $115 Designer Cosmetic Collection From Cosmetique -- Only $1! Clause and Effect: Anti-Homosexual Laws "In Edinburgh, a homosexual man is four times more likely to be attacked than a heterosexual man." This fact has been iterated so much by the media over the past few weeks that it would be a challenge to find one Scot who could not quote it accurately. One would think that this alarming statistic could be greatly improved if people were educated from an early age in the aspects of homosexuality, and taught, even if not to agree with it, at least to be tolerating towards it. Why, then, is there such an opposition to the repealing of Section 28 of the Lo ...
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  • Cloning Sheeps - 541 words
    Cloning Sheeps Three years ago a sheep named Dolly became the biggest news since the first successful open-heart surgery. Dolly, unlike every other mammal on earth is an identical copy of its mother. Dolly has no father. The "miracle" of cloning was preformed by Dr. Ian Willmut and his team at Roslin Institute in Edinburgh, Scotland. The new research has opened a large amount of possibilities for the future use of the technique as well as many ethical issues regarding human cloning. The Roslin Institute team created Dolly by transferring the nuclei of adult sheep cells in to the egg of another female sheep. The egg had its natural nucleus removed by microsurgery. Ones the new nucleus was imp ...
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  • Cystic Fibrosis - 1,101 words
    ... o a human. These were milestones in finding a cure or a preventive treatment. They were huge steps because it marked the first time that scientists were able to test new technology in people with the disease. Also in October of 93'12 scientists at the University of Iowa made another big step, they determined that the CF gene treatment worked! It had repaired the defective CF cells. This too was the first time that the basic defect was corrected in people with the disease. Doctors and scientists know that the gene number 7 is the gene that CF is found upon. They also know that gene's protein product most likely induces the movement of chloride directly or indirectly. They named the protei ...
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  • Daniel Defoe - 1,033 words
    Daniel Defoe Daniel Defoe's acclaimed novel, Robinson Crusoe, is not only a great adventurous novel, but an amazing reflection of Defoe's moral beliefs, personal experiences, and political battles with the English monarchy. Throughout the course of this novel, references to defoe's own experiences come up again and again. In addition to these numerous references, the general story line of Robinson Crusoe tells a similar story to that of Defoe's actual life; slightly reminiscent of the prodigal son theme. Daniel Defoe used realism to enhance his novel. While many critics agree with this statement, some think that he should have been more accurate with his realism. Critics also found the book ...
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  • Darwinism - 1,101 words
    Darwinism Throughout time, great minds have produced ideas that have changed the world we live in. Similarly, in the Victorian times, Charles Darwin fathomed ideas that altered the way we look at ourselves and fellow creatures. By chance, Darwin met and learned of certain individuals who opened doors that laid the foundation for his theories which shook the world. Darwin's initial direction in life was not the same as his final. He grew up in a wealthy sophisticated English family and at the age of sixteen, Darwin went to the University of Edinburgh to study medicine.(Darwin) Two years later, he decided to leave medical school and attended the University of Cambridge to become a clergyman of ...
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  • Day - 1,483 words
    ... t of the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh, Scotland, plans to embark on a human-embryo-cloning project aimed at developing therapies for treating conditions such as diabetes and Parkinson's disease. . Cloning, once the most controversial issue in the world, was going to bring out the argument again. People get really confused in which side they would take. Me too. In the very beginning, I felt horrible even though I just thought about cloning human. Its totally disrespect to Mother Nature and the God. Nature would surely punish those tried to change the nature should be. Later, when some scientist stand up for cloning technique, I began to waver. They said that the purpose of cloning tech i ...
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  • Demorgan - 684 words
    Demorgan Augustus ?The Logical One? De Morgan Augustus De Morgan was born in Mandura, India, on June 27, 1806. His father John was a colonel in the Indian Army. At birth Augustus lost sight in his right eye. After seven months he moved to England with his family. Augustus attended private education where he learned Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and mathematics. He did not excel at school and was made the blunt of all the jokes from his schoolmates. In 1923, at the age of sixteen, he entered Trinity College in Cambridge. He received his bachelor?s degree at Trinity, but was not eligible for the master?s degree because he refused to take the theological exam. He graduated from Trinity College in 1927. ...
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  • Dylan Thomas - 1,489 words
    Dylan Thomas Dylan Thomas' Final Trip to America Dylan Marlais Thomas was born in Swansea, Wales on October 27, 1914. He died November 9th, 1953 in New York City. In only 39 years, Dylan Thomas left an indelible mark on history. Thomas published numerous books of his poetry, plays, short stories, and various other works. He first toured America in early 1950, reading at a variety of public forums. This tour was very successful and Thomas fell in love with America, a romance that would bring his end just more than three years later. "This first lecture tour of three months was a roaring success, or roaring and a success" (Sinclair, 166). Thomas gave great lectures on this tour, but more impor ...
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  • File Sharing Systems - 4,172 words
    ... ie Zahl der User, die nur Dateien downloaden ohne selbst welche anzubieten, explosiv ansteigt und somit die Napster Groupnets zu eigentlichen Musikbibliotheken degradiert werden. 2.2.2. Technische Aspekte Benutzung Im Gegensatz zu seinen weiterentwickelten Klonen verfgt Napster ber einen zentralen Server (www.napster.com), auf dem die Napster Software auf den eigenen PC zur Installation heruntergeladen werden kann. Nach erfolgter Installation wird der Windows Desktop um ein entsprechendes Icon ergnzt, welches bei Online Verbindung aktiviert werden kann. Das folgend erscheinende Benutzerinterface ermglicht die nach verschiedenen Begriffen geordnete Suche nach dem gewnschten Musikstck. G ...
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  • Genetics - 2,024 words
    ... gument in the Western societies is that parents who have large families want a mixture of sons and daughters, and most patients attending sex/gender selection clinics already have children of the same sex/gender and seek another of the opposite. Once a male child has been born, parents are less concerned about the sex/gender of any later siblings. Statham et al (1993) conducted a survey of British women and was asked in the early stages of pregnancy if they minded what the sex/gender of their baby would be. Fifty eight percent said no and among those who expressed a strong preference six percent wanted a boy and an equal percentage wanted a girl. There was also only a hint of male bias i ...
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  • Gnostic Jesus - 1,489 words
    ... ness of the world's sins (Groothuis). Pagels says that rather than viewing Christ's death as a sacrificial offering to atone for guilt and sin, the Gospel of Truth sees the crucifixion as the occasion for discovering the divine self within (Pagels, 95). In the Gospel of Mary, physical suffering has no reality because physicality has no reality (G. of Mary). Christ's crucifixion has a different meaning when he is not suffering on the cross for our sins. This is because in Gnosticism a person's pure soul was made good and the earth and matter were corrupted, so there is no need for forgiveness. In canonical stories, a perfect God made the earth and the people corrupted it with sin, so Chri ...
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