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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: ecosystems

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  • Effects Of Acid Rain On North Americas Aquatic Ecosystems - 1,898 words
    Effects Of Acid Rain On North America's Aquatic Ecosystems In the past century, one of the greatest threats to North America's aquatic ecosystem has been the widespread acidification of hundreds of thousands of waterways. Acid rain has effected plant and animal life within aquatic ecosystems, as well as microbiologic activity by affecting the rates of decomposition and the accumulation of organic matter. What causes this poisonous rain, and what can be done to improve North America's water quality and prevent future catastrophes? To answer these questions, we must first examine the cause and formation of acid rain, as well as understand ways to decrease or prevent its formation. Formation of ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, americas, aquatic, aquatic ecosystems, ecosystems, north america
  • Acid Rain - 1,013 words
    Acid Rain Acid Rain (The Environmental Effects) My first question is , What is Acid Rain? You hear about it all the time in the news and it is very important to the earths ecosystem. In simple terms, acid rain is rain that is more acidic than normal. All objects in nature have a certain level of acicicity but acid rain has too much acid in it. Acid rain is a complicated problem, caused by air pollution. Acid rain's spread and damage involves weather, chemistry, soil, and the life cycles of plants and animals on the land and from acid rain in the water. Acidity is measured using a pH scale, with the number 7 being neutral. Therefore, a body with a pH value of less than 7 is acidic. On the oth ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, air pollution, new england
  • Acid Rain - 820 words
    Acid Rain For years ever since most of the world has been industrialized, the effects of pollution have plagued nations alike. Acid rain is one of the largest contributors to this industrialized form of pollution. Throughout this report an explanation of the devastating effects to the environment caused by acid rain will be given along with what is being done to stop it. Acid rain is made when pollutants arise from the use of coal in the production of electricity, from base- metal smelting and from fuel combustion in vehicles. Once the sulfur and nitrogen oxides from these man made causes are released into the air they are caught by wind currents and are blown hundreds of miles away. The gas ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, northern europe, air pollution
  • Acid Rain - 1,774 words
    Acid Rain What is acid rain? Acid rain is the term for pollution caused when sulfur and nitrogen dioxides combine with atmospheric moisture. The term 'acid rain' is slightly misleading, and would be more accurate if deemed 'enhanced acid rain', as rain occurs acidic naturally. Acidity is measured on what is know as the pH scale. Fourteen is the most basic, seven is the most neutral, and zero is the most acidic. Pure rain has a pH level of 7, which is exactly neutral. The acidity of rain is determined by the pH of pure water in reaction with atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, resulting in carbonic acid. These particles partly dissociate to produce hydrogen ions and bicarbonate ions ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, electric utilities, major change
  • Acid Rain - 1,829 words
    ... . These particles collect on the leaves of the tree, and studies have shown that when these particles contain acid they can cause damage to the leaves. The leaves are the part of the tree that help make food, hence any damage to the leaves will result in harm to the health of the entire tree. Coniferous trees are vulnerable to the harmful effects of acid rain as well. The tree's needles are designed to nourish the tree after they fall to the ground. Each needle houses whole colonies of microscopic bacteria and algae that help the tree change nitrogen into food at the roots. Acid rain will often burn away this material, thereby reducing adequate food supply, and weakening the tree's healt ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, eastern canada, human health
  • Acid Rain - 1,731 words
    Acid Rain Introduction: What Causes Acid Rain? One of the main causes of acid rain is sulfur dioxide. Natural sources, which emit this gas, are Volcanoes, sea spray, rotting vegetation and plankton. However, the burning of fossil fuels, such as Coal and oil, are largely to be blamed for approximately half of the emissions of this gas in the world. When sulfur dioxide reaches the atmosphere, it oxidizes to first form a sulfate ion. It then Becomes sulfuric acid as it joins with hydrogen atoms in the air and falls back down to earth. Oxidation occurs the most in clouds and especially in heavily polluted air where other compounds such as ammonia and ozone help to catalyze the reaction, changing ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, case study, ohio river
  • Acid Rain And North America - 1,891 words
    Acid Rain And North America In the past century, one of the greatest threats to North America's aquatic ecosystem has been the widespread acidification of hundreds of thousands of waterways. Acid rain has effected plant and animal life within aquatic ecosystems, as well as microbiologic activity by affecting the rates of decomposition and the accumulation of organic matter. What causes this poisonous rain, and what can be done to improve North America's water quality and prevent future catastrophes? To answer these questions, we must first examine the cause and formation of acid rain, as well as understand ways to decrease or prevent its formation. Formation of acid rain. Acid deposition, mo ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, america, north america, rain
  • Acid Rain Legislation - 824 words
    Acid Rain Legislation Acid Rain Legislation Acid rain is a destructive force as a result of nature and man colliding. It is formed through harmful industrial emissions combining with contents of the earth's atmosphere; a dangerous combination. This prompted governments throughout North America to take action. Many laws and regulations have been implemented, yet the question still remains, Should tougher legislation be implemented to force industries to reduce acid rain emissions? To decide whether tougher legislation should be implemented, one must first understand the details of what exactly acid rain is. Acid rain is a result of mankind's carelessness. It travels a long one of the most eff ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, legislation, rain, power plants
  • Air Pollutin In Bratislava - 1,084 words
    Air Pollutin In Bratislava SLOVAKIA Name of Ministry/Office: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Slovak Republic, Department of International Economic Cooperation Date: 7 January, 1997 Economic Cooperation Dr. Jan Varso, Charg d' Affaires Mailing address: Stromov 1, 833, 36 Bratislava, Slovakia Telephone: 42-7-3704 214 Telefax: 42-7-372 326 Note from the Secretariat: An effort has been made to present all country profiles within a common format, with an equal number of pages. However, where Governments have not provided information for the tables appended to Chapters 4 and 17, those tables have been omitted entirely in order to reduce the overall length of the profile and save paper. Conseque ...
    Related: pest management, international council, monetary fund, transfer, drought
  • Air Pollution - 1,546 words
    Air Pollution Air Pollution is addition of harmful substances to the atmosphere resulting in damage to the environment, human health, and quality of life. One of many forms of pollution, air pollution occurs inside homes, schools, and offices; in cities; across continents; and even globally. Air pollution makes people sick, it causes breathing problems and promotes cancer, and it harms plants, animals, and the ecosystems in which they live. Some air pollutants return to earth in the form of acid rain and snow, which corrode statues and buildings, damage crops and forests, and make lakes and streams unsuitable for fish and other plant and animal life. Pollution is changing the earth's atmosph ...
    Related: air pollution, pollution, greenhouse gases, global scale, burn
  • Air Quality - 1,726 words
    Air Quality Air Quality & Dispersion Today, the air quality aspect of ARL research is by far the dominant theme, but distinctions among the themes remain somewhat vague. For example, the models developed for emergency response purposes are among those used for air quality prediction. The Air Quality and Dispersion theme is one of the strongest ties that binds ARL's components together. ARL is not heavily involved in the pure science of the business. Instead, ARL focusses on the need to assemble integrated understanding and models from all available sources, to develop the capability to predict changes in air quality that will follow changes in emissions, or that will occur as a result of met ...
    Related: quality assurance, scientific research, global positioning system, silver spring, zone
  • Aquaculture - 1,393 words
    Aquaculture Aquaculture is the farming of aquatic organisms in fresh, or salt water. A wide variety of aquatic organisms are produced through aquaculture, including fish, crustaceans, mollusks, algae, and aquatic plants. Unlike capture fisheries, aquaculture requires deliberate human intervention in the organisms' productivity and results in yields that exceed those from the natural environment alone. Stocking water with (juvenile organisms), fertilizing the water, feeding the organisms, and maintaining water quality are common examples of such intervention. Most aquacultural crops are destined for human consumption. However, aquaculture also produces bait fishes, ornamental or aquarium fish ...
    Related: aquaculture, thermal energy, natural environment, atlantic coast, concrete
  • Bears Beware - 892 words
    Bears Beware subject = Environmental Issues title = Bears Beware In our world today many animals and plants are loosing their fight against human intervention in their once well-balanced ecosystem. We are all aware of the extinction of the dinosaurs and the dodo birds, however most people do not realize that annually thousands of species of our flora and fauna are now becoming extinct. This on going trend is increasingly threatening our bio diversity and global ecology. To give a specific example of animal depletion I will focus on Canadian bears. The following factors are responsible for their decline. Hunting, loss of habitat, and just plain apathy on part of the public to preserve the bio ...
    Related: bears, environmental issues, acid rain, first nations people, personally
  • Big Oil And Bus Ethics - 1,640 words
    ... al erosion, and if they blame oil companies then they don't show it. Regardless of the Natives' opinions, their rights are still being violated. The workers at the Alang ship-wrecking yards were happy for the work they had and the meager wages they were being paid, but a slew of their rights were being violated. A group of people, such as the Arctic slope natives can be in favor of activities and still have their rights (unspoiled environment) violated. Wildlife The right of habitat for the wildlife in the Arctic has been infringed upon to a degree by the oil companies. The problem with this argument is that the oil companies can offer proof that the wildlife in the area hasn't really su ...
    Related: ethics, ethical business, california press, economic development, alaska
  • Biomass - 1,670 words
    Biomass Many factors contribute to the diversity of life in an environment. The availability of nutrients and sunlight, along with other factors that play a pivotal role in determining what and how much life an area can sustain. While studying the Second Law of Thermodynamics, it came to my attention that the classical pyramid shape of the producer, C1, C2, C3, biomass pyramid did little to take into account the amount of detrital input. I hypothesized that the amount detrital input greatly effected the number of C1, C2, and C3 consumers and thus the overall biodiversity of an ecosystem. Further, if you could find a test-bed where detrital input was the only real difference between two simil ...
    Related: biomass, oxygen content, null hypothesis, surrounding area, comparison
  • Biomes Of The World - 1,106 words
    Biomes Of The World A biome, also known as life zones, consists of all plants, animals, and other organisms, as well the physical environment in a particular area. A biome is characterized by its' plant life, climate, and location. The climate and physical features determine the boundaries of a biome. A biome is made up of many different ecosystems. The ecosystems tend to have the same pants and animals as neighboring biomes around the boundaries. The major biomes are the tundra, taiga, tropical rain forest, temperate forests, desert, grassland, savanna, chaparral, and marine. Each biome has it's own characteristics such as the tundra. The tundra is a biome that is located in the Northern He ...
    Related: south africa, polar bear, flowering plants, alaska, trout
  • Business Ethics - 1,474 words
    Business Ethics As a corporate manager of a publicly held company, one is responsible for the interests of many different stakeholders. In the past, it has been a very common assumption and practice that corporate managers of a company should strive to act solely for the benefit of shareholders, or owners of the company. Corporate managers were trained to take any actions necessary or use any means possible to improve the bottom line; or profits, without regard to other stakeholders. As a business student at San Diego State, I had adopted this same bottom line philosophy that had been preached to me since the day of my first business class. I had bought into these teachings so wholeheartedly ...
    Related: business ethics, doing business, ethics, acid rain, utilitarian perspective
  • Corals And Adaptations - 680 words
    Corals and Adaptations Coral reefs are among the most diverse and productive communities on Earth. They are found in the warm, clear, shallow waters of tropical oceans worldwide. Reefs have functions ranging from providing food and shelter to fish and invertebrates, to protecting the shore from erosion. Although many corals resemble plants, they are actually members of the animal phylum Cnidaria. Most corals are colonial, which means that each coral is made up of many individual polyps connected by living tissue (the coenosarc). Each polyp has a cup-like shape with a ring of tentacles around a central opening (pharynx) that functions as both mouth and anus. The tentacles are tipped with stin ...
    Related: coral reefs, symbiotic relationship, different types, important role, shallow
  • Deep Ecololgy - 1,844 words
    Deep Ecololgy Deep Ecology/Ecosophy The ideas behind deep ecology have major implications today. They allow people to think more profoundly about the environment and possibly come to a better understanding of their own meaning. People are intensely concerned about the worlds technological adolescence, massive consumerism, and overpopulation. A man named Arne Naess, former head of the philosophy department at the University of Oslo founded an idea that can direct peoples anxiety away from their shallow notion of the problem to one that is much deeper. Deep ecology goes beyond the limited piecemeal shallow approach to environmental problems and attempts to articulate a comprehensive religious ...
    Related: human life, wilderness areas, face value, outline, dependency
  • Deforestations Impact - 1,329 words
    Deforestations Impact PSC 391 May 1, 2000 Deforestation is the permanent destruction of indigenous forests and woodlands.(WWF) Currently, forests cover approximately one fifth of the worlds land. Forests provide us with many products we use in our everyday lives. They also provide for us in other ways such from helping stop soil erosion to providing us with medical drugs, dyes and fabrics.. Humanity depends on the survival of a healthy ecosystem and deforestation is causing many social, economic and ecological problems. Approximately 12 million hectares of forests are depleted each year. Ninety percent of the clearing occurs in the tropical rainforests. At the current rate of clearing, all t ...
    Related: westview press, population explosion, carbon dioxide, canadian, comparing
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