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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: economic crisis

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  • Adolf Hitler - 1,998 words
    Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler did not live a very long life, but during his time he caused such a great deal of death and destruction that his actions still have an effect on the world nearly 50 years later. People ask what could've happen to this small sickly boy during his childhood that would've led him do such horrible things? For Adolf it might have been society, rejection from his father, failure as an artist or was he born to hate? Adolf was born in Braunau, Austria in 1889. His father, Alois was a minor customs official, and his mother was a peasant girl. Adolf attended elementary school for four years and entered secondary school at the age of eleven. Adolf's dreams of beco ...
    Related: adolf, adolf hitler, hitler, vienna hitler, mein kampf
  • American Women During Wwii - 1,832 words
    American Women During Wwii American Women During World War II. America's entry into World War II posed opportunities for American women domestically, yet paradoxically heightened fears in the polity about the exact role that women should adopt during wartime. A central issue that dominated women's lives during this period was how to combine the private sphere of the home, with the new demands of the war economy in the public sphere. Women made significant gains in the military, the war economy and in some cases, in terms of political influence. Yet these gains were misleading for policy makers utilised the female workforce for short-term gains during war, with a long-term goal of seeing wome ...
    Related: american, american society, american women, black women, employed women, married women, men and women
  • Asian Crisis - 1,925 words
    Asian Crisis Introduction A financial crisis swept like a bush fire through the tiger economies of South East Asia between June 1997 and January 1998. One country after another, local stocks markets and currency imploded. When the dust started to settle, the stock markets in many of these countries had lost over 70% of their value. Leaders of some these nations had to approach the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to beg for massive financial assistance. The crisis in Asia has occurred after several decades of outstanding economic performance and growth. Annual Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth in the ASEAN- 5 (Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia and Philippines) averaged closed to 8% ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian crisis, crisis, east asian, economic crisis, financial crisis
  • Asian Crisis - 291 words
    Asian Crisis The continuing Asian economic crisis that began in mid-1997 ranks as Asia's second biggest event since World War II. The crisis suddenly halted the region's unprecedented three decades of rapid economic growth. Within Asia itself, the crisis has had not only serious domestic social, political, and economic impact, it has affected intra- and extraregional international relations, as well as intellectual and policy discourse. At the same time, the crisis has almost incompatibly, spawned the deepest uncertainty yet among Asian government and business leaders and the public at large about the wisdom of following the universalistic (but really Western, especially American-propagated) ...
    Related: asian, asian crisis, crisis, economic crisis, hong kong
  • Asian Crisis - 998 words
    ... dollar attractive they would have to keep the interest rate therefor business would slump. (see why did it happen?) Another article; Four myths of the Asian economic crisis. 12-18 January 1998. Web site www.newaus.com, disagrees with the view that pegged currencies is one of the problems. The article states that pegging currencies cannot be damaging as long as they are pegged at their market rates. It says that the only way a problem could arise is if the currency of an economy begins to inflate against the currency to which it is pegged. The countries will then begin to experience the crisis. "They find their currencies become overvalued, current account problems begin to emerge and spe ...
    Related: asian, asian crisis, asian financial, asian financial crisis, asian market, crisis, economic crisis
  • Asian Crisis - 1,338 words
    Asian Crisis A large economic downturn in East Asia threatens to end its nearly 30 year run of high growth rates. It is hard to understand what these declines will actualy do to the world market. The crisis has caused Asian currencies to fall 50-60%, stock markets to decline 40%, banks to close, and property values to drop. The crisis was brought on by currency devaluations, bad banking practices, high foreign debt, loose government regulation, and corruption. Due to East Asia's large impact on the world economy, the panic in Thailand, Indonesia, Korea, and other Asian countries has prompted other countries to worry about the affect on their own economies and offer aid to the financially tro ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian crisis, asian nations, crisis, east asian, economic crisis
  • Asian Financial Crisis - 1,304 words
    Asian Financial Crisis Introduction Many economists have said that the growth experienced by Southeastern Asian countries during the 1980s and early 1990s was a miracle. Japan, Malaysia, South Korea, Indonesia and other countries in the region experienced annual growth rates of over 7 percent. Along with this rapid growth, these countries also saw very little unemployment and an almost invisible wealth gap between the different social and economic classes of citizens. Circumstances have dramatically changed, however. In the summer of 1997, Southeast Asia experienced a time of great financial and economic turmoil. At first, the economic crisis was isolated in Thailand's financial sector, but ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian financial, asian financial crisis, crisis, economic crisis, financial crisis
  • Budgetary Proccess - 457 words
    Budgetary Proccess Budgetary Process The federal budget runs in a fiscal year, which last from October 1 to September 30. The Office of Management and Budget first helps to create the federal budget. It is then sent to the president, the central part of the budgetary system, and he must check it, and afterwards it is sent to Congress. Another governmental structure involved in the budgetary system is the General accounting office. The GAO is responsible in making sure that the government spends its money on what is has budgeted for. A continual aspect of the budget, is the deficit. Franklin Roosevelt believed that the government should spend more than it took in, in order to get the economy ...
    Related: budgetary, economic behavior, balanced budget, different types, adjustment
  • Canadian National Unity - 1,822 words
    Canadian National Unity Canadian National Unity has been a serious debate to all Canadians for close to three decades now. Starting with French President Charles DeGaulle, who in visiting Quebec told a large crowd in Motreal, Vivre le Quebec libre! or, Live in a free Quebec. This one event started the whole modern separtist movement in Canada, and brought us to where we are now. They went from one person with an idea then, to 2 provincial parties, and a federal one as well, now. This is a very serious issue, that could end up in the destuction of an amazing country. Its not like theyre bluffing, weve had two Referendums on this issue (one almost resulting in a Yes vote), and numerous Constit ...
    Related: canadian, canadian dollar, national assembly, unity, social problems
  • Cannery Row - 427 words
    Cannery Row The personal philosophy of any author cannot be excluded from his work. Although most refrain from proselytizing, a careful reading can usually reveal their ideology. John Steinbeck's novels and short stories reflect his romantic predisposition and his belief in socialism. In his novel, Cannery Row, Steinbeck considers the negative effects of our capitalistic system and celebrates the integrity of the common man. Cannery Row focuses on groups of people who live in a working-class community and shows how they affect each other. Each group represents different facets of American society. All of these components of society have many problems, which people go about trying to solve in ...
    Related: cannery, successful business, different ways, local government, solve
  • Chilean Economic Shock Therapy - 1,146 words
    Chilean Economic Shock Therapy Chile is seen to be the quintessential model of liberal restructuring in Latin America in the late twentieth century. After the overthrow of the socialist regime of Salvador Allende in 1973, Chiles government has implemented an authoritative economic restructuring program that replaced state intervention with market incentives and opened Chile to the global economy. This four-phase process transformed the economy from highly protective industrialized to an open free market economy based on agricultural exports. The process by which the Chilean economy was stabilized was termed shock therapy. Like other dramatic economic policy changes, the therapy caused the un ...
    Related: chilean, economic benefits, economic change, economic crisis, economic growth, economic policy, shock
  • China Economic Growth - 2,074 words
    China Economic Growth Two years after the death of Mao Zedong in 1976, it became apparent to many of China's leaders that economic reform was necessary. During his tenure as China's premier, Mao had encouraged social movements such as the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution, which had as their bases ideologies such as serving the people and maintaining the class struggle. By 1978 "Chinese leaders were searching for a solution to serious economic problems produced by Hua Guofeng, the man who had succeeded Mao Zedong as CCP leader after Mao's death" (Shirk 35). Hua had demonstrated a desire to continue the ideologically based movements of Mao. Unfortunately, these movements had left ...
    Related: china, chinese economic, economic crisis, economic development, economic growth, economic performance, economic reform
  • Chinese Economic Strategies - 1,903 words
    Chinese Economic Strategies Current Chinese economic strategies have blast the country into the world economy at full speed. While China's economy had been growing at nine percent a year over the past ten years, which led to China's gross domestic product to rise to the seventh in the world. However, with 1.3 billion people China remains a market with great potential for U.S. exporters. U.S. exports to China grew a meager two percent in 1996, but increased by 6.9 percent in 1997. The strongest growth in U.S. exports to China was in the services sector, which showed a positive trade balance in 1997 of $1.1 billion. In 1979 the Chinese have implemented numerous economic and political tactics t ...
    Related: chinese, chinese economic, chinese economy, chinese government, chinese market, chinese trade, economic benefits
  • Class, State, And Crime: Social Conflict Perspective - 1,129 words
    Class, State, And Crime: Social Conflict Perspective Michael Merchant Class: Social Psychology Class, State, and Crime : Social Conflict Perspective How does Class, state ,and social controls within a capitalistic society lead to increase crime due to the criminal laws and criminal justice system imposed on the lower middle class. Social conflict theory is the only one out of the vast number of criminology theories that deals directly with this problem. From out of it's Marxist roots arose a theory which challenges the way in which today's society views it's legal system and the implications it has on it's working class citizens. The nature and purpose of social conflict theories is to exami ...
    Related: conflict perspective, conflict theory, social change, social class, social conditions, social conflict, social control
  • Cuba: Crimes Against Human Rights - 2,006 words
    Cuba: Crimes Against Human Rights PART ONE CUBA: A Media Profile Media is the used around the world for the central purpose of sending and receiving information. To study the media in a country such as Cuba, you must consider the political, social and the cultural ideologies of the country. While most of the world is free flowing with information using mediums such as radio, television, the press and the Internet, Cuban people are exempted. The content within these mediums, reflect the ideologies of the Cuban government and also maintain a sense of nationalism. Information that reflects different ideologies of the Cuban government are not permitted on the island and are considered illegal. I ...
    Related: human rights, human rights watch, rights watch, fulgencio batista, important role
  • During The 1980s, Japan Had One Of The Most Profitable And Efficient Economies In The World But A Recent Recession Has Forced - 1,011 words
    ... all "Credit Crunch" of Japanese businesses (Daily Yomiuri, 1). And lastly he showed his intentions of injecting over 27 trillion yen into the economy to restore and stimulate consumer confidence and demand (Daily Yomiuri, 1). So as you can see, Japan is making efforts to address their social-economic problems from within as well. It may seem that Japan has the numerous strengths; including minimal military responciblity, strong markets for exports in the United States and United States assistance in both the global economy and domestic economies. These strengths may lead one to believe that the eventual restoration of the Japanese economy is inevitable. But this is not the case. The weak ...
    Related: economic recession, efficient, japan, profitable, recession
  • Fascist Germany - 1,957 words
    Fascist Germany The 1930s were turbulent times in Germany's history. World War I had left the country in shambles and, as if that weren't enough, the people of Germany had been humiliated and stripped of their pride and dignity by the Allies. Germany's dream of becoming one of the strongest nations in the world no longer seemed to be a possibility and this caused resentment among the German people. It was clear that Germany needed some type of motivation to get itself back on its feet and this came in the form of a charismatic man, Adolf Hitler. Hitler, a man who knew what he wanted and would do anything to get it, single-handedly transformed a weary Germany into a deadly fascist state. In o ...
    Related: fascist, germany, treaty of versailles, economic crisis, instability
  • Fascist Germany The Result Of Instability - 1,967 words
    Fascist Germany The Result of Instability Fascist Germany The Result of Instability The 1930s were turbulent times in Germany's history. World War I had left the country in shambles and, as if that weren't enough, the people of Germany had been humiliated and stripped of their pride and dignity by the Allies. Germany's dream of becoming one of the strongest nations in the world no longer seemed to be a possibility and this caused resentment among the German people. It was clear that Germany needed some type of motivation to get itself back on its feet and this came in the form of a charismatic man, Adolf Hitler. Hitler, a man who knew what he wanted and would do anything to get it, single-ha ...
    Related: fascist, germany, instability, adolf hitler, civil rights
  • Fdr - 284 words
    Fdr Franklin Delano Roosevelt, (1882-1945), 32nd President of the United States of the United States. Roosevelt became president in March 1933 at the depth of the Great Depression, was reelected for an unprecedented three more terms, and died in office in April 1945, less than a month before the surrender of Germany in World War II. Despite an attack of poliomyelitis, which paralyzed his legs in 1921, he was a charismatic optimist whose confidence helped sustain the American people during the strains of economic crisis and world war. He was one of America's most controversial leaders. Conservatives claimed that he undermined states' rights and individual liberty. Leftists found him timid and ...
    Related: american people, economic crisis, franklin delano roosevelt, administration
  • Federal Reserve Monetary Policy - 3,287 words
    Federal Reserve Monetary Policy If taxation without representation could rally the colonists against the British Crown in 1776, tight money and ruinous interest rates might be cause for populist revolt in our own day. Federal Reserve monetary policy also has severe social burdens, measured by huge changes in aggregate output, income, and employment. The imperious Fed, much like the English Crown two centuries ago, formulates and carries out its policy directives without democratic input, accountability, or redress. Not only has the Fed's monetary restraint at times deliberately pushed the economy into deep recession, with the attendant loss of millions of jobs, but also its impact on the str ...
    Related: economic policy, federal budget, federal funds, federal government, federal open market, federal open market committee, federal reserve
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