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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: eastern european

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  • Andy Warhols Impact On Art - 1,592 words
    Andy Warhol's Impact On Art andy warhol's impact on art Page 1 Andrew Warhola was born August Sixth, 1928, in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania. He was the youngest son of Julie and Andrej Warhola, both immigrants from Czechoslovakia. After a quiet childhood spent alternately alone and in art classes, Andrew went to college. He then got a job doing commercial art, largely advertisements for large companies. Over time his name was shortened and Andy Warhol changed the face of modern art. Through his silver lined Factory and the many people who frequented it a revolution was born. This paper will discuss some of these people and examine the impact they all made on modern art. Ruska Dolina was a small Ru ...
    Related: andy, andy warhol, eastern european, school dropout, span
  • Austria - 1,013 words
    ... balance of private and public enterprise. All the basic industries were nationalized in 1946; these included all oil production and refining; the largest commercial banks; and the principal companies in river and air transportation, railroad equipment, electric machinery and appliances, mining, iron, steel, and chemical manufacturing, and natural-gas and electric power production. Government control was reduced through lack of efforts in the late 1980s and early 1990s, allowing for the sale of shares in many nationalized companies to private investors. Austria has maintained close ties with the countries of Eastern Europe. Since the collapse of communism in those countries in the late 19 ...
    Related: austria, european union, eastern european, proportional representation, vested
  • Book Review: - 938 words
    BOOK REVIEW: The Magic Lantern, Timothy Garton Ash The Magic Lantern, Timothy Garton Ashs personal account of the revolutions of 1989 in Eastern Europe, is a detailed book written from the inside of the revolutions. Ash writes of the political transformation that takes place in Warsaw, Poland; Budapest, Hungary; Berlin, Germany; and Prague, Czechoslovakia. Ash gives great details of these events, and in some cases he own involvement in the revolutions. This book would be highly recommended to someone with previous knowledge of the history of these countries, or to those who are interested in other writings by the same author. I would not recommend it, however for any type of pleasure reading ...
    Related: book review, eastern europe, personal account, great wall, addresses
  • Cambodia - 1,930 words
    ... hildren were underfed. Hundreds of thousands of children are orphans or have only one surviving parent. The crisis of poverty, affecting children and adults alike, makes lone-term planning difficult, or impossible. Because of insecurity and a shortage of revenue, the State of Cambodia has been unable to keep Cambodia's roads, bridges, and railway system in good repair. Trips that before 1970 took less than an hour from Phnom Penh by car, on well-paved roads, now take over three hours, on roads from which the paving has almost disappeared. Rapid Social Change A third theme is that for many Cambodians, as for millions of other people elsewhere in the 1990's, everything is changing so rapid ...
    Related: cambodia, theravada buddhism, dairy products, consumer goods, alike
  • Cannabis - 1,627 words
    Cannabis Drug For the last few years, there has been much media hype about Cannabis. There have been talks about medical Marijuana, allowing farmers to use low THC types of marijuana for hemp, and completely legalizing Marijuana. The fiery debates have been brought to my attention by the media just recently. Being a teenager myself, I have become quite interested in Marijuana. Although most of my friends have tried Marijuana, and Marijuana is quite easily available where I lived in California, I have never tried it myself. I remember the time when my friend, Jeremy, was selling Marijuana right out of his locker. It was last year during PE, and I distinctly remember it. When I realized what h ...
    Related: cannabis, cannabis sativa, last year, south america, smoking
  • Cold War - 1,021 words
    Cold War Cold War My first inclination would be to answer the first question with a clear "YES". But come to think of it, the causes of war really have not changed at all, or at least very little. Rather than changes, there has been a shift in the causes. The cause of war which has dominated the last 50 years was the cause of ideology. However, due to the recent end of the Cold War, this cause of war, has significantly declined and is almost trivial. The causes of war have shifted from mainly ideological ones to economic, ethnic and others. Although these reasons have always played a role as causes of war throughout history, they were in the last 50 years overshadowed by the cause of ideolog ...
    Related: cold war, soviet union, foreign policy, last year, multinational
  • Communism East Europe - 3,047 words
    Communism East Europe TITLE: Why did communism collapse in Eastern Europe? SUBJECT: European Studies B EDUCATION: First year university GRADE: first honour AUTHOR'S COMMENTS: I liked it. Interested to hear other people's comments. TUTOR'S COMMENTS: Well done!! Extremely informative. Well researched. Good Layout. Stress Gorbachev's role more. Communism is like Prohibition - its a good idea but it wont work (Will Rogers, 1927) (1) This essay will give a brief introduction to communism. It will then discuss the various factors which combined to bring about the collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe. It will examine each of these factors and evaluate the effect of each. Finally it will attempt ...
    Related: communism, east europe, east germany, eastern europe, western europe
  • Communism East Europe - 3,045 words
    Communism East Europe TITLE: Why did communism collapse in Eastern Europe? SUBJECT: European Studies B EDUCATION: First year university GRADE: first honour AUTHOR'S COMMENTS: I liked it. Interested to hear other people's comments. TUTOR'S COMMENTS: Well done!! Extremely informative. Well researched. Good Layout. Stress Gorbachev's role more. Communism is like Prohibition - its a good idea but it wont work (Will Rogers, 1927) (1) This essay will give a brief introduction to communism. It will then discuss the various factors which combined to bring about the collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe. It will examine each of these factors and evaluate the effect of each. Finally it will attempt ...
    Related: communism, east europe, east germany, eastern europe, western europe
  • Communism In The World - 3,056 words
    ... ginning a nationwide offensive against the peasantry. Unknown millions died as a result. However, his industrial campains of the late 1930s enabled the Soviet Union to rise to the foremost rank of industrial powers. It was also during this time that Stalin enacted the Great Terror which killed millions. Millions more were sent to concentration camps. The fear of Stalin was carried out by his secret police called Komitet gosudarstvennoy bezopasnosti or KGB.Then an event happened that forever change the world's view of the Soviet Union. That event would be known as World War II. Stalin personnally led the assault on Germany that eventually resulted in the end of the war. The choice now was ...
    Related: after world, communism, third world, third world countries, world countries, world war ii, world wide
  • Control As Enterprise: Reflections On Privatization And Criminal Justice - 2,820 words
    Control As Enterprise: Reflections On Privatization And Criminal Justice Thank you very much for the welcome, and for giving my talk. When the Fraser Institute called me last year, they rang up and said they were having a conference and we would like to invite you, and I thought I think you have the wrong person. Basically, everybody else there, except myself and one person from Nova Scotia, were in favour of privatization and very strongly in favour of it, especially with respect to prisons. It was actually very educational and interesting to engage in that debate. First of all I would like to thank you very much for the invitation and to wish you all the best with your new programme. I am ...
    Related: crime control, criminal, criminal justice, justice system, privatization
  • Critique Of The Book Call It Sleep Written By Henry Roth - 1,110 words
    Critique of the book Call It Sleep written by Henry Roth The book Call It Sleep written by Henry Roth is a literary work that explores immigrant life as they adjust to the new and unfamiliar ways of American life. The book is somewhat of a social commentary on the period of the Eastern European immigration to America at its peak. The novel gives an inside view on how foreigners (primarily Jewish immigrants) fit into main stream society. Throughout the course of the novel, you travel along with the main character David Schearl as he ages from six to eight and grows up in Brownsville on the lower East side of New York. David is torn between the love of his over protective mother and the hatred ...
    Related: critique, roth, york harbor, make sense, temperament
  • Cuban Missile Crisis - 1,000 words
    Cuban Missile Crisis Cuban Missile Crisis During the administration of United States President John F. Kennedy, the Cold War reached its most dangerous state, and the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) came to the edge of nuclear war in what was known as the Cuban Missile Crisis. What was the Cold War? What started the tensions between the United States and the USSR? What actions were taken and how were the problems resolved? All of these questions and more shall be answered in this paper. The Cold War was a struggle between the United States and its allies and the Soviet Union. Although direct military conflict never took place, diplomatic and economic struggle ...
    Related: crisis, cuban, cuban missile, cuban missile crisis, missile, missile crisis
  • Cuban Missile Crisis - 1,184 words
    Cuban Missile Crisis The Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962 was the closest the world ever came to full-scale nuclear war. When the Soviet Union placed offensive nuclear missiles in Cuba, President Kennedy interpreted the act as one of hostility that would not be tolerated. However, the situation was blown way out or proportion by the president, American media, and ultimately the citizens of the United States. The Soviet Premier, Nikita Khrushchev, was reacting to the Bay of Pigs Invasion of Cuba, US Missile installations along the Turkey/Soviet border, and the clear anti-Communist policy of the United States. Khrushchev was born in Kalinovka in southwestern Russia. He was raised in a poor family ...
    Related: crisis, cuban, cuban missile, cuban missile crisis, missile, missile crisis
  • Democracy In Early Us - 757 words
    Democracy In Early U.S. Democratic government in the United States had its beginnings during the colonial period. The Mayflower Compact, House of Burgesses, New England Town Meetings, Fundamental Orders of Connecticut, and the Zenger trial each was an important step in the development of our democracy. For example, The Mayflower Compact was an agreement among the Pilgrims of Plymouth, to establish a body and to obey the rules of the governors they chose. The House of Burgesses was the Virginian parliament. Other colonies had such legislative bodies, too. The Burgesses were mainly colonists who preferred democracy to monarchy. They were often in conflict with the British government and the go ...
    Related: democracy, democracy in america, john peter, declaration of independence, establishment
  • Eastern Europe From 1970 To 1990 - 356 words
    Eastern Europe - From 1970 to 1990 From 1970 to 1990, Eastern European nations realized they needed a change in their governments as well as economies. Politically, reformers and dissidents wanted to end party-state dictatorships and move towards a pluralist democracy. Economically, centrally planned economies were unsuccessful due to increased bureaucracy, excessive centralization, and debt obligation. Velvet revolutions in Eastern Europe changed countries towards market-oriented economies and pluralist democracies. Countries of the Eastern European bloc had a similar goal in the 1970s and 1980s: to end party-state dictatorships. Under party-state dictatorships, one political party dominate ...
    Related: eastern, eastern europe, eastern european, lech walesa, free elections
  • Emerging Markets - 1,672 words
    Emerging Markets Abstract: Focuses on the United States government's policy on the Big Emerging Markets (BEM), which include the Chinese Economic Area, South Korea, Indonesia, India, South Africa, Poland, Turkey, Mexico, Brazil and Argentina. BEMs' investment on infrastructure projects; BEM's share of global gross domestic product; Projected increases in world imports; Lessons learned from the BEM strategy. THE BIG EMERGING MARKETS During his tenure as Under Secretary of Commerce, the author was one of the architects of the Clinton administration's Big Emerging Markets policy under Secretary of Commerce Ron Brown. He is now dean of the Yale School of Management. The Clinton policy emerged ou ...
    Related: emerging, emerging markets, markets, stock market, property rights
  • Holocaust - 1,496 words
    Holocaust What is the first thing that comes to mind when the phrase World War II is mentioned? The typical response to this question will almost always be Hitler and his cruelty toward Jews. What is strange about this answer, is the fact that the majority of people do not realize what actually occurred in Europe during this time. To most people, the Holocaust was an event where many Jews were killed by Nazis. In fact, the Holocaust was a tragic point in history which many believe never occurred, or do not realize the suffering behind the widespread destruction. The pain and conditions exper- ienced by the victims is unimaginable by any standards. In the early 1930s, the United States was re ...
    Related: holocaust, eastern european, concentration camps, civil service, phrase
  • Human Values And Ethics Vs Philisophical Ethics - 1,353 words
    ... nature and it's laws. He was arguing that everything in nature operates in conformity with certain rules and standards. More specifically, Kantian personal moral law -- "categorical imperative" says the following: "Act as if the maxim [that is the subjective governing principle] of your action were to become through your will a universal law of nature" (p. 31 Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals). Now, could you imagine what it would be like, if abortion had became 'a universal law of nature?' The existence of human species would come to an end. Therefore, I think that deontologists, based on the facts I've just given, would consider abortion in general as an immoral thing to do. Neve ...
    Related: ethics, human values, catholic church, roman catholic, fetus
  • Immigration - 693 words
    Immigration The second wave of immigrants to come to the United States came in from Southern or Eastern Europe. These immigrants came to the United States seeking better economic opportunities for their families. The economy of the United States was driven by the culture that resided in the area. In the Seattle area, the farming, ranching, logging and fishing industries drove the economy. This was mainly due to the huge growth of Oregon and Washington by settlers coming in from the European countries. The mining market of San Francisco also grew during this time because of the willingness of the immigrants to pursue hard-working, heavy labor jobs. The Hispanic population was primarily respon ...
    Related: immigration, catholic religion, ethnic background, san francisco, prejudice
  • Immigration - 1,688 words
    Immigration To US For many, immigration to the United States during the late 19th to early 20th century would be a new beginning to a prosperous life. However there were many acts and laws past to limit the influx of immigrants, do to prejudice, such as the Chinese Exclusion Act. Later on into the 20th century there would be laws repealing the older immigration laws and acts making it possible for many more foreigners to immigrate to the United States. Even with the new acts and laws that banned the older ones, no one can just walk right in and become a citizen. One must go through several examinations and tests before he or she can earn their citizenship. The Immigration Act of March 3, 189 ...
    Related: immigration, immigration laws, immigration reform, asia pacific, chinese exclusion act
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