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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: east german

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  • Anabolic Steroids - 1,862 words
    Anabolic Steroids Anabolic Steroid Use in the Olympics Canadian track star Ben Johnson was denied his gold medal in the 1988 Olympics after he tested positive for anabolic steroids. This incident sparked worldwide attention to the extent of anabolic steroid use. To date, the International Olympic Committee has barred the use of seventeen anabolic steroids. Other organizations, including The National Football League, National Collegiate Athletic Associations International Amateur Athletic Federation, and the International Federation of Body Builders have followed suit. Athletes and non-athletes alike are still abusing anabolic steroids to excel in sports. Anabolic steroids belong to a group o ...
    Related: anabolic, anabolic steroids, steroid use, steroids, works cited
  • Berlin Wall - 1,325 words
    Berlin Wall The Berlin Wall For twenty-eight years, the Berlin Wall separated friends, families, and a nation. After the second World War in 1945, the victorious Allies, the US, Britain, France, Russia divided Germany into four sectors, each under the control of an ally. The US, British, and French Sectors combined to form a democratic state, The Federal Republic of Germany, or West Germany. The Soviet sector became a communist state, The German Democratic Republic, or East Germany, on October 7, 1949. A barrier now separated east and West. Winston Churchill named this barrier the Iron Curtain. Even though Berlin lay deep within the Soviet sector, the Allies thought it best to divide this me ...
    Related: berlin, berlin wall, east berlin, border patrol, federal republic
  • Capitalism Vs Socialism - 1,084 words
    Capitalism Vs. Socialism In order to debate between Capitalism and Socialism, it is necessary to understand what the differences, advantages, and disadvantages are of both systems. Basically, Capitalism advocates private property, and that society does better when an individual can purchase and produce as they see fit. Socialism, in essence, is the theory that property ownership should reside in the hands of the government, and that the government can do more with the assets than individuals can. The difference between Capitalism and Socialism can be summed up by their definitions. They are based upon completely opposite philosophies. Capitalism is a political and economic system in which fa ...
    Related: capitalism, socialism, free market economy, health care, equality
  • Cold War - 1,247 words
    Cold War The Cold War With the aim of preventing East Germans from seeking asylum in the West, the East German government in 1961 began constructing a system of concrete and barbed-wire barriers between East and West Berlin. This Berlin Wall endured for nearly thirty years, a symbol not only of the division of Germany but of the larger conflict between the Communist and non-Communist worlds. The Wall ceased to be a barrier when East Germany ended restrictions on emigration in November 1989. The Wall was largely dismantled in the year preceding the reunification of Germany. The victorious Allies agreed to give most of Eastern Germany to Poland and the USSR, and then divide the rest into four ...
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  • Communism And Democracy - 845 words
    Communism And Democracy The United States of America is a country that believes in democracy and has unfavorable ties with communist countries. The United States has tried for decades to improve relations with the countries that dont practice democracy. History shows disagreements between the United States and dictators of these irreverent countries, disagreements that brought the world to the brink of nuclear war. The most recent of these confrontations involved three countries. United States of America, Cuba and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republic (USSR). Fidel Castro is a Cuban revolutionary, who took control of Cuba in 1959 and established a Communist dictatorship. Castro, who was bor ...
    Related: communism, democracy, u.s. government, president john, fidel
  • Communism East Europe - 2,955 words
    ... a contributing factor to the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe. If a party has not got the support of a majority, then it has a weak political basis. The fact that undemocratic means were used to ensure that the communists came to, and then maintained, power shows that communism was a political failure. Throughout the history of communism in Russia, never once did the party gain a majority support or truly succeed in suppressing public demonstrations of antipathy towards communism. It can therefore be argued that a political leadership with no political basis or support could ever hope to survive. Another important factor to note is communisms utter failure in relation to society a ...
    Related: century europe, communism, east europe, east european, east german, east germany, eastern europe
  • Cuban Missile Crisis - 1,000 words
    Cuban Missile Crisis Cuban Missile Crisis During the administration of United States President John F. Kennedy, the Cold War reached its most dangerous state, and the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) came to the edge of nuclear war in what was known as the Cuban Missile Crisis. What was the Cold War? What started the tensions between the United States and the USSR? What actions were taken and how were the problems resolved? All of these questions and more shall be answered in this paper. The Cold War was a struggle between the United States and its allies and the Soviet Union. Although direct military conflict never took place, diplomatic and economic struggle ...
    Related: crisis, cuban, cuban missile, cuban missile crisis, missile, missile crisis
  • Economic Transition In Poland Russia - 1,160 words
    ECONOMIC TRANSITION IN POLAND & RUSSIA Since approximately 1988, Poland and the republic of Russia (formerly Soviet Union) have gone through major economic reform. The main emphasis of this paper is to identify the different approaches that the governments in these two countries have taken and to look at the positive and negative effects that these drastic changes have had on their economies. Specifically, the question asked in this paper is, "Why has the economic transition in Poland been more successful than in Russia? We will be looking at what factors are being used to measure this success and what their prospects are for the future. With almost half of the world stayed under the communi ...
    Related: economic growth, economic reform, poland, russia, transition
  • Germany Analysis - 1,050 words
    Germany Analysis INDUSTRY IN GERMANY Country Issues Country issues related to Germany are addressed in four contexts. The areas of consideration are (1) cultural, social, and demographic trends and concerns, (2) political/governmental concerns, (3) exchange rate issues, and (4) macroeconomic issues. Cultural, Social, and Demographic Trends and Concerns Germany is the slightly larger then the combined size of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York. (137,691 square miles.) Germany is a nation of 81.5 million people (Hunter, 1997). The rate of population growth in Germany approximates one-percent per year. The head of the government is Chancellor Gerhard Schroder (elected on October 27,1998). The off ...
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  • Germany: The Answer To An Old Question Thesis: This Paper Will Argue That Germany Needs To Secure Itself As Both The Economic - 1,143 words
    Germany: The answer to an old Question Thesis: This paper will argue that Germany needs to secure itself as both the economic and political hegemon of Europe inside of the European Union; until its present condition and effectiveness in the global politics changes, instability in the European Union, as well as, basic fear of will always be present. I. Introduction II. Historical Perspective-The two negative factors A. Fear - twice in one century 1) Bismarck/Frederick II 2) Hitler B. Foolishness 1) WWI 2) WWII III. Reunification - The Key A. Economic realities 1) E. Germany's status 2) Infrastructure B. The significance of one Germany 1) Future 2) Politics IV. European Union-The means to and ...
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  • John F Kennedy - 637 words
    John F. Kennedy John F. Kennedy was president of the United States of America from 1961 to 1963. Once he was elected Khrushchev (the Russian leader who was a Communist) tried to test the young president and see how far he could push the new American president. While in office Kennedy faced many obstacles that he had to overcome. Quite a few of them were against the Russians who were communists. After the second World War , Germany was split up into two new nations. One which was being controlled by the Russians ,that was called East Germany. In East Germany there was a communist government. The other nation was being controlled by England , France , and the US ,that was called West Germany. ...
    Related: john f kennedy, kennedy, president kennedy, east germany, korean war
  • John Fitzgerald Kennedy 35th President Of The United States, The - 1,435 words
    ... e him in the next election, but he continued to speak out against segregation, the practice of separating people of different races. To a group of students in Nashville, Tennessee, he said, 9 "No one can deny the complexity of the problem involved in assuring all of our citizens their full rights as Americans. But no one can gainsay the fact that the determination to secure those rights is in the highest tradition of American freedom." In 1959, after several attempts, a revolution led by Fidel Castro finally overthrew the Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista y Zaldivar. During the next two years, Castro was to become increasingly hostile to the United States. The new regime's agricultural re ...
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  • Korean Unification - 1,619 words
    Korean Unification Ideas of the Korean Unification: Can They Learn From Germany's Experience? Introduction The idea of this paper is to compare and contrast German Unification process with the outlook for possible scenarios in Korea. By looking at the similarities and differences between the situation in Germany and Korea. To do this I look at the state of the economies, recommendations toward policy, the need for international support as well as possibilities on how to organize the transition. If the Republic of Korea and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea are to merge as one united country, several factors will need to be taken into question. I hope to bring light on what it might t ...
    Related: german unification, korean, korean peninsula, north korean, south korean, unification
  • Star Appliances Inc 5 Year Plan - 4,463 words
    Star Appliances Inc. - 5 Year Plan Table of Contents Mission Statement Company Objectives Company Overview 1. Historical Outline 2. Products and Services 3. Financial Statements SWOT Analysis An analysis of companys strengths An analysis of companys weaknesses An analysis of companys opportunities An analysis of companys threats Business Strategy Marketing Mix Product Pricing Place Promotion Analysis of Major Competitors in the Field Kenmore Whirlpool Kirby Maytag GE International Expansion 1. Hungary External Environment Industry Analysis Recommended Entry Mode 2. Japan External Environment Industry Analysis Expansion Strategy for the Future Five Years 4. Canada External ...
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  • The Berlin Wall - 1,207 words
    The Berlin Wall The Berlin Wall The Berlin Wall, built in August of 1961, was a physical symbol of the political and emotional divisions of Germany. The Wall was built because of a long lasting suspicion among the Soviet Union on one side and Western Europe and the United States on the other. Once World War II was over, these Allies no longer had a common purpose to hold them together. Their differences became less hidden and more irreconcilable. The Western Allies quickly realized they couldn't "kick a dog when its already down", and that Germany was in desperate need of help." Therefore, the Allies' aim was to rebuild Germany's economy. The Soviet Union disagreed with this plan immensely, ...
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  • The Birth Of The Western European Union Began Some 28 Years - 1,968 words
    The birth of the Western European Union began some 28 years ago on May 6th 1955. However, this alliance was formed from the original Treaty of Dunkirk. The Treaty of Dunkirk was an Anglo-French alliance which was signed on March 4th 1947, when the two signatories agreed to give mutual support to each other should the event of renewed German aggression show it's face again. It was also to agree on a common action should either signatory be prejudiced by any failure of Germany to fulfil it's economic obligations which were enforced upon her by the allies at the end of WWII. The Treaty of Dunkirk was enhanced within only 12 months with the signing of The Brussels Treaty. This was a "Treaty of E ...
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  • The Birth Of The Western European Union Began Some 28 Years - 2,031 words
    ... when in 1987 the WEU membership expanded to nine with the inclusion of Spain and Portugal due to their membership in the EC, this lead to Washington issuing a warning that "Atlantic co-operation must take priority over developments among West Europeans themselves. In 1991 a U.S. call for a stronger Western European role within the alliance was matched with a warning about the adverse impact of moves towards a European discussion on America's role within Europe. Visits to Europe by U.S. officials cautioned European governments against any practical steps towards a separate European Defence Identity. This did however embarrass some as an intervention in preempting any European debate on th ...
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  • The Cia - 1,764 words
    The Cia CIA: The Black Sheep of the US Government Thinking in the philosophical terms of "good" and "evil," nothing purely "good" can survive without the slightest taint of "evil," and vice-versa. The same standard exists for everything. Just as you cannot always succeed by being purely honest, a government cannot hold itself together without committing it's own personal rights and wrongs. The United States of America has protected its residents well in the past, and kept the appearance of a mild innocense; well, most of it, anyway. The Covert Intelligence Agency (CIA) is mostly swamped in its wrongs, though many have not even been proven. The CIA has been this country's "yang" to protect th ...
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  • The Reasons For The Fall Of Socialismcommunism And The Troubles - 1,542 words
    The Reasons for the fall of Socialism/Communism and the Troubles of Starting the New Democratic System in the Russian Federation "Let's not talk about Communism. Communism was just an idea, just pie in the sky." Boris Yeltsin (b. 1931), Russian politician, president. Remark during a visit to the U.S. Quoted in: Independent (London, 13 Sept. 1989). The fall of the Communist regime in the Soviet Union was more than a political event. The powerful bond between economics and politics that was the integral characteristic of the state socialist system created a situation that was unique for the successor states of the Soviet Union. The Communist regime was so ingrain in every aspect of Soviet life ...
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  • Why Did Both Hungary In 1956 And Czechoslovakia In 1968 Rebel Against Soviet Domination - 1,200 words
    Why did both Hungary in 1956 and Czechoslovakia in 1968 rebel against Soviet Domination? Why did both Hungary in 1956 and Czechoslovakia in 1968 rebel against Soviet Domination? The causes for such a massive and all-captivating rebellion, which occurred both in Hungary (1956) and in Czechoslovakia (1968), originated most from deep-rooted antagonism towards Soviet domination in the Eastern Europe in the post-war era. A continuous political and cultural suppression by Soviet dictatorial policies, obviously linked with economic constraints, coalesced to provoke robust insurrections. Short-term reasons are of no less importance in the analysis of these events. In the case of Hungary, Khrushchevs ...
    Related: czechoslovakia, domination, hungary, rebel, soviet, soviet union
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