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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: early years

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  • Louis Armstrong: His Childhood, And Early Years Of His Music - 1,095 words
    Louis Armstrong: His Childhood, And Early Years Of His Music Brian McLaughlin History of Jazz 12/18/98 Professor Torff Louis Armstrong: His childhood, and the early years of his music He was born in the south at a time when a black boy could expect nothing but to grow up, work hard at the lowest jobs all his life, and hope somehow, somewhere manage to stay healthy and get a little out of life.(P.1 Collier) Get a little out of life Louis did, a pure genius he revolutionized America's first true form of art, jazz. Doing a paper on Louis Armstrong has been enjoyable to do and the information that is available on Armstrong is endless. So much that this paper is going to concentrate on Louis Chil ...
    Related: early years, louis, louis armstrong, music, music career
  • Louis Armstrong: His Childhood, And Early Years Of His Music - 1,039 words
    ... re King Oliver was playing and would show up and ask to carry his bag and help out with other things. King Oliver started to help Louis out with his cornet. King Oliver recognized his talent and gave Lois jobs that he couldn't take. Storyville had closed and there was a mass exodus of musicians going North to Chicago. King Oliver Louis' mentor left while Louis stayed behind; he still didn't earn enough from his music to support himself. He took over King Olivers position in Kid Ory's band and made a name for himself around Chicago. He landed a job in Fat Marable's Orchestra and finally learned to read music. This also meant that Louis had to leave New Orleans in order to travel up and do ...
    Related: early years, louis, louis armstrong, music, music business
  • The State Of Spain During The Early Years Of The 20th Century Can Be Said To Have Been A State Of Great Unease Spain Was One - 910 words
    The state of Spain during the early years of the 20th century can be said to have been a state of great "unease". Spain was one of the first powers to loose her imperial influence, the state was politically unstable, industrially weak and had suffered some humiliating defeats. It can be said that these were the main causes that lead to the great instability of Spain during the Civil war and post civil war periods. Left-winged radicalism and nationalistic movements, such as the Catalan movement frequently came into conflict with the central government, which lead the government to use corruption more and more frequently as a form of control. The result was a military coup in 1923 lead by Migu ...
    Related: early years, spain, civil war, nazi germany, converge
  • 1984 Televisions Vs Telescreens - 1,437 words
    1984 Televisions Vs Telescreens 1984 Televisions Vs Telescreens TV rots the senses in the head! It kills the imagination dead! It clogs and clutters up the mind! It makes a child so dull and blind. He can no longer understand a fantasy, A fairyland! His brain becomes as soft as cheese! His powers of thinking rust and freeze! An excerpt from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, By Roald Dahl, 1964 When George Orwells epic novel 1984 was published in 1949 it opened the publics imagination to a future world where privacy and freedom had no meaning. The year 1984 has come and gone and we generally believe ourselves to still live in "The Land of the Free;" however, as we now move into the 21st Cent ...
    Related: 1984, american television, television programming, violence on television, negative consequences
  • A Comparison Of Freud And Fromm - 1,277 words
    A Comparison Of Freud And Fromm Sigmund Freud was born in Monrovia on May 6,1856. He entered the University of Vienna in 1873 at the age of 17. He finished his degree in 1881. Freud died in England in 1939. He was an active therapist, theorist and writer to the very end. ( Ewen 19-20) Erich Fromm was born four years after Freud in 1900 in Frankfurt, Germany. Unlike Freud, Fromm had no medical training in his background. He received his PHD from the University of Heidelberg and later studied at Berlin Psychoanalytic Institute. Erich Fromm died March 16, 1980 in Switzerland. (Ewen 187) While Freud and Fromm were contemporaries and shared some basic beliefs, their approach to most issues varied ...
    Related: comparison, erich fromm, freud, fromm, sigmund freud
  • A Cultural Approach - 964 words
    A Cultural Approach The cultural and developmental aspects of American history in the 17th and 18th centuries are certainly among the most important and influential factors in the shaping of this country's long and storied history. Historiographically speaking, there are undoubtedly thousands upon thousands of different studies and opinions on the most influential cultural strides of early Americans well as the pros and cons that each colonial region developed in shaping America and readying it for the Revolutionary Era. Each of these four studies brings a slightly different and even, at times, conflicting approach to analyzing the cultural and social roots of early America, but each one pro ...
    Related: colonial period, urban areas, middle america, dynamic, portion
  • Adolf Hitler - 1,279 words
    ADOLF HITLER Adolf Hitler changed the course of history. His childhood strongly shaped his personality. There were many deciding factors that determined the kind of person Hitler finally became. Adolf's father was Alois, an illegitimate child, his mother was Marie Schickulgruber. Alois took his fathers name Hitler before Adolf was born. Alois was already a successful border guard when he was 18, and later became an Austrian customs official. He retired in 1849 after 40 years of service. He was 58 and retired early because of bad health. After he retired he bought a nine acre farm near the small town of Hafeld. His dream was to live a country life, but the farm took much more work than he exp ...
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  • Aggression Biological Theory Vs Behaviorist Theory - 1,254 words
    Aggression - Biological Theory vs Behaviorist Theory Aggression is a problem that affects all members of society. There is no doubt that aggression pays off for some. Parents who yell and threaten punishment get results. The child who hits the hardest gets the toy. The brother who is willing to be the most vicious in a fight wins. The teacher who gives the hardest test and threatens to flunk the most students usually gets the most study time from students. The spouse who threatens to get the maddest gets their way. The male who acts the most macho and aggressive gets the praise of certain groups of males. For decades psychologists have attempted to find the causes of aggression. The focus of ...
    Related: aggression, aggression in children, behaviorist, biological, biological factors
  • Aids Related Stigma Since The Appearance Of Aids In The Late Seventies And Early Eighties, The Disease Has Had Attached To It - 1,545 words
    AIDS Related Stigma Since the appearance of AIDS in the late seventies and early eighties, the disease has had attached to it a significant social stigma. This stigma has manifested itself in the form of discrimination, avoidance and fear of people living with AIDS (PLWAs). As a result, the social implications of the disease have been extended from those of other life threatening conditions to the point at which PLWAs are not only faced with a terminal illness but also social isolation and constant discrimination throughout society. Various explanations have been suggested as to the underlying causes of this stigmatization. Many studies point to the relationship the disease has with deviant ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, early years, seventies, stigma
  • Albert Einstein - 1,216 words
    Albert Einstein Albert Einstein Albert Einstein was one of the greatest brains ever to come to the 20th century. Einstein contributed to the 20th century more than any other scientist ever. His theory of relativity is held as the highest quality of a human thought ever to come. Albert Einstein was born on March 14, 1879 in Ulm, Wurttemberg, Germany. His family moved from Ulm to Munich and had an unsuccessful business that made them move later to Milan, Italy. His parents were dealing with electrical apparatus. At this time Albert left his German citizenship. He persuades an exam that would give him the opportunity to study electrical engineering in Zurich Polytechnic but failed to pass it. A ...
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  • Alcoholism - 977 words
    Alcoholism In Young Age Alcoholism and alcohol abuse is a growing problem in our society. Daily, people are injured and killed in alcohol-related accidents and this has an effect on each and every person as a result of these occurrences. Whether we are personally involved or have directly suffered from the activities of someone who is under the influence of alcohol, we all suffer from the negative consequences of alcohol. Since we have those who choose to abuse these privileges we need to develop consequences for them. By learning what leads people to drink alcohol, and how this affects their lives, we can then determine what actions need to be taken to help remove ourselves from our ever-in ...
    Related: alcoholism, school students, alcohol abuse, high school, emotionally
  • Although Musicians Had Been Recording Fiddle Tunes Known As Old Time Music At That Time In The - 4,509 words
    ... ves' career. In 1959, Reeves recorded his all-time greatest hit, "He'll Have to Go." The theme was familiar enough. Some years earlier it might have been called a honky-tonk song. But the treatment, with Reeves' dark, intimate, velvet tones gliding over a muted backing, was something different again. The result brought him instant stardom. During the early 1960s, he also continued to dominate the US country charts, with hits including Guilty (1963), and "Welcome to My World" (1964). Tragically, on a flight back to Nashville from Arkansas on July 31, 1964, Jim and his manager ran into heavy rain just a few miles from Nashville's Beery Field and crashed, killing both men. Voted into the Co ...
    Related: country music, music, music hall, music history, music industry, pop music, recording
  • Amenhotep Iv - 2,420 words
    ... man who enjoys intellectual pleasures over traditional manly pleasures such as hunting. A young man who may not be strong and sure of himself as ruler. Yet there are those around him, priests of Amen, who are strong politically and financially and wish to stay that way. No matter who is in power. Will this situation have an affect on the reign of Akhenaten? His first few years show no great revolutionary intentions. He makes his sister Nefertity his queen. Like his mother, his queen is a strong and influential woman. She appears almost trice as many times as her husband in the talatats. And she is seen holding a sword or club. We will discuss the role of Akhenaten and his family life lat ...
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  • Americans In Civil War - 1,083 words
    ... hting for the North and trying to escape the bonds of slavery and gain freedom, discrimination still existed in the Army. The soldiers fought in segregated companies with white commanders. The Blacks were not equal to the whites as they received lower pay, performed fatigue duty and menial labor, such as cleaning quarters, laundering clothing, cleaning boots and cooking. Black soldiers, regardless of their rank, earned $10 a month minus $3 for clothing, while white privates earned $13 a month plus clothing. Ex-slaves could not advance into the ranks of commissioned officers until the end of the war. Batty and Parish note that less than 100 ever became officers and none ranked higher than ...
    Related: african american, civil war, nat turner, mifflin company, foner
  • Anthropologists - 334 words
    Anthropologists Anthropologists trace the origin and evolutionary development of the human race through the study of changing physical characteristics and cultural and social institutions. Anthropological data, including that acquired by archeological techniques, may be applied to solving problems in human relations such as race and ethnic relations and education. People have always been interested in their past history. Although anthropology dates back to Aristotle, it is a commonly accepted fact that it became an established science during the Victorian era or the era of exploration. Anthropology has developed slowly since then with little real development until the 1930's when the use of ...
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  • Arthur Miller And Tennessee Williams, Including A Streetcar Named Desire - 4,340 words
    Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams, including A Streetcar Named Desire (1947, film, 1951) and Death of a Salesman (1949). He directed the Academy Award-winning films Gentleman's Agreement (1947) and On The Waterfront (1954), as well as East of Eden (1955), A Face in the Crowd (1957), Splendor in the Grass (1961), and The Last Tycoon (1976). His two autobiographical novels, America, America (1962) and The Arrangement (1967), were turned into films in 1963 and 1968. Bibliography: Koszarski, Richard, Hollywood Directors, 1941-1976 (1977). Jolson, Al -------------------------------- (johl'-suhn) The singer Al Jolson, b. Asa Yoelson in Lithuania, c.1886, d. Oct. 23, 1950, immigrated with his fa ...
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  • Attachment Theory - 1,027 words
    Attachment Theory Attachment Theory Attachment or bonding is the developing relationship established between a primary caregiver, usually the mother, and her child. Attachment behaviors begin early in life. This narrow age limit is often called the critical period. This trusting relationship developed in infancy forms the foundation for a child's development. If a child has a secure attachment, he will grow up to view the world as a safe place and will be able to develop other emotions. It has become more and more apparent that a healthy attachment is most important in human development. Why do some children survive and even rebound in the face of adversity? Some children are able to adapt a ...
    Related: attachment, attachment theory, social workers, individual development, bonding
  • Bach, John Sebastian - 671 words
    Bach, John Sebastian Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Johann Sebastian Bach is probally one of the greatest composers of his time, as well as our time. As a boy he had a fantastic soprano singing voice and always took the lead roles in the church and school choirs. He started composing fairly early on in his life and his first main works, including the Preludes and Variations for the organ, were composed between the ages of 17 and 20. Bach loved church music and was regarded as one of the finest organists of his day. Since he was raised up with strong ties to the church, he was always involved in church music both as a singer and an organist. He wrote many of his marvelous series of cantata ...
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  • Beethoven, Berloiz, And Chopin - 1,380 words
    ... she was in financial hardship so she decided to meet Berlioz. She saw him as a way out of debt, so on October 3, 1833, they were married. In December, he gave a performance of King Lear, after which Paganini gave him great praise, and they developed a friendship. Berlioz wrote a piece for him and turned it into Harold in Italy. In 1834, they had a son, Louis. Harriet's acting career failed, and her beauty and health were fading fast. She soon began drinking and was turning into a shrew. Berlioz could not deal with her anymore, and moved out and took a mistress named Marie Recio, and opera singer. The next few years after that, he traveled a lot with success in Germany, Russia and London ...
    Related: chopin, yellow fever, george sand, early years, rondo
  • Ben Franklin - 1,679 words
    Ben Franklin Ben Franklin was the definition of the self-made man. He began his career as a simple apprentice for a printer (his brother) following leaving school at the age of 10, but he and his writings went far beyond the shop where he first started. He spent the early years of his life as a printer, moralist, essayist, scientist, inventor, and a philosopher. He later went on to become a civic leader, statesman, and diplomat. Upon man of those careers he was a strong force in developing the new nation of America. His political views showed him to be a man who loved freedom and self-government. His common sense, his whit, and his ability to negotiate behind the scenes lent a hand in the fo ...
    Related: benjamin franklin, franklin, british empire, university press, presidency
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