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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: absolute truth

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  • 12 Angry Men - 485 words
    12 Angry Men A persons surroundings can influence him. In 12 Angry Men by Reginald Rose a young mans life is held by twelve men with contrasting views. After hearing, the case the jurors go into deliberations. Eleven of the 12 are convinced that the boy murdered his father. However, Juror # 8 a caring man, who wishes to talk about why the other jurors think that the boy is guilty, clashes with Juror # 3, a sadistic man who would pull the switch himself to end the boys life. Early on, it's not revealed why #3 feels so strongly about putting the boy to death. He is just so dead set on killing him though. But because of Juror # 8, the others must now go over the whole case again to review the f ...
    Related: angry, reasonable doubt, reginald rose, contrasting views, sadistic
  • 3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults - 1,932 words
    ... Evil Deeds done on Earth, VII. Eternal Progress Open to every Human Soul. (Spiritualism) Spiritualists are often accused of being atheists or Anti-Christian, yet our first Principle recognizes God as our Father; but who is God?. Spiritualism is universal religion recognizing such leaders as Buddha, Mohammed, Moses as well as Jesus. It does not however, claim a monopoly of Religion. Ones religion is a personal matter and any person adopting Spiritualism is free to interpret the principles according to their own awareness. Furthermore, they do not believe in a Vindictive God. They are their own judges and they shall receive compensation or retribution for what ever they have done whether ...
    Related: human soul, psychological effects, encarta online, accused, steven
  • A Literary Critique Of C S Lewis: The Case For Christianity, The Worlds Last Night - 1,046 words
    ... s,"If there was a controlling power outside the universe, it could not show itself to us as one of those facts inside the universe- no more than an architect of a house could actually be a wall or staircase or fireplace in that house."4 The concept of a good power or mind is misleading. When God is referred to as good, the immediate thought is a warm loving personality. Lewis referred to this good as representative of truth. The law of nature is defined by what man ought to do or as absolute truth. When one acts according to what they ought to do, the law of nature has no consideration of how painful or dangerous it might be. This good which Lewis argued for is cold and hard, without per ...
    Related: critique, free will, absolute truth, c. s. lewis, efficacy
  • All The Kings Men: Historys Importance - 1,225 words
    All the King's Men: History's Importance Throughout All the King's Men, history plays an important role in the motivations and lives of all the characters. History's importance is most noticeable, not surprisingly, in the story main characters - Willie Stark and Jack Burden - whose lives focus on and, in some cases, depend upon history and how they relate themselves to it. While Willie Stark views history as a tool with which to manipulate people for his own ends, an attitude resulting in his own destruction, Jack Burden's view of history changes over time and eventually allows him to accept his relationship to the past and, therefore, present. Since each man has such a differing view it is ...
    Related: cause and effect, important role, different ways, history, update
  • Anais Nin - 1,631 words
    Anais Nin Anais Nin was a passionate woman, not only in her works but also in her life. The fact that she lived life to the fullest is what made her books so intriguing. Although her diaries were a chronicle of her experience, her fiction showed the reader sides of her while displaying everyone's innermost desires. In her own words Nin says, "the role of the writer is not to say what we can all say, but what we are unable to say" (Rollins), and she does exactly that. For this reason her works take one on a journey through one's soul and allows the pondering which may never have been considered. This feeling of self discovery is quite powerful and erotic; the enpowerment supplies a feeling of ...
    Related: ethan frome, good company, literary device, surrealism, walsh
  • Appleby Book Review - 781 words
    Appleby Book Review October 20, 2000 Telling The Truth About History I am writing a book review of Telling The Truth About History by Joyce Appleby, Lynn Hunt and Margaret Jacob. In this book, the authors' talk about the increased skepticism and the position that relativism has lessen our ability to actually know and to write about the past. The book discusses the writing of history, and how people are struggling with the issues of what is "truth." It also discusses the postmodernist movement and how future historians can avoid the mistakes by historians from the past. Telling The Truth About History gives great insight and knowledge to those who are non-historians because it looks at the di ...
    Related: appleby, book reports, book review, united states history, absolute truth
  • Book Review Suprises Of Christian Way - 1,055 words
    Book Review - Suprises Of Christian Way Chapter 1 At least in Lithuania, God is a problem for many people exactly how D.Shenk has described in his book. An old man sitting upstairs watching people and trying to punish them for whatever bad they may do. There are probably two main reasons for that. One would be the post soviet dark period when government was trying to forbid religion and parents at the same time were telling their children to do what God says and not listen to what the soviet regime tells to do. To encourage that, parents talked about punishment of God in case their children would act improperly. The second main reason I think is Catholic Church history, related to executions ...
    Related: book review, christian, daily life, adam and eve, insects
  • Buddhist Ethics - 1,163 words
    ... such as Christianity or Islam. Buddhism is more a way of life and a learning process than a set of divine commands. This essay will define, describe, and analyze the ethics of the Buddhist religion. It will present the reader with the basic principles and truths of Buddhism. It will begin with information on the origin of Buddhism and some details on the life of its founder, Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha. Also it will explain the beliefs and moral behaviors of Buddhists. Siddhartha Gautama, later known in his life as the Buddha, meaning the Enlightened or Awakened One, was born around 563 B.C.E. He was born and raised in what is now known as Nepal, near the Himalayan Mountains. He belo ...
    Related: buddhist, ethics, noble eightfold path, major religions, tree
  • Computer Ethics - 1,216 words
    ... different classroom procedures for exposing students to the abstract subject of computer users' ethical behavi! or. The author prefers presenting scenarios for discussions. However, all faculty members do not dive into the waters of a new teaching model.' Some prefer to stay with a teaching style that is comfortable and familiar. Therefore, what the author believes is the most desirable approach may not be everybody's approach. Before enumerating three methods for teaching the subject of ethical standards, the computer- specific ethical issues are as follows: 1. Storing and processing data. Should and unauthorized use of otherwise unused computer services or information stored in comput ...
    Related: code of ethics, computer ethics, computer information, computer program, computer services, computer systems, ethics
  • Creationism - 1,390 words
    Creationism Creationism is a religious metaphysical theory about the origin of the universe. It is not a scientific theory. Technically, creationism is not necessarily connected to any particular religion. It simply requires a belief in a Creator. Millions of Christians and non-Christians believe there is a Creator of the universe and that scientific theories such as the the theory of evolution do not conflict with belief in a Creator. However, fundamentalist Christians such as Ronald Reagan and Jerry Falwell, have co-opted the term 'creationism' and it is now difficult to refer to creationism without being understood as referring to fundamentalist Christians who (a) take the stories in Gene ...
    Related: creationism, natural selection, scientific facts, stephen jay gould, certainty
  • Decline Of Catholicism Oral - 1,138 words
    ... alvation came we are one of the ways to salvation.This new open mindedness in the catholic church appealed to Catholics and drew new membership. Catholicism before the council was not so stable, the church appeared to be solid rooted and unchanged :fish on Friday; mass on Sunday in Latin etc. But then almost over night it was all right to eat meat on Friday, Mass was said in English with the priest facing the people etc. Greeley states 'Catholicism in America is more healthy and alive today than it was before Vatican 2.'America is a society engulfed in a culture of the American Dream, in pursuit of the almighty dollar. Reeves states "We are consumed by our jobs and endless pursuit of the ...
    Related: catholicism, decline, oral, national survey, public school
  • Early History Of The Celts - 1,979 words
    ... te with the gods only through the Druids, except for the divine father god of the tuath - any member of his tuath was able to contact him. The Druids were very appreciated and very influential and powerful. They were the teachers, doctors, and lawyers of Celtic society. But of these two orders, one is that of the Druids, the other that of the knights. The former are engaged in things sacred, conduct the public and the private sacrifices, and interpret all matters of religion. To these a large number of the young men resort for the purpose of instruction, and they [the Druids] are in great honour among them. For they determine respecting almost all controversies, public and private; and i ...
    Related: celts, early history, history, human beings, mother goddess
  • Everything Is Not Always As It Seems - 1,060 words
    Everything Is Not Always As It Seems In the novel, Bel-Ami, Guy de Maupassant uses symbolism quite frequently. Many of the smallest details are completely enthralled with symbolism. Maupassant uses people, inanimate objects, and situations to portray some aspects of his life or simply of French society in general. On the surface, Bel-Ami is a great book, but deeper into the pages lies a whole different world. Webster's New World Dictionary defines symbolism as the representation of things by use of symbols, especially in art or literature. This definition strikes me as a very vague description. Symbolism to me is a sort of art form. It is not a very difficult task to tell someone information ...
    Related: french society, life issues, absolute truth, christ, bread
  • Evolution Of Paradigm Christianity And The Discovery Of The Individual - 1,144 words
    Evolution Of Paradigm; Christianity And The Discovery Of The Individual I cannot forgive Descartes. In all his philosophy he would have been quite willing to dispense with God. But he had to make Him give a fillip to set the world in motion; beyond this, he has no further need of God. ~ Blaise Pascal, Penses, number 77 Cosmology itself speaks to us of the origins of the universe and its makeup, not in order to provide us with a scientific treatise but in order to state the correct relationship of man with God and with the universe. Sacred Scripture wishes simply to declare that the world was created by God, and in order to teach this truth, it expresses itself in the terms of the cosmology i ...
    Related: christianity, discovery, evolution, paradigm, absolute truth
  • Existentialism - 1,657 words
    ... I can now term the Underground Man (thanks to this class!). That was when I was overly conscious, hyper-aware, and very insecure. I was far from the state of the Underground Man, but surely in the initial stages of paranoid-schizophrenia! My thoughts seemed diseased. Not that consciousness itself was a disease, but that my heightened awareness was in some way poisoned. Thus I feel Dostoevsky (when I say Dostoevsky I am speaking of his Underground Man) is wrong to call consciousness a disease. His disgusting thoughts are not the product of higher consciousness but of a diseased mind. His thoughts are not normal; this is what I believe. Dostoevsky admits right away that he is more intelli ...
    Related: existentialism, higher level, black hole, modern medicine, focuses
  • Galileo - 533 words
    Galileo After reading this letter I feel that Galileo had a very opinionated outlook on life and was heavily involved in a struggle for freedom of inquiry. Galileo was a person who had many strong beliefs and would not let people or a document have a say in what he believes. I think that according to Galileo an individual gains knowledge of nature threw observation. Galileo believed no one really went out into the world as he did and used the senses that God gave us when we where created, to observe the physical world. He was a very persistent individual and was always looking further into what he observed our read. Many people went along with how he gained knowledge of nature but the few wh ...
    Related: galileo, the bible, people believe, different meanings, differently
  • Herman Hesse - 1,870 words
    Herman Hesse Herman Hesse is one of the worlds most necessary writers. Until winning the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1946, however, he was virtually unknown outside of German speaking countries. Since then he has been an icon for the young every where because of his ability to communicate the same struggles that many aspiring students face. Many of his characters (often sharing his initials, i.e. Harry Haller of Steppenwolf) struggle within a world that seeks to extinguish individual creativity. Born in 1877 to a Protestant family in southern Germany, Hesse from the beginning was a square peg trying to fit into a round hole. Perhaps it should be noted that his goal was to be a well-rounded ...
    Related: herman, herman hesse, hesse, southern germany, men and women
  • Hitler And Stalin - 1,047 words
    Hitler And Stalin During the period leading up to World War II, there were two famous dictators who were on opposing sides, yet had similar records. These men were Adolph Hitler and Joseph Stalin. They were each triumphant in their rise to power in their countries and they were very comparable in the ways that they succeeded. Their success was mostly attributed to their new ideas and their politics. Although Hitler and Stalin hated each other, the two leaders were similar in many ways. Hitler and Stalin each rose to the highest position attainable in their respective countries, and there were three main reasons that they were able to do this. Both men were skilled users of propaganda, each w ...
    Related: adolf hitler, adolph hitler, hitler, joseph stalin, stalin
  • Hitler And Stalin: The Rise To Power - 1,850 words
    Hitler and Stalin: the rise to power During the period leading up to World War II, there were two men who were on opposing sides, yet had many traits that made them much alike. One of these men was someone whos name is instantly recognizable to almost anyone today--Adolf Hitler. The other man was a major player in world history as well, but his name is not so infamous--Joseph Stalin. These men were each triumphant in their rise to power in their countries and they were very comparable in the ways that they succeeded. Their success was mostly attributed to their new ideas and, especially in Hitlers case, their politics. Although Hitler and Stalin hated each other, the two leaders were similar ...
    Related: adolf hitler, hitler, communist party, world history, aspiration
  • How Does Descartes Try To Extricate Himself From The Sceptical Doubts That He Has Raised Does He Succeed - 2,342 words
    ... llows: "If a conviction is so firm that that it is impossible for us ever to have any reason for doubting what we are convinced of, then there are no further questions for us to ask; we have everything we could reasonably want." Under my interpretation, this is what it is about the cogito that makes it so important for Descartes, so we cannot have any argument with the principle expressed by him in the above passage. But can it help break the circle? When we clearly and distinctly perceive something, Descartes says, fairly I think, that this perception compels our assent, that we cannot but believe it. God's rle in the system, to these commentators, is as a guarantor of our memory regard ...
    Related: descartes, succeed, make sense, western philosophy, grant
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