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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: dysfunctional

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  • Ordinary People Ordinary People By Judith Guest Is The Story Of A Dysfunctional Family - 1,301 words
    Ordinary People Ordinary People by Judith Guest is the story of a dysfunctional family who relate to one another through a series of extensive defense mechanisms, i.e. an unconscious process whereby reality is distorted to reduce or prevent anxiety. The book opens with seventeen year old Conrad, son of upper middle-class Beth and Calvin Jarrett, home after eight months in a psychiatric hospital, there because he had attempted suicide by slashing his wrists. His mother is a meticulously orderly person who, Jared, through projection, feels despises him. She does all the right things; attending to Jared's physical needs, keeping a spotless home, plays golf and bridge with other women in her soc ...
    Related: dysfunctional, dysfunctional family, guest, judith, ordinary, ordinary people
  • A Rose, The Universal Symbol Of Love - 637 words
    A Rose, the Universal Symbol of Love In William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily, Miss Emily Grierson is a lonely old woman, living a life void of all love and affection; although the rose only directly appears in the title, the rose surfaces throughout the story as a symbol. In contemporary times, the rose also symbolizes emotions like love and friendship. The rose symbolizes dreams of romances and lovers. These dreams belong to women, who like Emily Grierson, have yet to experience true love for themselves. Throughout the life of Emily Grierson, she remains locked up, never experiencing love from anyone but her father. She lives a life of loneliness, left only to dream of the love missing from ...
    Related: true love, rose for emily, william faulkner, contemporary times, teaches
  • Abortion - 1,380 words
    Abortion Home and Family Paper Prewrite family, bedroom. kitchen, bathroom, cousins, aunts and uncles, parents, guardians, marriage, what is a marriage, single parent households, low income housing, single mothers, single fathers, unwanted pregnancies, abortion is right or wrong, brothers, sisters, grandparents, working parents, generation gaps between children and parents, parents talking to their children about social i.e. sex, abortion, drug use, and other various issues, parents teaching their children rather than schools, family room, sitting down for dinner at the kitchen table, parents as role models, siblings taking care of younger siblings to help with responsibility at home, divorc ...
    Related: abortion, ideal family, supreme court, total number, gender
  • Add - 1,362 words
    Add Attention Deficit Disorder For centuries children have been grounded, beaten, or even killed for ignoring the rules or not listening to what they're told. In the past it was thought these "bad" kids were the products of bad parenting, bad environment, or simply being stubborn, however it is now known that many of these children may have had Attention Deficit Disorder, or A. D. D., and could've been helped. A. D. D. is a syndrome that affects millions of children and adults in the United States and is a very frustrating and confusing syndrome that often goes undiagnosed. While there is no clear-cut definition of A. D. D., it's known that it's a genetic disorder that affects males more oft ...
    Related: manic depression, negative aspects, prison population, instantly
  • Affliction - 1,273 words
    Affliction Affliction, based on the novel by Russell Banks, was very interesting, mysterious, and kept you guessing up until it was over. The actors/actresses portrayed in the movie was Wade Whitehouse (Nick Nolte), Wade's girlfriend Margie Fogg (Sissy Spacek), Glen Whitehouse (James Coburn), Rolfe Whitehouse (William Defoe), Lillian (Mary Beth Hurt), Jill (Brigid Tierney), and Jack Hewit (Jim True). The movie begins by Rolfe Whitehouse (William Defoe) narrating the movie about a phone call he received from his brother, Wade Whitehouse (Nick Nolte), the night after Halloween, which was what lead up to Wade's mysterious disappearance. Using a narrative approach in the movie was an excellent c ...
    Related: new hampshire, point of view, jack nicholson, narrating, frozen
  • Africanamerican Representation In The Media - 1,845 words
    African-American Representation In The Media In Jacqueline Bobo's article, The Color Purple : Black Women as Cultural Readers, she discusses the way in which black women create meaning out of the mainstream text of the film The Color Purple. In Leslie B. Innis and Joe R. Feagin's article, The Cosby Show : The View From the Black Middle Class, they are examining black middle-class responses to the portrayal of black family life on The Cosby Show. In their respective articles, Bobo, and Innis and Feagin are investigating the representation of race, particularly African American race, in the mass media. The chief concerns of their investigations lie in how African Americans deal with the way th ...
    Related: mainstream media, mass media, media, representation, working women
  • Aids - 1,140 words
    ... f the mouth by the fungus Candida Albicans, is common in the early symptomatic phase of AIDS. Other infectious fungi include species of the genus Cryptococcus, a major cause of Meningitis in up to 13 percent of people with AIDS. Also, infection by the fungus Histoplasma Capsulatum affects up to 10 percent of people with AIDS, causing general weight loss, fever, and respiratory complications or severe central nervous system complications if the infection reaches the brain. Viral opportunistic infections, especially with members of the Herpes virus family, are common in people with AIDS. One Herpes family member, Cytomegalovirus (CMV), infects the retina of the eye and can result in blindn ...
    Related: aids, blood cells, nervous system, human cells, nose
  • Alice Walker 2 - 1,088 words
    Alice Walker 2 There are many different types of authors in the world of literature, authors of horror, romance, suspense, and the type that Alice Walker writes, through personal experiences. Although most critics categorize her writings as feminist, Walker describes herself as a "womanist", she defines this as "a woman who loves other woman...Appreciates and prefers woman culture, woman's emotional flexibility... and woman's strength... Loves the spirit... Loves herself, Regardless". Walker's thoughts and feelings show through in her writing of poetry and novels. Alice Walker writes through her feelings and the morals that she has grown with, she writes about the black woman's struggle for ...
    Related: alice, alice walker, walker, black woman, the color purple
  • American Beauty - 1,640 words
    American Beauty The Color Red The beauty that addresses itself to the eyes is only the spell of the moment; the eye of the body is not always that of the soul. George Sand hit the nail right on the head when he said this in 1872. Appearance versus reality has been a central theme in many American creative works including the film American Beauty. American Beauty is a film that delves into your typical, middle-class suburban American home and slowly uncovers all of the abnormalities that lie within. The family is portrayed as normal but as the films tag line suggests look closer then it is possible to fully understand the implications that takes place in this seemingly happy home. The film is ...
    Related: american, american beauty, american culture, american home, american ideal
  • Angelas Ashes - 1,275 words
    Angela's Ashes Both books that Ive read, Angelas Ashes and The Color of Water both demonstrated behavior than can be considered dysfunctional. A dysfunctional family is one that fails to meet some or all the basic needs of its members. Sometimes these needs, such as food, shelter or clothing are so basic that people take them for granted. More often, emotional needs, such as the need for love, support and security go unmet. Although a family can be dysfunctional in several ways there are some characteristics that occur more often than others. Drugs, alcoholism, death, abandonment, starvation and anxiety are some examples of dysfunctional characteristics that can be found in both Angelas Ashe ...
    Related: parenting skills, summer camp, playing games, therapy, alike
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,098 words
    Anorexia Nervosa Anorexia Nervosa is a very serious disease that is plaguing many young people in our society. This is something that is becoming more and more prevalent. It is something that should not be taken lightly. I have chosen to do my Science report on this topic, because it is something intriguing and it is found in many teens. This is a topic that is too foreign to many people and they need to be educated on the subject. I hope to help that in anyway I can. In the following paragraphs I will discuss the warning signs of anorexia, the people affected by the disease, the disease itself, and certain types of treatments for the disorder. Firstly, I would like to discuss the warning si ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, common sense, eating disorder
  • Articles Analysis - 1,239 words
    Article`S Analysis In Jacqueline Bobo's article, The Color Purple: Black Women as Cultural Readers, it is discussed how black women create meaning out of the mainstream text of the film The Color Purple. In Leslie B Innis and Joe R. Feagin's article, The Cosby Show: The View from the Black Middle Class, they are explaining black middle-classed responses to the portrayal of Black family life on The Cosby Show. In their articles, Bobo, Innis and Feagin are investigating the representation of race, particularly African American race, in the mass media. However, these two shows are better portrayed than what was seen in the first article. This article Midnight Ramble portrays a much earlier medi ...
    Related: african american, the color purple, cosby show, purple, sitting
  • As I Lay Dying - 816 words
    As I Lay Dying In one of William Faulkner's greatest novels, As I lay Dying, the character's selfishness is revealed. As I Lay Dying is a detailed account of the Bundren's family trek across Mississippi to bury Addie, their wife and mother. As Addie is dying, all the characters go through a different state of emotions, all of which are explained in fifty-nine chapters. An analysis of William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying reveals the importance of goals, mishaps, and characters as they look on the death of Addie. During the initial stage after Addie's death three main goals are exposed: burying her, getting new teeth for Anse, and getting an abortion for Dewey Dell. According to George Wolfe, "Ad ...
    Related: as i lay dying, dysfunctional family, william faulkner, dewey dell, flood
  • Attempts At Poetry Explication - 567 words
    Attempts at Poetry Explication Death, be not proud (P 596) Death, be not proud is the unusual portrayal of Death as a bringer of deliverance "...rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be..." rather than a figure of hell, torment, and punishment, "Rest of their bones, and soul's delivery." through a fourteen-line sonnet (written in iambic pentameter). The speaker emphasizes the inevitability of death through its personification which allots death a more formidable role through characterization. "...we wake eternally..." is an allusion to heaven, accentuating death's role as deliverer rather than a persecutor. As a servant, a deliverer of souls, Death paradoxically dies at the end of the poem ...
    Related: explication, poetry, death be not proud, punishment, lend
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity - 1,205 words
    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder or Hyperactivity (ADHD), disorder beginning in childhood, characterized by a persistent inability to sit still, focus attention on specific tasks, and control impulses. Children with ADHD show these behaviors more frequently and severely than other children of the same age. A person with ADHD may have difficulty with school, work, friendships, or family life. ADHD has also been referred to as attention-deficit disorder, hyperkinesis, minimal brain dysfunction, and minimal brain damage. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder is one of the most common mental disorders of childhood, affecting 3 to 5 percent of school-age ...
    Related: attention deficit, attention deficit disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, deficit, deficit disorder, deficit hyperactivity, hyperactivity
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder - 1,225 words
    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Understanding the Behavioral Disorder: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Imagine living in a fast-moving kaleidoscope, where sounds, images, and thoughts are constantly shifting. Feeling easily bored, yet helpless to keep your mind on tasks you need to complete. Distracted by unimportant sights and sounds, your mind drives you from one thought or activity to the next. Perhaps you are so wrapped up in a collage of thoughts and images that you don't notice when someone speaks to you. "Tommy can't sit still. He is disruptive at school with his constant talking and clowning around. He leaves the classroom without the teacher's permission. Al ...
    Related: attention deficit, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, deficit, deficit hyperactivity, disorder, hyperactivity, hyperactivity disorder
  • Beethoven - 1,053 words
    Beethoven Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven overcame many obstacles throughout his life (1770-1827). By expanding the style of his influences, he accomplished musical tasks before possible. His influences were Neefe, Mozart, and Bach. In comparison to other composers, such as Bach and Mozart, Beethoven produced a relatively small number of symphonies. However, his nine symphonies contained more emotion and ingenuity than all other artists combined. In fact, the Ninth Symphony Orchestra is Beethovens most renowned work, as well as the greatest accomplishment in music history. Beethoven possessed an enormous musical mind, and proved himself to be the most influential composer of all time. Beethov ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig van beethoven, dysfunctional family, music history, composing
  • Behavior Therapies - 1,164 words
    ... at begins 'What if' is a catastrophic thought. Because your body and mind are intimately connected as one bodymind, you start the panic feedback loop of escalating anxiety when you think catastrophic thoughts. Just thinking those upsetting thoughts will cause you to have scary physical symptoms and panic attacks; then you really begin to believe you're going crazy . . . losing control . . . having a heart attack . . . making a fool of yourself . . .going to crash the car, whatever your worst fear is, and your symptoms escalate to the panic level. Cognitive psychotherapists are actively involved and focus on specific problems in the present. Cognitive therapists teach depressed people how ...
    Related: behavior therapy, heart attack, cognitive behavioral, sigmund freud, sigmund
  • Bulemia Nervosa - 1,015 words
    ... owever, this theory is quite controversial. Recently, familial contributions to the etiology and course of bulimia nervosa have been accounted for. Often, women who overeat or undereat have been cited to have had a childhood background of profound deprivation and emotional deficit. Such individuals learned in their families that they were not wanted, worthwhile, or valued. They did not learn to ask for help or to expect their needs to be met. They did not learn healthy ways to handle conflict, difficult emotions, or disappointments. Neither did they learn that the solution to loneliness is to seek friendship. Such individuals may have been severely abused in their homes and have no knowl ...
    Related: bulimia nervosa, nervosa, female students, support services, deprivation
  • Bulimia Nervosa - 1,974 words
    ... Bulimia Nervosa has begun to be recognized in the last 30 years as a serious psychological disorder, primarily affecting women. The essential features are binge eating, which may or may not co-occur with inappropriate means of weight gain prevention. Bulimia, as well as eating disorders in general are the result of biological psychological and psychosocial factors. Urges to overeat, gorge or purge may arise as a backlash to dieting or fasting, but often as a dead-end coping mechanism for many individuals whose lives encompass stress, loneliness or inadequacy (Arenson, 1989). Bulimia appears to affect predominately women at any age from the teens into middle age. White, middle-class adole ...
    Related: bulimia, bulimia nervosa, nervosa, early life, santa barbara
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