Research paper topics, free example research papers

You are welcome to search thousands of free research papers and essays. Search for your research paper topic now!

Research paper example essay prompt: Capital Punishment - 1225 words

NOTE: The samle research paper or essay prompt you see on this page is a free essay, available to anyone. You can use any paper as a sample on how to write research paper, essay prompts or as a source of information. We strongly discourage you to directly copy/paste any essay and turn it in for credit. If your school uses any plagiarism detecting software, you might be caught and accused of plagiarism. If you need a custom essay or research paper, written from scratch exclusively for you, please use our paid research paper writing service!

Capital Punishment Since the beginning of recorded history, mankind has made use of the idea of capital punishment. Most ancient societies accepted the notion that certain crimes deserved the death penalty. The idea of a crime punishable by death dates far back to Ancient Rome and the laws passed at that time. Till this day, however, there is still much debate as to whether or not capital punishment should be abolished. Although there are numerous arguments for and against the situation, the only way to fully understand something is to look at the death penalty from both standing viewpoints.

When discussing Capital Punishment, many questions are asked. Is it morally just? Is it an effective punishment? Is it applied fairly? Is it successful in discouraging potential criminals? While there is much evidence to show that the death penalty is in fact successful, the morality and social issues governing it seem to point out that Capital Punishment should in fact be abolished. Is Capital Punishment successful in discouraging potential offenders, or is it simply a penalty which does not strike fear into the criminals of todays society? While there is no more a harsher penalty than that of death, many criminals do in fact fear the death penalty. The death penalty deters murder by putting the fear of death into would be killers. A person is less likely to do something, if he or she thinks that harm will come to him. Another way the death penalty deters murder, is the fact that if the killer is dead, he will not be able to kill again.

Most supporters of the death penalty feel that offenders should be punished for their crimes, and that it does not matter whether it will deter the crime rate. Supporters of the death penalty are in favour of making examples out of offenders, and that the threat of death will be enough to deter the crime rate, but the crime rate is irrelevant. Studies prove that increasing amount of executions does in fact deter murders through out the state (insert figure 1). According to Isaac Ehrlich's study, published on April 16, 1976, eight murders are deterred for each execution that is carried out in the U.S.A. He goes on to say, If one execution of a guilty capital murderer deters the murder of one innocent life, the execution is justified. Punishments should remain as severe as possible, for that is the only way to discourage todays criminals from committing a capital offence. While deterrence is the most frequently made and widely accepted argument in favor of the death penalty, why is it then that the states which do inflict the death penalty, are those with this highest murder rates? (Insert figure 2) While some may conclude that Capital punishment does have its effect on potential offenders, the opposition suggests that there is no conclusive evidence that the death penalty has any impact on the rate of crime.

A recent study shows that in asking 1000 inmates in Californias Matherson Prison on the question of the death penalty, 63% said life in jail is far worse than the death penalty. Capital punishment is no more effective a deterrent that prolonged incarceration. Is the death penalty a moral or immoral punishment? Capital punishment comes from the idea of retribution. This widely held concept dates back to ancient civilizations and the Mosaic Code. The idea of "an eye for an eye" has long been used by many societies and was a basic principle regarding punishments, especially murder.

Many of the ancient rulers, and to some effect even todays leaders, feel that if you take someones life it is only sensible for you to lose yours. Bibliography Capital Punishment Since the beginning of recorded history, mankind has made use of the idea of capital punishment. Most ancient societies accepted the notion that certain crimes deserved the death penalty. The idea of a crime punishable by death dates far back to Ancient Rome and the laws passed at that time. Till this day, however, there is still much debate as to whether or not capital punishment should be abolished. Although there are numerous arguments for and against the situation, the only way to fully understand something is to look at the death penalty from both standing viewpoints. When discussing Capital Punishment, many questions are asked.

Is it morally just? Is it an effective punishment? Is it applied fairly? Is it successful in discouraging potential criminals? While there is much evidence to show that the death penalty is in fact successful, the morality and social issues governing it seem to point out that Capital Punishment should in fact be abolished. Is Capital Punishment successful in discouraging potential offenders, or is it simply a penalty which does not strike fear into the criminals of todays society? While there is no more a harsher penalty than that of death, many criminals do in fact fear the death penalty. The death penalty deters murder by putting the fear of death into would be killers. A person is less likely to do something, if he or she thinks that harm will come to him. Another way the death penalty deters murder, is the fact that if the killer is dead, he will not be able to kill again. Most supporters of the death penalty feel that offenders should be punished for their crimes, and that it does not matter whether it will deter the crime rate. Supporters of the death penalty are in favour of making examples out of offenders, and that the threat of death will be enough to deter the crime rate, but the crime rate is irrelevant.

Studies prove that increasing amount of executions does in fact deter murders through out the state (insert figure 1). According to Isaac Ehrlich's study, published on April 16, 1976, eight murders are deterred for each execution that is carried out in the U.S.A. He goes on to say, If one execution of a guilty capital murderer deters the murder of one innocent life, the execution is justified. Punishments should remain as severe as possible, for that is the only way to discourage todays criminals from committing a capital offence. While deterrence is the most frequently made and widely accepted argument in favor of the death penalty, why is it then that the states which do inflict the death penalty, are those with this highest murder rates? (Insert figure 2) While some may conclude that Capital punishment does have its effect on potential offenders, the opposition suggests that there is no conclusive evidence that the death penalty has any impact on the rate of crime. A recent study shows that in asking 1000 inmates in Californias Matherson Prison on the question of the death penalty, 63% said life in jail is far worse than the death penalty.

Capital punishment is no more effective a deterrent that prolonged incarceration. Is the death penalty a moral or immoral punishment? Capital punishment comes from the idea of retribution. This widely held concept dates back to ancient civilizations and the Mosaic Code. The idea of "an eye for an eye" has long been used by many societies and was a basic principle regarding punishments, especially murder. Many of the ancient rulers, and to some effect even todays leaders, feel that if you take someones life it is only sensible for you to lose yours.

Related: capital punishment, penalty capital punishment, punishment, death penalty, crime rate

Research paper topics, free essay prompts, sample research papers on Capital Punishment