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  • J D Salinger - 1,182 words
    J. D. Salinger The worth of a book is to be measured by what you can carry away from it. -James Bryce* In 1945, a novel was published that would forever change the way society views itself. The book, entitled The Catcher in the Rye, would propel a man named Jerome David Salinger to fame as one of the most famous authors of the twentieth century. This same man, not ten years after the publication and while still in the peak of his career, would depart from this society- the one that he so greatly changed leaving nothing but his literature to be his lasting voice. However one may view this mysterious life of J. D. Salinger, there is but one thing for certain: J. D. Salinger has provided the re ...
    Related: j. d. salinger, salinger, early childhood, world war ii, stray
  • J D Salinger - 1,251 words
    ... that Salinger is a literary phenomenon who created the dialect of a generation (qtd. Salinger CA 5-8: 998). For the first time, a generation had an author who seemed to understand them, who somehow could capture their values, aspirations, and ultimately define their outlook on society. Maxwell Geismar stated that Salinger accomplishes this task of perceiving the young generations in a way that nobody since F. Scott Fitzgerald [has] done as well (qtd. in Salinger CA 999). Salinger and his novel The Catcher in the Rye became a voice of a generation, a generation who believed that phoniness is the cardinal sin. Aside from the hero Holden Caulfield from The Catcher in the Rye, the short stor ...
    Related: j. d. salinger, salinger, holden caulfield, life story, reflection
  • J Edgar Hoover - 1,411 words
    J. Edgar Hoover For nearly half a century J. Edgar Hoover was one of the most powerful officials in the Federal government of the United States. As head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation from 1924 until his death in 1972, he was the nations chief law enforcement officer. His intimate knowledge of politicians and government operations made him a man to be feared by elected officials, and none of the eight presidents under whom he served dared fire him. J.Edgar Hoover was born on January 1, 1895, in Washington D.C. He attended George Washington University and earned a degree in 1917. In 1919 he became assistant to Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer in the Department of Justice. It was Pa ...
    Related: edgar, hoover, j edgar hoover, post world, department of justice
  • Jack Dempsey - 265 words
    Jack Dempsey ##Jack Dempsey ? ? Jack Dempsey was born William Dempsey in 1895, Jack Dempsey was called the hardest puncher in the history of boxing. He started street fighting when he was 7, his power came from strong back and shoulder muscles, made from working in the copper mines and as a lumberjack. He turned pro at 19 and flattened all opposition. He was a dirty fighter, often hitting low, behind the head and after the bell. He was called the Manassa Mauler and he destroyed contender Fred Fulton in 18 seconds, then Carl Morris in 14 seconds. Sometimes he would win a fight in three men in one night. He knocked out Jess Willard in the third round to win the title in 1919, he had seven knoc ...
    Related: dempsey, jack, willard, fulton
  • Jack Kerouac - 1,303 words
    Jack Kerouac Jack Kerouac was a poet who focused on the forgotten people of the world. Wherever he traveled he found the places nobody wanted to find and turned the un-pretty into magnificent poetry. Kerouac used the people no one wanted to remember and turned them into poetic works of art. Jack Kerouacs life was filled with adventure and self-destruction. Born on March 12, 1922, Kerouac grew up in the poor city of Lowell, Massachusetts. His life was tormented with poverty and alcoholism, first by his father, then he himself was afflicted by the deadly disease. At the age of 8, Kerouac lost his brother, Gerard to typhoid fever. Kerouac traveled hitchhike style across the country. In 1943, Ke ...
    Related: jack, jack kerouac, kerouac, football team, columbia university
  • Jack Kerouac And The Beat Movement - 1,084 words
    Jack Kerouac And The Beat Movement World War II marked a wide dividing line between the old and the new in American society and the nations literature(The World Book Encyclopedia 427) . When world War II ended there was a pent up desire that had been postponed due to the war. Post war America brought about a time when it seemed that every young man was doing the same thing, getting a job, settling down and starting a family. America was becoming a nation of consumers. One group that was against conforming to this dull American lifestyle was referred to as Beatniks. The Beats or Beatniks condemned middle class American life as morally bankrupt. They praised individualism as the highest human ...
    Related: beat, jack, jack kerouac, kerouac, american society
  • Jack London - 1,059 words
    Jack London One is led to believe that if a person is an author, then that person would have the best education that is available to them. However, this is not the case for Jack London. He dropped out of school at the age of fourteen and explored San Francisco, stole oysters, worked for the government, went to Japan, and traveled around the United States by hitching rides on freight trains. This is just a list of the few things he did during the five-year period while he did not attend school. He then returned and finished high school at the age of nineteen to continue onto the University of California at Berkeley, only to quit after one semester. Yet, he is described by Howard Lacchtman, as ...
    Related: jack, jack london, london, call of the wild, kidney disease
  • Jack London - 688 words
    Jack London Jack London (1876-1916) was easily the most successful and best-known writer in America in the first decade of the 20th century. He is best known for his books, The Call of the Wild, White Fang, and The Sea-Wolf, and a few short stories, such as "To Build a Fire" and "The White Silence." He was a productive writer whose fiction traveled through three lands and their cultures such as the Yukon, California, and the South Pacific. His most famous writings included war, boxing stories, and the life of the Molokai lepers. "He was among the most influential people of his day, who understood how to use the media to market his self-created image of a once poor boy to now famous writer"(b ...
    Related: jack, jack london, london, search results, white fang
  • Jack Merridew - 520 words
    Jack Merridew Jack Merridew He was tall, thin, and bony, and his hair was red beneay the black cap. His face was crumpled and freckled, and ugly without silliness. A cruel and ugly bully, he early develops a taste for violence. He is a leader of the choir at first, and then of the hunters. His leadership resides in his ability to threaten and frighten those under him. He is always ready for a fight. His victory over Piggy represents the triumph of violence over intellect, as he smashes one of the lenses of the fat boy's glasses. The knife that he carries is a symbol of the death and destruction that accompany his every act. He does have some attractive qualities-bravery and resourcefulness. ...
    Related: jack, human beings, left hand, human civilization, glasses
  • Jack The Ripper Was A Murderous Madman Who Terrorized Prostitutes In The Late 1880s Time Has Not Diminished The Gruesomeness - 1,009 words
    Jack the Ripper was a murderous madman who terrorized prostitutes in the late 1880s. Time has not diminished the gruesomeness of the killings. All the victims' throats were cut; some victims were disemboweled; and the killer took organs from some of his victims. When fear of the Ripper peaked, the killings stopped, and a century of speculation ensued (jack 1). Many authors have tried to sift through the evidence and have arrived at their own theories as to the identity of the killer. Still there has never been conclusive proof of who the murderer was and what were his motives. To understand the difficulty of solving the murder it is necessary to look at the historical circumstances, the Ripp ...
    Related: diminished, jack, jack the ripper, murderous, ripper
  • Jack The Ripper Was A Murderous Madman Who Terrorized Prostitutes In The Late 1880s Time Has Not Diminished The Gruesomeness - 1,011 words
    ... bered in such a disgusting manner that anyone who saw her vowed that they would never forget the savagery. Perhaps because the murderer had the privacy of a room, he performed the most mutilations on this victim (Ryder 1). He cut her throat, cut out her heart and other organs and flayed her legs to the bone. A reward was set up after this murder to pay any informant who could reveal the identity of Jack the Ripper, but nobody came forward. The police never found the murder weapon or a clue that could help to positively identify the killer. They did have a number of leads and suspects. Writers are continuing to add to that list of suspects even today. Numerous witnesses came forward to de ...
    Related: diminished, jack, jack the ripper, murderous, ripper
  • Jackie Robinson - 237 words
    Jackie Robinson Breaking the Color Barrier Jackie Robinson was an American athlete, business executive, and civil rights leader. Born in Cairo, Georgia, to a family of sharecroppers, Jack Roosevelt Robinson attended Pasadena Junior College in California and the University of California at Los Angeles. At UCLA he demonstrated exceptional athletic ability and became the first UCLA student-athlete to win varsity letters in four sports; football, basketball, baseball, and track. In 1941 Robinson left college to join the United States Army. After graduating from Officers Candidate School, Robinson became a second lieutenant in what was then a segregated army. Troubled by the mistreatment of black ...
    Related: jackie, jackie robinson, robinson, united states army, kansas city
  • Jackson Jarrell - 396 words
    Jackson Jarrell Washed Out Randall Jackson Jarrell was born on May 6, 1914 in Nashville, Tennessee. He was the first child to Campbell and Owen Jarrell. He attended Hume-Fogg High School in Nashville and later graduated. He then attended Vanderbilt University through the generosity of his uncle Howell Campbell. His teacher, John Crowe Ransom, considered him "the best by far of the young writers in his workshop." Jarrell later went on to teach at some well know colleges and universities. He also went into the army and wanted to be a gunner but he failed. Jarrell had a mental break down, and was hospitalized for a while. He was released from the medical center. He was on a trip back to the doc ...
    Related: jackson, jarrell, medical center, vanderbilt university, classified
  • Jackson Pollock: Working Methods - 1,938 words
    Jackson Pollock: Working Methods Jackson Pollack was a complex man who brought many things into the forefront of impressionism. Although he led a very short life of 44 years he was known as one of the pioneers of abstract impressionism. His abstract painting techniques and unhealthy psychological being made him very sought after, studied and critiqued. Within his complexity came out a brilliant artist that was widely considered the most influential painter of the 20th century. Pollacks first documented adventure into the art world was in 1929 when he began to study painting at the Art Students League in New York City. Jackson, by this time in his life had already become a full-blown alcoholi ...
    Related: jackson, jackson pollock, psychiatric treatment, good life, mexican
  • Jacksonian Democracy - 1,243 words
    ... 8/6/98 Essay 5 Equality in Democracy The United States of America was founded by its people, for its people in the pursuit of life, liberty and happiness, by attempting to provide freedom and equality. The way of life back when the government set down its foundation was quite different than it is now. Some things were just considered natural law and were left out of law making and the Constitution because they were morally accepted as right and wrong. For instance, I highly doubt that the government would have allowed Nazi party privileges to exist under freedom of speech. The idea of My rights end where yours begin states that an individual has freedom until the freedom interferes with ...
    Related: democracy, democracy in america, jacksonian, jacksonian democracy, freedom of speech
  • Jacksonian Era - 726 words
    Jacksonian Era Jacksonian Era The Jackson democrats attempted to amplify the strength of lower classes' poor, while decreasing the influence of the rich and powerful. Economically, they benefited from governing during a time of leading advances in transportation, which boosted commerce and helped the common man. Politically, they invested power into an overwhelmingly powerful executive branch. The Jacksonian democrats portrayed themselves as saviors of the common people and ruled via a powerful executive who attempted to destroy aristocracy in America. However, they were atypically wealthy, supported equality between white men only, enacted disastrous economic policies and disregarded the ca ...
    Related: jacksonian, jacksonian democracy, foreign affairs, universal principles, economy
  • Jacksonian Presidency - 456 words
    Jacksonian Presidency Jacksonian Presidency Summary Despite the looming effects of the Jacksonian presidency, the following only discusses the actions and results, which occurred during the Jacksonian presidency. The activation of a new presidency was accompanied by huge numbers of Hickoryites (Jacksonian supporters) and official hopefuls. Many of these hopefuls were granted their desire of holding office, which is one of the changes brought into Washington by Andrew Jackson. The major accomplishments of Jackson during his presidency pertain to his rural upbrining and democratic beliefs. Jacksons major accomplishments were his nationalization of the spoils system, his liberal application of ...
    Related: jacksonian, presidency, president jackson, first president, jackson
  • Jacky Robinson - 551 words
    Jacky Robinson (1919-72) Jack Roosevelt Robinson was born in Cairo, Georgia., on January 31, 1919 to Jerry and Mallie Robinson. He grew up in Pasadena, California. In high school and at Pasadena Junior College he showed great athletic skill in track, basketball, football, and baseball. He left school in 1941 and was drafted the following year for Army service during World War II. After receiving a medical discharge in 1945, Jackie Robinson decided to tryout for the Boston Red Sox, but ended up not making the team. He spent a year playing baseball with the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro National League. Later he played in the 1946 season with the Montreal Royals, a Dodgers farm club, and l ...
    Related: jackie robinson, robinson, african american, junior college, ball
  • Jaclyn Parker - 1,089 words
    Jaclyn Parker Amistad book review Topics in U.S. History 1 Prof. Davidson March 25, 1998 The novel Amistad is one that discusses a group of slaves that were originally transported from Africa by Spanish traders employed by Queen Isabella II. These traders, however, claimed that these slaves came from Havanna, Cuba. The book reveals that these slaves were not unaccustomed to slavery in their own country. Cinque said at one point that there were some people who were enslaved because of debts or other such problems. He knew that he did not want to be a slave in America because of the way that he would be treated, and he was somewhat ashamed to say that in his country, his people had been enslav ...
    Related: parker, double standard, slavery in america, u.s. history, portray
  • Jacob Have I Loved - 332 words
    Jacob Have I Loved Jacob Have I Loved is a great book for any child that resents their siblings, because thats how this twin sister relationship is best described. Sara Louise recalls her difficult adolescence on Rass Island and her intense jealousy of her own twin sister Caroline. Caroline is a selfish, over protected person and Sara Louise feels like her life is based on competing with the most admired sister Caroline. Caroline always got what she wanted and was considered to be the attractive one, smarter one by her mother and grandmother. Foe example one day before attending church when Sara Louise unexpectedly became a woman she stained her Sunday dress and couldnt go to church, her gra ...
    Related: jacob, point of view, most admired, best friend, grandmother
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